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Blogs

Colorado School of Public Health In the News

Colorado Public Radio

State launches first-ever firearm data dashboard meant to help Coloradans better understand gun violence, prevention

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateFebruary 26, 2024

Beyond mass shootings, which generate a lot of media and public attention, gun deaths have steadily increased in Colorado for more than a decade, according to the state health department and reflected on the dashboard. During that time, state leaders and community advocates have worked to fight the trend. Now they’re turning to a new avenue — a public health approach to gun violence prevention. 

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The Denver Post

CDC chops $5 million in funding to Colorado research center working with local public health groups

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateFebruary 23, 2024

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention plans to end its funding for a Colorado center that helps local public health organizations get their programs off the ground and prove they work. Colorado’s Democratic members of Congress sent a letter to the director of the CDC this week asking that the agency reconsider cutting funding to the Rocky Mountain Prevention Research Center.

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Colorado Public Radio

Can Colorado teachers feel more prepared for school emergencies?

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateFebruary 21, 2024

Between reading, writing, and arithmetic, there are also disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and acts of violence at schools. While school districts have security and drills for these events, educators often have unanswered questions and are left feeling anxious and overwhelmed. Two Anschutz researchers wanted to change that, starting with gathering school staff’s ideas and addressing their questions about safety.

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CSU Source

What do your blood test results mean? A toxicologist explains the basics of how to interpret them

news outletCSU Source
Publish DateFebruary 07, 2024

As a toxicologist, Brad Reisfeld, a ColoradoSPH professor at CSU, studies the effects of drugs and environmental contaminants on human health. As part of his work, he relies on various health-related biomarkers, many of which are measured using conventional blood tests. Understanding what common blood tests are intended to measure can help you better interpret the results.

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Wall Street Journal

Marijuana Messes With Your Driving for Longer Than You Think

news outletWall Street Journal
Publish DateFebruary 05, 2024

You may think you’re OK to drive an hour or two after you get high on marijuana. Researchers and doctors say you’re not. Pot affects you differently than alcohol, can linger in your system for longer, and it can be harder to figure out when it’s safe to drive. 

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CU Connections

Regents celebrate CU luminaries with slate of annual awards

news outletCU Connections
Publish DateFebruary 01, 2024

Ned Calonge received a Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes those persons whose achievements and contributions are particularly associated with the state and/or nation.

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Public Health Post

The Secret World of Youth Vaping

news outletPublic Health Post
Publish DateJanuary 24, 2024

Youth vaping has risen at an unprecedented rate since vaping products were first introduced into the U.S. market in 2007. In 2011, 5% of U.S. high school students reported that they had tried e-cigarettes (i.e., “vaping”). Eight years later, in 2019, 50% of high school students had tried vaping and 7% were vaping every day. Vaping is now more common among adolescents than smoking cigarettes. In 2022, 21% of 12th graders reported having vaped in the past month compared to 4% who smoked. 

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9 News

Nearly half of Colorado adults live in a home with a gun, survey finds

news outlet9 News
Publish DateJanuary 15, 2024

Nearly half of Colorado adults live in a home with a gun, but more than one-third of them have never taken a firearms safety class. Those are among the findings of a statewide survey conducted by the Colorado School of Public Health and the state’s Office of Gun Violence Prevention. The goal was to gather baseline data to help guide efforts to curb gun injuries and deaths, said Erin Kelly, the lead researcher.

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The Denver Post

Colorado can expect increase in COVID infections in coming weeks as JN.1 variant takes hold

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJanuary 12, 2024

Colorado likely will experience a rise in COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses in the coming weeks, but the state isn’t expected to see major challenges to health care capacity. Given the national trajectory, Colorado most likely is entering a period of increasing infections, said Cathy Bradley, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health.

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The New York Times

U.S. Diet Panel Adds Another Researcher With Alcohol Industry Ties

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2024

After dropping two Harvard experts who had received industry support, the National Academies turned to a colleague with a similar background to review the cumulative evidence about the relationship between drinking and a wide range of health issues, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, cognitive health and all-cause mortality.

