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Story of the Week

COVID-19   

Who's Coming to Dinner? Sharpen the Pencils and Get Out the Calculator

Author Debra Melani | Publish Date October 18, 2021

For the nearly 190 million Americans vaccinated against last year’s holiday-crashing coronavirus, the 2021 season appears brighter. The chances of ringing in the New Year in a hospital bed because of earlier social merry-making are dramatically lower this year for people who took the shot.

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Faculty

Listening, Learning, Leadership

While any new job can be stressful, Dr. Kelly Stamp has taken on the challenge of leading academic programs at the University of Colorado College of Nursing during an ongoing pandemic, a nursing shortage and a changing profession. And the new associate professor with tenure and associate dean of academic programs is up for the challenge.


School NameCollege of Nursing
AuthorDeborah Sherman | Publish DateOctober 22, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Community    CU Medicine Today

Challenging Oudated FDA Policy

The death of a 16-year-old boy who was bullied for being gay inspired Michael A. Puente, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, to campaign to change a 27-year-old federal regulation restricting the ability of gay and bisexual men to donate their corneas in the United States.


School NameSchool of Medicine
AuthorChanthy Na | Publish DateOctober 22, 2021
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Research    Community

A Rhythmic Approach to Music Therapy for Parkinson’s Patients

The old poem says that music soothes the savage beast, but Isabelle Buard, PhD, is conducting research to find out if music can also soothe the effects of Parkinson’s disease on fine motor skills.


School NameSchool of Medicine
AuthorGreg Glasgow | Publish DateOctober 22, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Geriatrics

Leading in Prevention of Elder Abuse: CU Anschutz Boasts One of Only Two Teams in Nation

Elder abuse and neglect are major problems – they happen to one in 10 older adults in the United States – and often hide in plain sight.


School NameCU Anschutz Newsroom
AuthorChris Casey | Publish DateOctober 19, 2021
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Patient Care    Education    Community    Faculty

Study Finds Family Physicians Deliver Babies in Majority of Rural Hospitals

In the heart of a city, the distances in rural communities may be difficult to envision. The space between neighbors can sometimes be measured in miles rather than blocks; a drive to the nearest hospital may take dozens of minutes rather than a handful.


School NameSchool of Medicine
AuthorRachel Sauer | Publish DateOctober 19, 2021
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Community    Blood Cancer

Colin Powell’s Death Highlights the Challenges Multiple Myeloma Patients Face With COVID-19

In a grim reminder of the toll COVID-19 can take even among those who are vaccinated against it, former Secretary of State Colin Powell died Monday of complications from the virus. His family said Powell, who was 84, was fully vaccinated against the disease.


School NameCU Cancer Center
AuthorGreg Glasgow | Publish DateOctober 18, 2021
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CU Anschutz In the News

Healio

Youth from rural communities at increased risk for firearm-related suicide

Healio
Publish DateOctober 15, 2021

“Firearms are very lethal, so a suicide attempt with a firearm is much more likely to end in death,” co-author Ashley Brooks-Russell, PhD, MPH, director of the Injury and Violence Prevention Center at Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told Healio Psychiatry. “Not much is known about youth access to firearms in the U.S. We used a state-funded surveillance system, with a newly added question about perceived access to handguns, to look at regional variation of firearm access in Colorado and how it correlates to suicidality.”

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations rise as deaths reach late-January levels

The Denver Post
Publish DateOctober 15, 2021

For a few weeks in September, the state’s cases and hospitalizations were on a “high plateau,” and there were some indications they could be slowly going down, said Beth Carlton, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the Colorado School of Public Health. “Now we’re still stuck on that high plateau, and it looks like things are trending upwards,” she said.

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USA Today

Poor health choices are killing rural Americans. COVID is making it worse.

USA Today
Publish DateOctober 15, 2021

Last month, Glen Mays was having dinner at a rural mountaintop restaurant west of the city when a fellow diner collapsed with a heart attack. Mays, a college professor, leapt into action, clearing a space and giving the 60-ish woman CPR. For 35 minutes. "It was exhausting," he said. "I knew as soon as it happened that it would be 30 minutes or more until we got an ambulance up there." An ambulance racing up a nearby canyon from the outskirts of Denver finally reached the woman, and the EMTs got her heart beating again before rushing her to the hospital. Mays doesn't know if she survived. But he does know her chances of survival are significantly lower than had she been in Denver. "Incidents that are survivable in urban areas are often not in rural areas," said Mays, the chair of the department of health systems and policy at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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NPR

Breakthrough COVID may not be as threatening as scientists thought

NPR
Publish DateOctober 15, 2021

In Provincetown, Mass., this summer, a lot of vaccinated people got infected with the coronavirus. And the assumption was that this was an example of vaccinated people with breakthrough infections giving their disease to other vaccinated people. But Ross Kedl says there's a problem with that conclusion. “In all these cases where you have these big breakthrough infections, there's always unvaccinated people in the room.” Kedl is an immunologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He says it's hard to prove that an infected vaccinated person actually was responsible for transmitting their infection to someone else.

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