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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

NPR


NPR

The big squeeze: ACA health insurance has lots of customers, small networks

news outletNPR
Publish DateApril 07, 2023

Questions about the accuracy of provider directories persist. Dr. Neel Butala, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, found that fewer than 20% of more than 449,000 physician listings had consistent address and specialty area information across five large insurers' directories, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on March 14.

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A kid in Guatemala had a dream. Today she's a disease detective

news outletNPR
Publish DateFebruary 24, 2023

Asturias, an infectious disease pediatrician with the University of Colorado, had grown up pretty close to that spot and, like Rojop, he witnessed how poverty, malnutrition and a lack of medical care created repeated cycles of disease battering his community.

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Ready, aim, suck up mosquitoes: An 'insectazooka' aims to find the next killer virus

news outletNPR
Publish DateFebruary 10, 2023

"We're trying to focus on pathogens that just happen to be in the blood that the mosquito happened to suck up," says Dr. Dan Olson, a research director at FunSalud and a pediatric infectious disease doctor at the University of Colorado's School of Medicine.

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Thanks to the 'tripledemic,' it can be hard to find kids' fever-reducing medicines

news outletNPR
Publish DateDecember 06, 2022

There's a good chance you don't even need to use medicine, says Dr. Sean O'Leary, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, as well as the chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). "These medicines are not curative. They don't alter the duration of the illness or anything like that. They are essentially purely for comfort," he tells NPR.

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Patient satisfaction surveys fail to track how well hospitals treat people of color

news outletNPR
Publish DateSeptember 29, 2022

Dr. Monica Federico, a pediatric pulmonologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado in Denver, started an asthma program at the hospital several years ago. About a fifth of its appointments proved no-shows. The team needed something more granular than patient satisfaction data to understand why.

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Scientists look to people with Down syndrome to test Alzheimer's drugs

news outletNPR
Publish DateJuly 26, 2022

Joaquin Espinosa directs the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome in Aurora, Colo. He says people with the condition have a hyperactive immune system that protects them from some cancers but also leads to chronic inflammation. … Another team at the Crnic Institute is taking a different approach to modulating the immune system. Dr. Huntington Potter says the idea is to boost a special immune cell found in the brain.

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Breakthrough COVID may not be as threatening as scientists thought

news outletNPR
Publish DateOctober 15, 2021

In Provincetown, Mass., this summer, a lot of vaccinated people got infected with the coronavirus. And the assumption was that this was an example of vaccinated people with breakthrough infections giving their disease to other vaccinated people. But Ross Kedl says there's a problem with that conclusion. “In all these cases where you have these big breakthrough infections, there's always unvaccinated people in the room.” Kedl is an immunologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He says it's hard to prove that an infected vaccinated person actually was responsible for transmitting their infection to someone else.

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Sometimes Lawyers Can Improve A Patient's Health When Doctors Can't

news outletNPR
Publish DateSeptember 10, 2021

And at Colorado's partnership, a survey of patients from 2015 to 2020 found statistically significant drops in stress and poor physical health, as well as fewer missed medical appointments among its 69 respondents, says Dr. Angela Sauaia, a professor at the Colorado School of Public Health who led the research.

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