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BNN News

Colorado Initiative Advocates for Mental Health and Substance Use Support in the Workplace

news outletBNN News
Publish DateJanuary 07, 2024

The Colorado Recovery Friendly Workplace Initiative, a program active in 30 states, is diligently working to transform employer attitudes and policies regarding mental health and substance abuse. The initiative is led by the Center for Health, Work & Environment at the Colorado School of Public Health, based at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Steamboat Pilot & Today

Valley employers join Recovery Friendly Workplace Initiative

news outletSteamboat Pilot & Today
Publish DateJanuary 07, 2024

Recovery Friendly Workplace, a nationwide effort currently active in 30 states, is an expanding initiative to protect the mental health of workers while helping workers retain their jobs. In Colorado, the effort is spearheaded through the Center for Health, Work & Environment academic center at the Colorado School of Public Health that advances worker health, safety and well-being. 

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Colorado School of Public Health

December 2023 LRPC at ColoradoSPH Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateDecember 31, 2023

December 2023 Newsletter

  • Vaccination Centers and COVID-19
  • Community Events & Opportunities
  • Professional Development & Training
  • Employment Opportunities
  • Grants & Funding
  • Additional Resources
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Health Leaders

Are Health Systems Mature Enough to Use AI Properly?

news outletHealth Leaders
Publish DateDecember 06, 2023

As healthcare leaders rush to implement AI tools, some are questioning whether they’re equipped, both technically and organizationally, to use the technology. According to Arlen Meyers, a professor emeritus at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Colorado School of Public Health, and a strategy advisor to MI10, the MIQ tool was used to evaluate dozens of health systems across the country, and found many that hadn’t even met readiness standards yet.

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The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Science Without Limits: Highlighting LGBTQIA+ Voices in STEM

news outletThe Rocky Mountain Collegian
Publish DateNovember 29, 2023

As a dedicated research institution, Colorado State University is well acquainted with the fact that science knows no boundaries. CSU has a long history of research and scientific study with a diverse group of professionals working in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. However, LGBTQIA+ individuals are roughly 20% less represented in the STEM fields than statistically expected.

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MedPage Today

AI Gets It Mostly Right on Allergy Myths

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateNovember 13, 2023

It’s important to understand how ChatGPT answers questions, noted Matthew DeCamp, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, who wasn’t involved in the study.

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CPR

What Not to Take Home from This Year’s Holiday Gathering? COVID-19. Here’s the Best Way to Steer Clear of It This Holiday Season

news outletCPR
Publish DateNovember 06, 2023

We all love the tasty Thanksgiving turkey and scrumptious stuffing. But safe to say no one wants to bring COVID-19 home with the leftovers. Ugh, right? But all the key coronavirus indicators in Colorado are pointing toward a rise in cases, and hospitalizations are as high as they’ve been since the start of 2023, with millions of thousands of Coloradans gathering and traveling over the holidays. 

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Colorado School of Public Health

October 2023 LRPC@ColoradoSPH Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateOctober 31, 2023

In this newsletter: vaccination centers and COVID-19; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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Scientific American

This Public Health Measure Bridges the National Divide over Firearms-Just Don't Call It Gun Control

news outletScientific American
Publish DateOctober 19, 2023

For Jess Hegstrom, suicide prevention coordinator for Lewis and Clark County, Montana,  the greatest gifts we can give to people struggling with suicide are time and space between their thoughts and their firearms.

