<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

Washington Post


Washington Post

What Are Tongue Ties, and How Can They Be Fixed?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJune 21, 2024

Maya Bunik, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and chair of the section on breastfeeding for the American Academy of Pediatrics, worries that parents may be too quick to opt for surgery, and thinks the procedure may be overused — understandable, she adds, because “everybody wants to do whatever they can for their babies, and breastfeeding is a challenging part of babyhood.”

Full Story
Washington Post

A mystery illness stole their kids’ personalities. These moms fought for answers

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateMay 17, 2024

Scientists who study Down syndrome say people with the condition live rich and fulfilling lives, but they also experience “a very atypical form of aging,” said Joaquin Espinosa, executive director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. For researchers, “that could be super-rich to understand aging in general.”

Full Story
Washington Post

Doctors weigh in on Aaron Rodgers’s recovery: A calculated risk or ‘crazy’?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateDecember 01, 2023

“When you first hear that, and you don’t look at every part of it and dive into details, from afar you’re thinking, ‘That’s very fast and too soon,’” University of Colorado School of Medicine professor Eric McCarty said. “However, as we as sports medicine physicians look into it and see what has occurred and everything he has available to himself, we start thinking, ‘All right ... it’s in the realm of possibility.’

Full Story
Washington Post

This boy was born without an immune system. Gene therapy rebuilt it.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateDecember 01, 2023

Western science and medicine have historically ignored and underestimated the traditional knowledge of Native people, said Katrina Claw, a Navajo geneticist at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus. Many people in the community have a deep knowledge of biology and heredity, grounded in expertise in raising livestock and crops passed down over generations. The Navajo clan system, a way of identifying oneself that also keeps track of kinship, is a complex genealogical and cultural system and a form of genetic knowledge, Claw said.

Full Story
Washington Post

First came a viral storm. Now we have puzzling superinfections

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJanuary 05, 2023

In Denver, Samuel Dominguez, an infectious-disease specialist at Children's Hospital Colorado and a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said the cases he had seen were "across the age spectrum" in children, noting that they may be more susceptible because bacteria tend to colonize more aggressively in their throats and skin than in adults.

Full Story
Washington Post

Congress wants more red-flag laws. But GOP states, gun groups resist.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJuly 26, 2022

Research by the Injury and Violence Prevention Center at the Colorado School of Public Health found 85 percent of protection orders granted by judges were filed by law enforcement.

Full Story
Washington Post

States and health systems activate crisis standards, new protocols as omicron strains U.S. hospitals

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJanuary 14, 2022

Colorado’s crisis-standards activation focuses on EMS — including ambulance and paramedic services — “because the pinch points are largely not in the ICU, which is what we were worried about previously,” said Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Full Story
Washington Post

What happened to Eric Clapton?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“He could be helping us in finishing off this pandemic, especially with a vulnerable population,” says Joshua Barocas, an associate professor of medicine with an expertise in infectious diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We’re looking at millions and millions of people worldwide. He could be a global ambassador, and instead he’s chosen the pro-covid, anti-public-health route.”

Full Story