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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

Denver 7


Denver 7

Your new COVID boosters questions answered

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

Pisney is an infectious disease specialist, and she and Dr. Ross Kedl, a professor of immunology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, explained the updated boosters use the original vaccine plus some added proteins to protect against omicron BA.4 and BA.5. “Very little is actually different. All the things that were in them before are in them again,” said Kedl.

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Denver 7

Fentanyl is everywhere and treatment needs to be just as prevalent, experts say

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateJuly 01, 2022

"If you're using drugs right now, you don't know what you're getting. We have a completely unregulated supply. And so that's what makes this so dangerous on top of the fact that it's more potent," said Josh Barocas, an infectious disease physician and addiction researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Denver 7

Groundbreaking research could improve cognition for people with Down syndrome

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateApril 19, 2022

“The Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome is so important because it's the first in the U.S. to tackle research and medical care for people with Down syndrome,” Sie Whitten said. That research is now paying off with some groundbreaking results. Dr. Huntington Potter is the director of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at the Institute.

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Denver 7

Medicago's first of its kind plant-based COVID-19 vaccine authorized in Canada

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateMarch 04, 2022

“The ability to harness nature for new medicines is really, really promising,” Dr. David Kroll, a professor of pharmacology at the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy, said. Dr. Kroll has been studying drugs that come from plants throughout his career.

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Denver 7

UCHealth doctor supports booster shot for people with weak immune systems

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateAugust 06, 2021

Campbell oversaw two major clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccines at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and on the Anschutz Medical Campus. He says while the vaccines available are up to 94% effective, people with compromised immune systems are less responsive to the shot, and their effectiveness drops between 50 and 40%.

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Denver 7

Young translators at CU’s Sheridan Health Services show volunteering is a family affair

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateJuly 12, 2021

Scott Harpin is an associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing, which operates CU’s Family Health Services Clinic in Sheridan. Clinic director Megan Champion said volunteers like the Harpins are helping the clinic accomplish its mission of providing equitable distribution of the COVID vaccine. “The weekend vaccination clinics really did an excellent job of targeting people who were falling through the cracks because maybe they didn't have reliable internet or English was their second language, so it was more difficult to navigate,” Champion said. “Coming to get a vaccine can be scary, so seeing kids and families helps make it a warmer environment.”

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Denver 7

Will the COVID-19 pandemic change our perception on employees staying home when they are sick?

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateFebruary 25, 2021

There are potential economic benefits for businesses that allow employees to call out sick, according to Glen Mays, a professor of public health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health. “We know from strong evidence that taking sick days significantly reduces the likelihood of transmission in the work settings,” Mays said.

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Denver 7

Pitkin County announces COVID-19 testing will be required for visitors

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateDecember 11, 2020

Still, Dr. Glen Mays, a professor of health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health, says this strategy could work for Pitkin County. “It’s got a sound logic behind it because the main goal is to help people who may have the virus,” Mays said.

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