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CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

U.S. News & World Report


U.S. News & World Report

Children's Hospital Colorado: Nationally Ranked in 10 Specialties

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateJune 16, 2020

Children’s Hospital of Colorado at Anschutz makes several appearances on the 2020 U.S. News & World Report Best Children’s Hospital Rankings, including #6 overall, #1 for Pediatric Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, #4 for Pediatric Diabetes & Endocrinology and #9 for Pediatric Cancer.

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About 1 in 15 Parents 'Hesitant' About Child Vaccines: Survey

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateJune 15, 2020

"The fact that one in eight parents are still concerned about vaccine safety for both childhood and influenza vaccinations is discouraging," said lead author Dr. Allison Kempe, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora.

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U.S. News & World Report

Not a Myth -- Contraceptives Can Cause Weight Gain

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateJune 10, 2020

"For years, women have said that birth control causes them to gain weight but many doctors failed to take them seriously," said lead study author Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz. He's assistant professor of obstetrics/gynecology and family planning at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, in Aurora.

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When Are Coronavirus Symptoms Bad Enough to Warrant Going to the Hospital?

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateApril 09, 2020

"If you're starting to feel really short of breath, coughing a lot and developing fever – especially if you've had exposure to somebody who either has had COVID-19 or if you've been in a place or situation where you might have been exposed – then it's a good idea to go to the emergency department," says Dr. Darlene Tad-y, vice president of clinical affairs for the Colorado Hospital Association and a hospital medicine physician at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and CU School of Medicine].

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U.S. News & World Report

Could Stroke Drug Help COVID-19 Patients Avoid Ventilators?

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateMarch 31, 2020

Dr. Hunter Moore, a transplant fellow at the University of Colorado [Anschutz Medical Campus], is a study co-author. "Everyone is looking for ways to mitigate the threat of this disease, and there's a lot of investment and interest in new drugs," Moore said. "But if this disease gets out of control, those drugs won't have had safety evaluations. TPA has."

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Minorities Less Likely to Get Recommended Lung Cancer Imaging

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateMarch 18, 2020

"We started from the perspective of outcomes: we know that black and Hispanic lung cancer patients tend to not do as well as non-Hispanic whites," said Dr. Rustain Morgan, an assistant professor of radiology [at CU School of Medicine]. "We wondered if there could also be differences in how these groups are imaged at diagnosis."

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Coronavirus Strikes Men, Older People the Hardest

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateMarch 02, 2020

Generally, young children and seniors are the age groups most severely affected by influenza and other viral infections, said Dr. Sean O'Leary, an associate professor of pediatric infectious disease at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "We certainly see more impact from viruses in people who have some kind of underlying chronic disease," O'Leary said. "Children tend to do better with these diseases than older adults because, in general, they tend to be a healthier population."

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U.S. News & World Report

AHA News: Diabetes, Alzheimer's Together Might Increase Stroke Severity

news outletU.S. News & World Report
Publish DateFebruary 20, 2020

Bleeding strokes are the deadliest type of stroke and the hardest to treat. What might make matters worse is having both diabetes and Alzheimer's disease versus either condition alone, new research shows. Not knowing if the people included in the study had high or uncontrolled blood pressure "makes it difficult to assess the overall health of the patients and determine whether it was having both Alzheimer's disease and diabetes that put them at higher risk for a severe stroke," said Dr. Robert H. Eckel, a professor emeritus of medicine and a diabetes specialist at the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine in Denver.

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