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NPR

How Gas Utilities Used Tobacco Tactics to Avoid Gas Stove Regulations

news outletNPR
Publish DateOctober 17, 2023

In the late 1960s, natural gas utilities launched "Operation Attack," a bold marketing campaign to bring lots more gas stoves into people's kitchens. The gas utilities called Operation Attack their "most ambitious advertising and merchandising program ever." But as it got underway, concerns were becoming public about indoor pollution from gas stoves, including household levels of nitrogen dioxide.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID Hospitalizations Are Rising Again Following Summer Dip

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateOctober 06, 2023

Colorado’s COVID-19 hospitalizations are rising again, but it’s not clear if they’ll stay at roughly this level or continue to increase as the weather gets colder. Hospitalizations have been slowly increasing since early August, but jumped more noticeably in the last two weeks, from 131 people hospitalized for the virus in Colorado on Sept. 19 to 195 on Monday — the highest total since mid-March.

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HuffPost

Forever Chemicals' Are Everywhere, But These Are The Most Common Sources

news outletHuffPost
Publish DateOctober 05, 2023

Dr. Ned Calonge, associate dean for public health practice in the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, has investigated the health effects of PFAS. A 2022 report he collaborated on found a strong link between PFAS and kidney cancer, and more moderate association with breast and testicular cancer.

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Colorado School of Public Health

September 2023 LRPC@ColoradoSPH Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateSeptember 30, 2023

In this newsletter: vaccination centers and COVID-19; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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Colorado School of Public Health

August 2023 LRPC@ColoradoSPH Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateAugust 31, 2023

In this newsletter: vaccination centers and COVID-19; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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Education Today

How a New Training Eases Teachers’ Anxiety About Emergency Drills

news outletEducation Today
Publish DateAugust 25, 2023

For teachers, preparing for an emergency such as an active shooter at school can be anxiety-provoking and overwhelming. A new research-based training aims to ease some of the anxiety by incorporating mental health support into the drills.

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Colorado School of Public Health

July 2023 LRPC@ColoradoSPH Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateJuly 01, 2023

In this newsletter: vaccination centers and COVID-19; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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UCHealth

Two Decades On, West Nile Virus Still a Threat to Colorado

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateJune 23, 2023

ColoradoSPH researcher Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS, shares valuable insight on West Nile virus, best strategies for recovery, and the potential disease caseload for this year.

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Healthline

Here's How to Keep Wildfire Smoke Out of Your Home

news outletHealthline
Publish DateJune 08, 2023

With wildfire season upon us, cities across the United States are being urged by health officials to stay inside, but even indoor air can be hazardous. “There are two general ways to decrease your exposure to wildfire smoke – breathe less or breathe cleaner air." Mike Van Dyke, PhD, gives tips on how to keep your indoor air clean when under an air quality alert.

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Climate Central

As Floodwaters Receded, Poisonous Mold Flourished in NJ Homes

news outletClimate Central
Publish DateJune 01, 2023

It wasn’t until last spring that Charlene Dionio’s father was hospitalized by poisonous after-effects of Hurricane Ida, which swept from Louisiana through New England the previous fall, killing more than 100 in the United States, including 29 in New Jersey.

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California Air Resources Board

Dean Samet Recently Received a Haagen-Smit Clean Air Award for Environmental Health Research

news outletCalifornia Air Resources Board
Publish DateMay 31, 2023

The California Air Resources Board recently announced the 2022 winners of the Haagen-Smit Clean Air Awards. Dean Samet received the award for his work in environmental health research, with extensive and steady landmark contributions to the understanding of the health impacts of both outdoor and indoor air pollution.

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State of Reform

Colorado Measure to Study Viability of State-Based Healthcare System Fails in Legislature, but Pursuit of Affordability Continues

news outletState of Reform
Publish DateMay 25, 2023

A measure by Colorado Democrats proposing to conduct a study of a statewide publicly financed or universal healthcare system with direct compensation to providers failed in this year’s legislative session, which ended on May 8th. House Bill 1209 called for the Colorado School of Public Health (CSPH) to administer the policy analysis and development for a publicly funded and privately delivered universal healthcare payment system alongside a state task force. 

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NPR

Once 'Paradise,' Parched Colorado Valley Grapples with Arsenic in Water

news outletNPR
Publish DateMay 22, 2023

The study, led by Kathy James, ColoradoSPH associate professor, focuses on arsenic in private drinking wells in San Luis Valley groundwater, which she says has been gradually increasing in drinking wells over the past 50 years.

