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Story of the Week

Research    COVID-19

In COVID-19 Battle, CU Anschutz Team Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

Author Debra Melani | Publish Date March 23, 2020

As scientists around the world scramble against the COVID-19 clock, searching for a vaccine that could stop the viral infection before it happens, a trio of experts on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have taken a different tack: overpowering the new mutation after it invades the body.

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Latest Stories

Research    Patient Care    COVID-19

Clinical Trial for Patients Hospitalized With COVID-19 Opens at CU Anschutz

On March 25, Thomas Campbell, MD, was in an intensive care unit where a critically ill patient hospitalized with severe COVID-19 was to be the first given an experimental treatment at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Shawna Matthews | Publish DateApril 01, 2020
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Research

World Autism Awareness Day 2020

On this year's World Autism Awareness Day, we take a look at some of the innovative autism research happening at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. 


Author Staff | Publish DateMarch 31, 2020
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Research    Patient Care

This Is Breakthrough: Dr. Dan Pollyea

“AML is usually not eradicated with traditional, conventional chemotherapy,” says Dan Pollyea, MD, MS, Clinical Director of Leukemia Services and associate professor in the Division of Hematology, “and is a source of relapse when it occurs, which historically is pretty much always with this disease.”  


Author Matthew Hastings | Publish DateMarch 31, 2020
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Community    COVID-19

CU Anschutz Collects Truckloads of Supplies for Front Lines of Pandemic

Amid a growing crisis-level shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus stepped up to collect critical supplies for the healthcare professionals on the front lines of the pandemic.


Author Staff | Publish DateMarch 27, 2020
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CU Anschutz In the News

The New York Times

Should I Make My Own Mask?

The New York Times
Publish DateMarch 31, 2020

“I still believe that masks are primarily for health care workers and for those who are sick to help prevent spreading droplets to others,” said Dr. Adit Ginde, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “However, I do believe that for limited circumstances when individuals must be in close quarters with others, a correctly positioned mask or other face cover for a short duration could be helpful.”

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s Decision to Shut down Ski Resorts Over Coronavirus Seems Obvious Now. Should it Have Come Sooner?

The Denver Post
Publish DateMarch 31, 2020

“In retrospect, it’s clear the ski resorts had a high potential to play a special role in the spreading of this disease within Colorado,” said Glen Mays, an expert on large-scale public health threats based at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus.

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U.S. News & World Report

Could Stroke Drug Help COVID-19 Patients Avoid Ventilators?

U.S. News & World Report
Publish DateMarch 31, 2020

Dr. Hunter Moore, a transplant fellow at the University of Colorado [Anschutz Medical Campus], is a study co-author. "Everyone is looking for ways to mitigate the threat of this disease, and there's a lot of investment and interest in new drugs," Moore said. "But if this disease gets out of control, those drugs won't have had safety evaluations. TPA has."

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Colorado Public Radio

Lower Your Expectations, And Other Parenting Advice For The Era Of COVID-19

Colorado Public Radio
Publish DateMarch 31, 2020

Dr. Scott Cypers is seeing four different types of more significant anxiety responses to COVID-19 in his practice. He directs stress and anxiety programs at the Helen and Arthur E. Johnson Depression Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center. The first group are people who are typically highly anxious and now, they’re actually feeling relieved, “like, ‘Oh my God, now you know how I feel all day long.’”

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