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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

CNN


CNN

Why you should vaccinate your 5-to-11-year-old

news outletCNN
Publish DateNovember 05, 2021

Opinion co-authored by Sean T. O'Leary, MD, MPH, professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado and serves as the vice chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatric

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In one of the country's most vaccinated places, masks were still key to slowing Covid-19

news outletCNN
Publish DateOctober 05, 2021

Talia Quandelacy, an epidemiologist with the University of Colorado-Denver and the Colorado School of Public Health, said the concept of herd immunity in this pandemic has been oversimplified and over-relied-on. "It's a useful guide to have some sort of target to aim for," she said. "But usually, if we hit a certain metric, that doesn't mean that transmission or the pandemic is just going to disappear."

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Uncontrollable vomiting due to marijuana use on rise, study finds

news outletCNN
Publish DateSeptember 17, 2021

"It's pretty universal for these patients to say they need a really, really hot shower, or a really hot bath, to improve their symptoms," he said. Why hot? "That's not entirely clear," said Wang, who is also an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado.

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The pandemic has pushed children’s mental health and access to care to a ‘crisis point’

news outletCNN
Publish DateAugust 06, 2021

“We really have never seen anything like this rapid growth in kids presenting with mental health problems and the severity of those problems. I’ve never seen this in my entire career,” said Jenna Glover, the director of psychology training at Children's Hospital Colorado [and associate professor of psychiatry at CU School of Medicine].

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Sicknick death ruled 'natural' but experts say stress can set off strokes

news outletCNN
Publish DateApril 27, 2021

"Basil or artery occlusion is a specific type of stroke that happens in the posterior circulation. This is the blood flow that enters the brain and then in the backside of your head," said Dr. Robert Kowalski, a clinical instructor in neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who does stroke research. This area of the brain is critical for cardiac function. It regulates heartbeat and breathing. "These are a terrible type of stroke because the mortality rate is close to 90% when it's not treated," Kowalski said.

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One in five Colorado high school students say they have easy access to firearms

news outletCNN
Publish DateApril 09, 2021

Still, lead author Ashley Brooks-Russell, an assistant professor in the Colorado School of Public Health, said the findings "highlight that it is relatively easy to access a handgun in Colorado for high school students. "It's clear from our findings that we need to raise awareness and improve efforts to reduce firearm access for youth in Colorado to prevent suicide and fatal injuries," said Brooks-Russell in a statement. "We hope our findings will help inform public health strategies, such as educating parents on the importance of secure home firearm storage, particularly if an adolescent is at risk for suicide."

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Black coffee can be good for your heart, studies show

news outletCNN
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2021

"The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising," said senior author Dr. David Kao, medical director of the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora.

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Stone Age Venus figurines were totems of survival, not sex, study suggests

news outletCNN
Publish DateDecember 28, 2020

Fat is a form of stored energy, said study author Dr. Richard Johnson, Tomas Berl professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and that fat can be lifesaving when food is not available, especially to pregnant women. "Our studies suggest these figurines did not represent sexual totems, or a representation of male desire, but rather as a means for providing strength to motherhood even in the most adverse situations," Johnson said.

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