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Journal of the Endocrine Society

Endocrine Society’s New Scientific Statement Identifies Research Gaps in Pediatric, LGBTQIA Care

news outletJournal of the Endocrine Society
Publish DateMay 16, 2023

The statement, co-authored by Dana Dabelea, an endowed professor and director of the LEAD Center, highlights the need for future endocrine research to address health disparities in pediatric populations and among sexual and gender minoritized individuals.

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CBS News

Colorado Doctors Leading New Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative

news outletCBS News
Publish DateMay 16, 2023

The number of people impacted by gun violence in Colorado is growing. As a Denver Public School parent, Paul Ballenger says the recent shooting at East High School hit home.

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Scripps

Colorado Leads States in Storing Guns Outside of the Home

news outletScripps
Publish DateApril 12, 2023

Options for firearm storage at gun ranges and retailers is part of the Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative, spearheaded by Emmy Betz, a professor of epidemiology and deputy director of the Injury and Violence Prevention Center.

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The Collegian

CSU Professor Works for Environmental Justice

news outletThe Collegian
Publish DateApril 06, 2023

Stephanie Malin is a ColoradoSPH adjunct professor, associate professor at Colorado State University and one of the co-founders and steering members of the Center for Environmental Justice at Colorado State University.

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The Denver Post

Marshall Fire Victims with Lower Incomes, Less Insurance Lag in Rebuilding, Study Finds

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateApril 05, 2023

Lower-income Marshall fire victims in Colorado are facing difficulties in rebuilding after the wildfire, with a new study by Assistant Professor of Environmental Katie Dickinson revealing that they are lagging behind due to limited insurance coverage and financial resources.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Doctors, Advocates Tackle “Pervasive” Health Misinformation Head-On

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateApril 03, 2023

Dr. Jon Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, said the problem of misinformation isn’t new; the tobacco industry created the playbook for disinformation during its long battle to suppress the truth that smoking kills.

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Colorado School of Public Health

April 2023 Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateApril 01, 2023

In this newsletter: vaccination centers and COVID-19; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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American Heart Association

Explaining Cardiovascular Risk Disparities Among Young People With Type 1 Diabetes

news outletAmerican Heart Association
Publish DateMarch 30, 2023

Black and Hispanic children with Type 1 diabetes are more likely than their white peers to develop stiffened arteries, new research finds. "If we can figure out why this difference is, perhaps we can intervene now and maybe there's a chance to reverse the differences that have built up in the first 10 years of their disease," said Katherine Sauder, deputy director of the LEAD center.

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KFF Health News

As Colorado Reels from Another School Shooting, Study Finds 1 in 4 Teens Have Quick Access to Guns

news outletKFF Health News
Publish DateMarch 27, 2023

One in 4 Colorado teens reported they could get access to a loaded gun within 24 hours, according to survey results published Monday. Nearly half of those teens said it would take them less than 10 minutes. “That’s a lot of access and those are short periods of time,” said ColoradoSPH DrPH candidate Virginia McCarthy, lead author of the study.

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CPR

As Gun Deaths Rise, Colorado is Trying Something New — a Public Health Approach to Gun Violence Prevention

news outletCPR
Publish DateMarch 15, 2023

In a first-of-its-kind partnership, the Office of Gun Violence Prevention within the CDPHE is teaming up with researchers from the Injury and Violence Prevention Center in the Colorado School of Public Health. They’ll create and maintain a resource bank of regularly updated and accurate materials regarding gun violence in Colorado.

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American Association for Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Research

Judith Albino Named a 2023 Recipient of AADOCR Jack Hein Public Service Award

news outletAmerican Association for Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Research
Publish DateMarch 15, 2023

The American Association for Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Research award, given to ColoradoSPH Community and Behavioral Health President Emerita Judith Albino, honors individuals who have given exemplary service by consistently promoting the interests and activities of oral health research to a wide audience.

