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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

Washington Post


Washington Post

What happened to Eric Clapton?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“He could be helping us in finishing off this pandemic, especially with a vulnerable population,” says Joshua Barocas, an associate professor of medicine with an expertise in infectious diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We’re looking at millions and millions of people worldwide. He could be a global ambassador, and instead he’s chosen the pro-covid, anti-public-health route.”

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Washington Post

Colorado hospitals can turn away patients as state grapples with covid-19 surge

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateNovember 05, 2021

Right now there are “two Colorados,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “If you’re in the health-care system — if you’re a patient needing services in a hospital or if you’re a medical practitioner, things are really bad,” he said. “But if you’re a regular citizen just walking around on the street, you wouldn’t know it. People are behaving as though things are normal.”

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Washington Post

In the early 1990s, heat waves battered Philadelphia’s most vulnerable communities. The lessons learned are helping today.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateAugust 20, 2021

“It’s very different when you’re on oxygen or you’re on a diuretic or heart medicine or, you know, you’re a smoker or have existing heart disease,” said Jay Lemery, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “At that point, you know, that physiological stressor is just enough to put you over into crisis.”

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Washington Post

Could my child’s clumsiness be a sign of a coordination disorder?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateAugust 06, 2021

Even more concerning, childhood clumsiness is associated with long-haul issues such as social isolation and anxiety. “Repeated frustration with motor tasks can lead to poor academic performance, low self-esteem, behavior problems and depression,” says Lisa Dannemiller, an associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Studies suggest kids with DCD are two to three times as likely to show signs of clinical depression as neurotypical kids.

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Through pain and controversy, the ‘Iron Cowboy’ chases 100 triathlons in 100 days

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJune 18, 2021

Iñigo San Millán, coach of 2020 Tour de France winner Tadej Pogacar and assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, agreed. Conquer 100 is “an aggression and a torture to the body that may have lifetime consequences,” he said. But from a performance standpoint, he doesn’t believe IVs make a difference. “The amount of calories and a good digestive system would,” he noted.

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9 questions about traveling with kids, answered by infectious-disease experts

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateMay 28, 2021

“Outdoors is better than indoors if you’re going to be around other people,” said Sean O’Leary, vice chair of the committee on infectious diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics and a professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “Less contact is better.”

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‘An accelerated cauldron of evolution’: Covid-19 patients with cancer, HIV, may play a role in emergence of variants

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateMarch 26, 2021

“The evidence points to these immunocompromised patients as an accelerated cauldron of evolution,” said David Pollock, a professor of genomics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Early vaccination in prisons, a public health priority, proves politically charged

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJanuary 08, 2021

“It’s a very stigmatized population, and there are people who say, ‘They’re in prison, they must have done something terrible, and they don’t deserve a place in line,’ ” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado [Anschutz Medical Campus] and a member of the state’s medical advisory group. But viewing the priorities in terms of who deserves to be inoculated, he said, “might end up prolonging the pandemic and killing more people.”

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