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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

The New York Times


The New York Times

Horse Riding Plus Brain-Building Exercises May Help Kids With Autism, ADHD

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateFebruary 27, 2020

The results are preliminary, noted Robin Gabriels, program director for neuropsychiatric special care at Children’s Hospital Colorado and a psychiatry professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. “I look forward to the researchers conducting a randomized clinical trial to more definitively determine if equine-assisted activities combined with their curriculum effectively improves motor skills compared to therapeutic riding by itself,” said Gabriels.

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The New York Times

Should You Screen Your Child for Celiac Disease?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateNovember 21, 2019

Because symptoms can be vague or families may not know if they have risk factors, some experts have argued that testing all kids for celiac antibodies is best. Dr. Marian Rewers, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Stahl’s colleague, regularly sees patients who, in his mind, could have benefited from universal screening.

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The New York Times

Morning exercise may offer the most weight loss benefits

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJuly 31, 2019

People who exercise in the morning seem to lose more weight than people completing the same workouts later in the day, according to a new study of workouts and waistlines. Dr. Willis and one of his collaborators, Seth Creasy, a professor of exercise physiology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, started brainstorming other possible, perhaps unexpected contributors to the enormous variability to weight loss. They hit upon activity timing.

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The New York Times

Living near oil and gas wells tied to heart defects in babies

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJuly 30, 2019

Living near oil and gas wells may increase a woman’s risk of having a baby with a congenital heart defect. “The greatest suspect is the hazardous air pollutants that are emitted during the production of oil and gas,” said the lead author, Lisa M. McKenzie, an assistant research professor at the Colorado School of Public Health at the Anschutz Medical Campus. As a public health issue, the problem is potentially significant. Other studies have linked living near gas and oil sites to premature births, smaller babies, migraines and fatigue. “About 17 million people live near these sites in the U.S.,” Dr. McKenzie said.

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The New York Times

E.P.A. Plans to Get Thousands of Deaths Off the Books by Changing Its Math

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMay 20, 2019

Jonathan M. Samet, a pulmonary disease specialist who is dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, said the most recent studies showed negative health effects well below the 12-microgram standard. “It’s not a hard stop where we can say ‘below that, air is safe.’ That would not be supported by the scientific evidence,” Dr. Samet said. “It would be very nice for public health if things worked that way, but they don’t seem to.”

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The New York Times

One more time, with Big Data: Measles vaccine doesn’t cause autism

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 06, 2019

“Debunking a myth is tricky,” said Dr. Sean T. O’Leary, a spokesman for the American Academy of Pediatrics and an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. When you repeat the myth, he said, “you risk reinforcing it. All that parents remember about your complicated explanation about why vaccines don’t cause autism is that they’re somehow linked. So pediatricians should focus on the diseases we’re trying to prevent and if you have to address a myth, be clear that’s exactly what it is.”

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The New York Times

Managing teenage acne

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJanuary 07, 2019

According to Dr. Robert P. Dellavalle, professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, “Acne is one of the most debilitating diseases in dermatology. It’s not a killer, but it can scar people literally and psychologically. If treatment can cure acne and prevent scarring, it may prevent the need for psychological services, which can be hard to come by.”

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The New York Times

In Texas, the land of football, it’s rugby to the rescue

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJanuary 02, 2019

In seizing on rugby as a model, Atavus was choosing to highlight a sport in which tackling above the shoulder is not permitted; some players wear “scrum caps’’ but none wear the hard plastic helmets used in football; and the rate of concussions is lower than in football, according to Dawn Comstock, a sports injury epidemiologist at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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