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Fortune

That Raspy Cough You Have Might Not Be COVID. Here’s How To Determine If It’s Another Virus Raging This Winter

news outletFortune
Publish DateMarch 03, 2023

Both COVID and RSV can result in different types of cough, including dry, wet, wheezing, said Dan Olson, associate of epidemiology, to Fortune. While there is no exact way to differentiate the two conditions without testing, there are some potential tells, experts say.

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The Denver Post

COVID-19 Infections Increasing in Colorado, But Hospitalizations Rise Only Slightly

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateFebruary 16, 2023

“We’re sort of at a steady, manageable level for the moment,” said Dean Jon Samet. “It’s too early to say” if the flu is done, he said.

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CNET

US Initiates Monkeypox Vaccine Rollout: What to Know About the Disease and its Symptoms

news outletCNET
Publish DateFebruary 15, 2023

Cases of monkeypox are growing in the US. Daniel Pastula, associate professor of epidemiology, said the vaccine is used in people who've been exposed but aren't yet showing symptoms of monkeypox, because the incubation period for the disease is so long.

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Washington Post

Want to Live Longer? Consider Planting a Tree.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2023

There are several reasons trees may boost health, including better air quality, reduced stress and increased physical activity. “Most evidence confirms that tree planting is beneficial in reducing premature mortality,” said David Rojas Rueda, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health at CSU.

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NPR

Ready, Aim, Suck Up Mosquitoes: An 'Insectazooka' Aims to Find the Next Killer Virus

news outletNPR
Publish DateFebruary 08, 2023

FunSalud, a research team co-founded by Edwin Austrias, professor of epidemiology, is searching for emerging infectious diseases through mosquitos. "We're trying to focus on pathogens that just happen to be in the blood that the mosquito happened to suck up," says Dan Olson, part of the team and assistant professor of epidemiology.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Public Health Goes Hyperlocal, Using Microgrants to Tackle Vaccine Hesitancy and Stigma of Mental Illness

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateFebruary 08, 2023

“I do think that community engagement is a road map for improving public health emergency work in these communities,” said Dr. Ned Calonge, associate dean for public health practice.

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NPR

Native Americans Left Out of 'Deaths of Despair' Research

news outletNPR
Publish DateFebruary 01, 2023

"The problem is if we only focus on 'deaths of despair' (mid-life deaths), we ignore and do not have adequate attention paid to the sources that promote health and well-being in Native people," said Spero Manson, director of the Centers for American Indian & Alaska Native Health, to NPR.

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Denver Business Journal

As Colorado’s Worker Death Toll Rises, Experts Point to These Reasons

news outletDenver Business Journal
Publish DateJanuary 30, 2023

Lili Tenney, assistant professor and director of outreach and programs at the Center for Health, Work & Environment, discusses the rise in Colorado workplace fatalities, mental health struggles, and opioid addiction in the Denver Business Journal.

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The Conversation

Does This Cause Cancer? How Scientists Determine Whether a Chemical is Carcinogenic – Sometimes With Controversial Results

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateJanuary 30, 2023

Determining whether a chemical is carcinogenic is a complex and often controversial process. Dr. Brad Reisfeld, professor of environmental and occupational health at CSU, weighs in on these classifications and how they effect environmental and public health.

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The Colorado Sun

Do Coloradans Need to Care About the New COVID Variant XBB? Yeah, Probably.

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateJanuary 13, 2023

“It’s not evenly distributed across the U.S.,” said Beth Carlton, professor of epidemiology. “It’s grown very rapidly in the Northeast, and there’s every reason to think it will do the same when it gets here.”

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Colorado Public Radio

Fewer People Are Hospitalized With RSV and COVID, but the Flu Is Still Circulating and the Respiratory Season Is Not Over Yet

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateDecember 30, 2022

“I think in terms of the worry that these three infectious respiratory viruses would come together and surge in a way that would strain hospital capacity, we've escaped,” said Dean Jon Samet.

