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Science News

‘Forever chemicals’ may pose a bigger risk to our health than scientists thought

news outletScience News
Publish DateDecember 01, 2022

“People and communities have had significant exposure to these chemicals. If they can ID that they are in an area of significant exposure, they should seek testing through their usual source of care,” says Ned Calonge, an epidemiologist at the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora who chaired the committee that wrote the National Academies report.

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Pollution mucks up the lungs’ immune defenses over time

news outletScience News
Publish DateNovember 23, 2022

“If the [lymph nodes] build up with so much material, then they can’t do their job,” says Elizabeth Kovacs, a cell biologist who studies inflammation and injury at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

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Healthy Babies Exposed to Zika in the Womb May Suffer Developmental Delays

news outletScience News
Publish DateJanuary 10, 2020

Babies from Colombia who were born healthy after being exposed to the Zika virus in the womb showed signs of neurodevelopmental delays by 18 months of age, a small study finds. Because there was variability between individuals, “looking at a population enables one to see overall trends,” says neurologist Ken Tyler of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, who was not involved in the research. 

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Are we ready for the deadly heat waves of the future?

news outletScience News
Publish DateApril 04, 2018

The human body can’t tolerate excessive heat. The biological and chemical processes that keep us alive are best carried out at a core temperature of 36° to 37° Celsius (96.8° to 98.6° Fahrenheit), with slight variation from person to person. Beyond that, “the body’s primary response to heat is to try and get rid of it,” says Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora. Blood vessels in the skin dilate and heart rate goes up to push blood flow to the skin, where the blood can release heat to cool down. Meanwhile, sweating kicks in to cool the skin.

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