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Colorado School of Public Health News and Stories

Obesity

Research    Obesity   

Study Finds Infant Gut Microbiome Predicts Obesity in Pre-Teens

If the eyes are the window to the soul, then the gut microbiome is a window to future health. Evidence continues to mount that shows the significance gut microbiota has on a multitude of health conditions and disease states. Now, new data from investigators at the University of Colorado suggests that evaluating the gut microbiota of infants may help identify children who are at risk for becoming overweight or obese. Investigators showed that the gut microbiota composition at two years of life is associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 12. Also, the BMI at age 2 was not significantly higher in children who later became overweight/obese, indicating that gut microbiota composition may be the earliest warning sign for detecting obesity.   


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Public Health    Obesity    Awards    Maternal & Child Health

Dr. Charlotte Farewell Receives the Lorna Grindlay Moore, PhD Faculty Launch Award

Dr. Charlotte Farewell, Senior Research Instructor in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health, received the Lorna Grindlay Moore, PhD Faculty Launch Award. The title of her abstract is, "Fostering Resilience Among Mothers Early (FRAME): Protective Impacts on Obesity in Early and Middle Childhood."

Learn more about the Lorna Grindlay Moore, PhD Faculty Launch Fund on the OB-GYN funding opportunities page


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Research    Diabetes    Obesity   

Focusing on Diabetes and Obesity Prevention

While Colorado may be the skinniest state, reports indicate that our state’s residents, both adults and children, are growing more and more obese each year, while both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased exponentially in our nation’s youth over the last decade. Researchers are now honing in on human developmental periods (in utero, neonatal, and early childhood) and environmental factors as possible culprits. 


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Community    Obesity    Community and Practice    Maternal & Child Health

Promoting a Culture of Wellness in Preschools

The Culture of Wellness in Preschools (COWP) is a comprehensive and collaborative early childhood obesity program, which aims to promote a “culture of wellness” in preschool settings by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity levels. This is accomplished by bringing the following to preschool sites throughout Colorado: 


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Research    Epidemiology    Obesity    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Community Health    Maternal & Child Health

Kids with Autism at Higher Risk for Obesity

A new study including two ColoradoSPH researchers is among the first to show that children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) had the highest frequency of rapid weight gain during the first six months of life, which may put them at increased risk for childhood obesity.   


Author Colorado School of Public Health | Publish Date September 12, 2018
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Research    Diabetes    Obesity    pregnancy    Maternal & Child Health

Dabelea: Exercise During Pregnancy Benefits Mom and Baby

"Exercise during pregnancy can keep weight gain in check, reduce your risk of gestational diabetes, decrease discomfort, and set you up for an easier labor and delivery. Now, new research shows that breaking a sweat, especially after 29 weeks, has a big benefit for your baby, too."


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Colorado School of Public Health In the News

The Denver Post

“Hear/Say”, a groundbreaking art exhibition, explores the effects of high-concentration cannabis

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 11, 2024

At the intersection of art, science, and health, BRDG Project Gallery at 3300 Tejon St. in Denver hosting “Hear/Say”, a groundbreaking art exhibition exploring the effects of high-concentration cannabis. Sponsored by the Colorado School of Public Health, the show is a science-based examination that encourages conversation and open-minded understanding of a controversial subject through the artistic lens of local and national artists. The public is invited to view the exhibition from June 14 through July 14, 2024 during regular BRDG Project gallery hours. 

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Cancer Network

Learning to “Aim High” Within Male-Dominated Fields in Public Health

news outletCancer Network
Publish DateJune 10, 2024

Within public health, the field of health economics is one that has historically been male-dominated. Forging a path to find your voice and learning to stand out as a woman can be difficult. During a Breaking Barriers: Women in Oncology discussion, Cathy Bradley, PhD, and Lindsay M. Sabik, PhD, both spoke about why they chose to work in this field and how they both have had to overcame challenges hold the positions they have today.

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Healthline

Man with First Human Case of H5N2 Bird Flu Variant Dies in Mexico

news outletHealthline
Publish DateJune 07, 2024

A 59-year-old man in Mexico who contracted a type of bird flu known as A(H5N2) died in April, the World Health Organization said June 5Trusted Source. This is the first laboratory-confirmed human case of infection with an A(H5N2) virus worldwide, and the first avian H5 virus reported in a person in Mexico, the WHO said. “These viruses, such as H5N1 and now H5N2, primarily circulate among birds, with occasional spillover into mammals, including humans, under the right circumstances,” said Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS, chief of neuro-infectious diseases and global neurology at the University of Colorado and Colorado School of Public Health.

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STAT News

Smoke exposure from California’s wildfires linked to 52,000 early deaths, study says

news outletSTAT News
Publish DateJune 07, 2024

When large swaths of the East Coast were shrouded in wildfire smoke last summer, scientists in California grimly joked that maybe, finally, power brokers in New York and Washington, D.C. would be spurred to act on the burning issue that has long plagued the West Coast. Despite wildfire seasons that regularly burn hundreds of thousands of acres in California alone each year, researchers know relatively little about the long-term effects of chronic wildfire smoke on the body, and funding to reduce the known harms of exposure is scarce.

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