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The Colorado Sun

Opinion: A Thank-You Note to the Colorado Board of Education

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateDecember 22, 2022

Contributing to the Colorado Sun, ColoradoSPH Assistant Program Manager Daniel Martinez, Assistant Professor Heather Kennedy, and Youth Specialist Noah Jansen explore the impact of the Colorado State Board of Education's vote to support the teaching of LGBTQ+ history in Colorado schools.

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The Colorado Sun

Opinion: Capture the Lessons of Colorado’s Response to COVID-19

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateDecember 08, 2022

Contributing to the Colorado Sun, Dean Jon Samet, along with William Burman M.D, explore the successes, failures, and lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing how we can be better prepared for the next health emergency.

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The Denver Post

Flu Appears to be Colorado’s Top Respiratory Threat in Coming Weeks as Hospitalizations Rise

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateDecember 08, 2022

“We’re continuing to see far more people hospitalized with flu than at this time in a typical year,” said Beth Carlton, associate professor of environmental and occupational health. “I think that’s the big concern for the weeks ahead.”

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Health Affairs

Structural Stigma In Law: Implications And Opportunities For Health And Health Equity

news outletHealth Affairs
Publish DateDecember 08, 2022

Because laws are powerful mediators for structural stigma, they are critical levers for antistigma work, according to a new Health Affairs brief co-authored by Daniel Goldberg, associate professor of epidemiology.

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Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Breaks Mass Shooting Record as Gun Deaths Rise

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateDecember 08, 2022

“We need to be looking at what's happening every single day in urban communities and across the country, in terms of suicide, if we really wanna look at where the bulk of gun deaths are,” said Emmy Betz, professor of epidemiology and deputy director of the Injury & Violence Prevention Center.

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PBS News Hour

Ricochet: An American Trauma

news outletPBS News Hour
Publish DateNovember 28, 2022

Emmy Betz, professor of epidemiology, deputy director of the Injury and Violence Prevention Center, and the co-founder of the Colorado Firearm Safety Coalition, a group bringing together the firearms industry and public health researchers to prevent gun suicides, is interviewed for the PBS documentary.

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HuffPost

COVID Superspreader Events Still Exist. Here's What They Look Like Now.

news outletHuffPost
Publish DateNovember 07, 2022

“The decrease in the susceptibility of the population as a whole, increase in personal protective behaviors, and the lack of case reporting have caused superspreader events to both be less likely to occur and less likely to be reported,” said Bailey Fosdick, associate professor of biostatistics and informatics.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

UNC Alum published in CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on Arthritis

news outletCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
Publish DateNovember 04, 2022

Approximately 44% of adults with arthritis report arthritis-attributable limitations, but little is known about arthritis among caregivers.

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The Denver Post

Why is Colorado’s COVID-19 Situation So Much Less Clear Than Last Year?

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateNovember 03, 2022

COVID-19 positivity rates have been rising in Colorado since October, but with fewer people being tested, uncertainty remains. Beth Carlton, associate professor of environmental and occupational health and Jude Bayham, assistant professor of epidemiology at CSU, weigh in for the Denver Post.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID-19 Hospitalizations Rise Significantly For First Time Since June

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateNovember 02, 2022

Given that cases and the percentage of tests coming back positive have been trending up over the last two weeks, it appears that the rise in hospitalizations points to a real increase in infections, said Dean Jon Samet.

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ASPPH

ASPPH Releases New Climate Change Health Framework for Academic Public Health

news outletASPPH
Publish DateNovember 01, 2022

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) recently released “Responding to the Climate Change and Health Crisis: A Framework for Academic Public Health.” The framework will serve as the foundation for ASPPH’s future initiatives and was developed by a task force co-chaired by Dean Jon Samet.

