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CU Anschutz In The News

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Reuters


Reuters

Blood Cell Damage May Explain Low Oxygen Levels; Two Vaccines Show Promise in Early Testing

news outletReuters
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

Damage done by the coronavirus to the membranes of red blood cells that carry oxygen may explain why many COVID-19 patients have alarmingly low oxygen levels, according to new research. Specifically, the virus attacks the membranes' most abundant protein, called band 3, said senior researcher Angelo D'Alessandro of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Teens Who Need to Lose Weight Should Quit Staying Up So Late

news outletReuters
Publish DateFebruary 13, 2020

Obese teens who diet to lose weight may have more success if they also focus on getting enough rest, a small study suggests.The effort is worth it, though, to avoid poor sleep becoming a lifelong problem, said Stacey Simon of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora. "Health habits learned in adolescence often continue into adulthood, so learning good sleep and eating strategies in adolescence is critical,” Simon, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

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Cannabis Tied to Serious Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

news outletReuters
Publish DateDecember 02, 2019

 People with type 1 diabetes may be more than twice as likely to develop potentially fatal complications when they use cannabis somewhat regularly than when they avoid the drug or rarely indulge, a study suggests. “Cannabis is a known addictive substance, and this potentially problematic aspect of cannabis use should be assessed in patients with type 1 diabetes,” study leader Gregory Kinney of the Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora and colleagues write.

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Diabetics Who Delay Treating Hypertension Have More Strokes, Heart Attacks

news outletReuters
Publish DateOctober 01, 2019

Among people with diabetes who develop high blood pressure, those who delay getting it under control may be more likely to have heart attacks and strokes than their counterparts who manage it promptly, a recent study suggests. “Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which includes coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and stroke. Diabetes is also a risk factor for the same clinical endpoints,” said lead researcher Dr. Sridharan Raghavan at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center.

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Genes may explain why some women on the pill still get pregnant

news outletReuters
Publish DateMarch 12, 2019

“If a woman came in and said she was taking birth control and got pregnant we assumed she did something wrong, missed a pill or wasn’t using the method like she was supposed to,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We need to believe the patient and to understand that there are other things outside of her control, like genetics, that could cause birth control to fail.”

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Heart failure makes surgery riskier, even without symptoms

news outletReuters
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2019

Even so, the results confirm that all heart failure patients need to be cautious about approaching elective surgery and make sure they manage their disease as much as possible before their operations, said Dr. Amrut Ambardekar, a cardiology researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, who wasn’t involved in the study. “Patients with heart failure can be treated to (stabilize) their symptoms; however, this balance can be easily tipped by the stress of a surgery,” Ambardekar said by email.

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Doctors struggle to help older gun owners

news outletReuters
Publish DateDecember 14, 2018

"One of the realities of aging, and illnesses that are more common with age, is that our abilities change," said Dr. Hillary Lum of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. "Activities that we've done our entire lives, such as driving, managing our own finances, and owning and using a gun, can also be affected," Lum told Reuters Health by email.

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Genetic variants may be tied to middle ear infections risk

news outletReuters
Publish DateDecember 11, 2018

"We predict that FUT2 is one of numerous genes with variants that make one prone to middle ear infections, and our goal is to eventually identify as many genes and variants as possible in various populations so we can predict who is at risk for infection and requires more careful management," Dr. Regie Santos-Cortez of the University of Colorado School of Medicine told Reuters Health by email. For the study, online October 25 in The American Journal of Human Genetics, Dr. Santos-Cortez and colleagues obtained DNA samples from 609 multi-ethnic families and simplex cases with otitis media. Those with known genetic, craniofacial, and immunodeficiency syndromes were excluded.

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