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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

TIME


TIME

Alarming Data Shows a Third Wave of COVID-19 Is About to Hit the U.S.

news outletTIME
Publish DateOctober 02, 2020

“A single and coordinated strategy might have brought us to a different place,” says Dr. Jon Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health. “Even within some states, counties may proceed independently. There is wide variation in the credence given to misinformation, some sourced from the Administration and even the President.”

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Online Therapy, Booming During the Coronavirus Pandemic, May Be Here to Stay

news outletTIME
Publish DateAugust 28, 2020

“In February of 2020, before COVID-19 really hit our country, telepsychiatry was beginning to be widely available but only sporadically adopted,” says Dr. Jay Shore, a professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the chair of the American Psychiatric Association’s Telepsychiatry Committee. “Now it’s been a tsunami. At the University of Colorado maybe 10% to 20% of [mental health] visits were over video before. Now, outside of inpatient stuff, we’re at like 100%.”

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You Asked: Should I Get a Facial?

news outletTIME
Publish DateDecember 04, 2017

Other experts reiterate that point. “As a dermatologist, I see a lot of patients with misperceptions about different creams and procedures and the whole concept of facials,” says Dr. Joel Cohen, an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado and director of AboutSkin Dermatology and DermSurgery near Denver.

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Here’s Another Reason to Feel Good About Drinking Coffee

news outletTIME
Publish DateNovember 13, 2017

Researchers from the University of Colorado medical school analyzed data from the Framingham Heart Study, which has tracked the eating patterns and cardiovascular health of more than 15,000 people since the 1940s. They were looking for previously unidentified risk factors for heart failure and stroke. They used a method known as machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence that looks for patterns in big data sets, similar to the way e-commerce websites might predict products a customer mighty like based on their previous shopping history.

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