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Self

Experts Are Anticipating Another COVID Wave This Winter—and We’re Not Prepared for It

news outletSelf
Publish DateOctober 25, 2022

“The bottom line is, what happens this winter depends primarily on the next variant that takes over and also on booster uptake or what proportion of the population gets this bivalent booster,” said Beth Carlton, associate professor of environmental & occupational health.

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The Post and Courier

A Tale of 2 Pandemics: Anti-Tobacco Giant Talks COVID-19 Similarities at MUSC

news outletThe Post and Courier
Publish DateOctober 20, 2022

Talking to more than 50 of his peers and interested public, longtime anti-tobacco giant Dean Jon Samet likened the century long “tobacco pandemic” to the COVID-19 pandemic during a presentation at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Hollings Cancer Center.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID Hospitalizations Will Likely Stay Low This Fall, Report Says

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateOctober 13, 2022

“Over the next 12 weeks, we’re pretty confident things will stay low,” said Bailey Fosdick, associate professor of biostatistics and informatics. That doesn’t mean people should treat the virus as a thing of the past, she clarified, emphasizing the importance of vaccinations and boosters.

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The Colorado Sun

Experts Say Vaccines, Behavior Changes Worked as Colorado’s Monkeypox Cases Decline

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateOctober 03, 2022

“The LGBTQ community, particularly men who have sex with men, really stepped up to protect their health and work with public health authorities to get the word out about monkeypox,” Dan Pastula, associate professor of epidemiology said. “I think this would have been way worse without any intervention.”

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Bizwest

UNC Alum Honored in the 40 Under 40 list for Northern Colorado

news outletBizwest
Publish DateSeptember 22, 2022

ColoradoSPH at UNC alum Rudy Vargas, director of the UNC César Chávez Cultural Center, was recently honored in the 40 under 40 for Northern Colorado. The list recognizes 40 emerging business leaders under 40 years of age who are making a mark on their communities through professional success and volunteer activities.

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The Conversation

Is the Pandemic Over? We Asked an Economist, an Education Expert and a Public Health Scholar Their Views

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateSeptember 21, 2022

President Biden answered the question of whether the pandemic is over with a clear ‘yes,’ but this is not a black and white issue, said Lisa Miller, adjunct professor of epidemiology. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter what you call the current situation – COVID-19 still poses a significant, ongoing risk to the world, she reflects.

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Medscape

CDC Reports Two Cases of Monkeypox-Related Encephalomyelitis

news outletMedscape
Publish DateSeptember 14, 2022

Two men in the US developed encephalomyelitis — inflammation of the brain and spinal cord — after contracting monkeypox, according to a new report published by the CDC. Lead author and Associate Professor Dan Pastula explains that these cases are rare and should be reported to state, tribal, local, or territorial health departments.

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The Conversation

Building Something Better: How Community Organizing Helps People Thrive in Challenging Times

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateSeptember 08, 2022

In a time of unprecedented division, rising inequality and intensifying climate change, it’s easy to feel that progress is impossible. Stephanie Malin, assistant professor at CSU, explores how people adapt to crises and thrive in challenging times by working together.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID Hospitalizations Tick Up This Week, but are Expected to Fall Again

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

It’s possible that the downward trajectory has paused because kids returned to school and adults went back to their offices, meaning the virus has more chances to spread, said Beth Carlton, associate professor of environmental and occupational health.

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The Colorado Sun

Colorado’s Next COVID Hurdle: Beating The Usual Fall Surge

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateAugust 24, 2022

As fall approaches, COVID appears to be on a continuous decline in Colorado, defying trends set in the last two years. “Hospitalizations are down. Wastewater levels are down. Percent positivity (of COVID tests) is down. So as we head into the fall, we are in good shape,” said Dean Jon Samet.

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PBS News Hour

Suicides From Firearms Prompt Movement To Address Mental Health Stigmas

news outletPBS News Hour
Publish DateAugust 23, 2022

"The connection between the lethality of firearms and the risk of suicide death is not something that's been talked about enough," reflects Emmy Betz, professor and deputy director of the Injury and Violence Prevention Center.

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The Denver Post

Should Coloradans Worry About Polio? Depends on Whether They’re Vaccinated

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateAugust 19, 2022

If you’re fully vaccinated, the return of polio to parts of the United States is essentially a non-event for you. “If you are unvaccinated, you are vulnerable to paralytic polio anywhere where poliovirus is circulating,” said Daniel Pastula, associate professor of epidemiology.

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The Conversation

Fake Research Can Be Harmful to Your Health – A New Study Offers a Tool for Rooting It Out

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateAugust 18, 2022

Unreliable scientific studies can be hard to spot – whether by reviewers or the general public – but by asking the right questions, it can be done, says Lisa Bero, research professor in the Department of Health Systems, Management & Policy, who co-authored a study identifying warning signs of fraudulent research.

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WAMU

Wildfires Are Becoming More Intense. Are Communities Ready?

news outletWAMU
Publish DateAugust 18, 2022

Katherine Dickinson, ColoradoSPH associate professor of environmental & occupational health, contributed to 1A “Remaking America”, a live discussion to hear how the community is still recovering from the Marshall fire, and what state and local governments can do to become more resilient against climate threats.

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Los Angeles Times

The CDC Loosened its COVID Rules. Who Fills in this Public Health Vacuum?

news outletLos Angeles Times
Publish DateAugust 17, 2022

The CDC relaxed its COVID guidelines last week, leaving decision-making mainly to individuals who lack public health training. The lack of a coordinated public health response deprioritizes community health and worsens longstanding health disparities Daniel Goldberg, associate professor of epidemiology, explains.

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The Denver Post

Colorado COVID Cases Expected to Keep Declining Into Mid-October

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateAugust 17, 2022

Wastewater surveillance data continues to show that the virus’ prevalence in Colorado is dropping, said Bailey Fosdick, associate professor of biostatistics and informatics. But while the situation is improving, the virus is still relatively widespread.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Sees “Substantial” Drop in COVID Hospitalizations After Long Plateau

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateAugust 04, 2022

Colorado’s COVID-19 hospitalizations dropped 14% from last week. Cases are undercounted, meaning that there’s not a clear picture of how many people are truly infected, but the downward trend is still notable said Talia Quandelacy, assistant professor of epidemiology.

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Colorado School of Public Health

Boletín Agosto 2022

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateAugust 01, 2022

Juntos por una comunidad saludable. En este boletín: Centros de vacunación; eventos comunitarios; capacitaciones; oportunidades de trabajo; subsidios y fondos; recursos adicionales.

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Colorado School of Public Health

August 2022 Newsletter

news outletColorado School of Public Health
Publish DateAugust 01, 2022

Together for a healthy community. In this newsletter: vaccination centers; community events and opportunities; professional development and training; employment opportunities; grants and funding; and additional resources.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID Hospitalizations Aren’t Falling as Other Measures of Virus’ Spread Improve — and It’s Not Clear Why

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJuly 28, 2022

Colorado’s COVID-19 hospitalizations remain stuck in the same rough zone they’ve hovered in for the past six weeks. Normally, hospitalizations have started to drop about one week after cases began falling, said Talia Quandelacy, assistant professor of epidemiology.

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CNN

Doctors Should Test Levels of PFAS in People at High Risk, Report Says

news outletCNN
Publish DateJuly 28, 2022

A new report from the National Academies, chaired by Ned Calonge, associate professor of epidemiology, detailed advice for clinicians on how to test, diagnose and treat the millions of Americans who may have been exposed to PFAS.

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CPR

More than 2 Years into the Pandemic, Interpreting COVID-19 Metrics gets Trickier, Especially with Dashboard Changes and Elusive Data

news outletCPR
Publish DateJuly 21, 2022

Omicron variants continue to move through Colorado, keeping positivity rates high. With increasing use of at-home testing kits that often go unreported, Dean Jon Samet says interpreting the surveillance statistics has gotten more complicated.

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