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Department of Medicine In the News

Yahoo News

Signs You May Have Diabetes and When to Seek Help

news outletYahoo News
Publish DateDecember 01, 2022

"Although COVID-19 is a pandemic, overweight/obesity is becoming the most common chronic disease 'pandemic' in the world," says Robert Eckel, professor of medicine emeritus at the University of Colorado School of Medicine Anschutz Medical Campus and immediate past president of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “Obesity is the most important predictor of new onset type 2 diabetes.”

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Washington Post

8 tips to avoid getting your family sick during holiday travel

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateNovember 23, 2022

Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention at UC Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] in Colorado, said this time of year often brings norovirus outbreaks as well. “People have been talking about the ‘tripledemic’” — referring to covid, flu and RSV, a common virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms — “I’m like no, this is just the season of grossness,” she said.

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NPR

Doctors who would like to defy abortion laws say it’s too risky

news outletNPR
Publish DateNovember 22, 2022

Another example: the Texas Policy Evaluation Project conducted a survey of clinicians operating under that state’s restrictions. It found that sometimes providers avoided doing D&Cs, opting instead for a surgical incision into the uterus because it might not be constructed as an abortion. “That’s just nuts.” Matthew Wynia directs the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado. “Much more dangerous, much more risky. The woman may never have another pregnancy now because you’re trying to avoid being accused of having conducted an abortion.”

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Denver Gazette

Red flag laws are only as effective as the frequency with which they get used

news outletDenver Gazette
Publish DateNovember 22, 2022

Christopher Knoepke, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who has studied red flag laws both in Colorado and nationwide, worries the state law is a valuable tool that is being underutilized.

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The Denver Post

“Tipping point” feared as rising flu, COVID-19 add to RSV’s strain on Colorado hospitals

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2022

Clinics in the UCHealth system recorded 1,160 positive tests for influenza in the last week, which was a “huge jump” from 495 cases a week earlier, said Michelle Barron, the system’s senior medical director of infection prevention and control [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].

Connie Price, chief medical officer at Denver Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said they’re working to hire traveling nurses with experience in pediatric intensive care units, to better manage the increased need. Since young children have very small airways, they’re vulnerable to breathing complications from RSV, and some need to be placed on ventilators, she said.

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Reuters

‘Red flag’ gun laws in focus after attack at Colorado LGBTQ nightclub

news outletReuters
Publish DateNovember 21, 2022

The state has seen relatively few petitions for extreme risk protection orders since it passed its law in January 2020. One study found 109 filings in the first year. Chris Knoepke, a University of Colorado professor who has studied the issue, said data from 2021 and 2022 show a slight increase in usage. . . . “It’s heartbreaking when you hear one of these stories, and you worry that an opportunity was missed to potentially do something about it,” said Knoepke, who is working with state officials on developing training on ERPOs for Colorado law enforcement.

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CBS News

Denver to review warming center policy after criticism over outdated guidelines

news outletCBS News
Publish DateNovember 17, 2022

“There’s not a whole lot of evidence for that 10 degrees cut-off and we know that bad things can start happening to the body even in moderately, low temperatures, 40 degrees and below,” said Joshua Barocas, associate professor of medicine and infectious diseases physician at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Everyday Health

Weight Loss Pills, Past and Present: How They Work, Safety, and More

news outletEveryday Health
Publish DateNovember 16, 2022

All of the medications approved in the last decade have a good track record of safety so far, says Adam Gilden, an associate professor and obesity researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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CBS News

Colorado begins Ebola monitoring for people traveling from certain African countries

news outletCBS News
Publish DateNovember 16, 2022

“Mortality is high,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Somewhere between 40 and 50% of people who get it die. So, this is not insignificant.”

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Broomfield Leader

Could you have diabetes? Your dental health may be an indicator.

news outletBroomfield Leader
Publish DateNovember 15, 2022

“The rate of diabetes or incidence of diabetes is increasing annually by about 2 million people per year in the United States,” according to Mike McDermott, director of the Endocrinology and Diabetes Practice at University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “It’s huge and we’re increasing at a rapid rate.”

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9News

CU Anschutz launches new program aimed at involving older adults in clinical trials

news outlet9News
Publish DateNovember 15, 2022

Kathryn Nearing, [assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] helped create the program and says there is a need for more participation from older adults in clinical trials to help create more research and awareness. “Older adults are one population of the group that’s under-represented in research.” Nearing said. “What that means is the research we conduct may not be as beneficial or as useful for those populations.”

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9News

Rapids announce new jersey sponsor

news outlet9News
Publish DateNovember 14, 2022

“UCHealth provides expert medical care and advanced treatment options, but our ultimate goal is to keep our communities healthy and out of the hospital,” said Abigail Lara, UCHealth’s medical director of health equity and associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Loveland Magazine

Fall Viruses are Hitting with a Vengeance. Tips for a Healthier Holiday Season

news outletLoveland Magazine
Publish DateNovember 13, 2022

“We are officially in respiratory viral season. That includes everything you can think of from the common cold to more severe illnesses, and it has begun with a vengeance,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] and one of the top infectious disease experts in Colorado.

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Healio

More studies needed to compare weight loss with morning vs. evening physical activity

news outletHealio
Publish DateNovember 11, 2022

During a symposium on the timing of physical activity at ObesityWeek 2022, Seth Creasy, assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, discussed the results of a trial in which 33 adults completed four exercise sessions per week for 15 weeks, with one group exercising exclusively in the morning and the other group exercising only during the evening.

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Office of Advancement

Why not be fearless when fighting a global pandemic?

news outletOffice of Advancement
Publish DateNovember 10, 2022

CU Anschutz's Dr. Michelle Barron battles the COVID-19 pandemic on the front lines and keeps smiling despite the challenges.

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MedPage Today

Thomas Flaig, MD, on Novel Combination Therapy for Advanced Urothelial Cancer

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateNovember 07, 2022

In the following interview, co-author Thomas Flaig, vice chancellor for research for the University of Colorado Denver and the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, discussed details of the study and the drug combination.

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MedPage Today

Definitive Answer on Steroids for Infant Heart Surgery Falls Short

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateNovember 07, 2022

“Wow,” said Larry Allen, of the University of Colorado in Aurora, in discussing the results at an AHA press conference. “Such borderline results in medicine are common and can be challenging to implement. But I would suggest that the use of steroids based on the based on this study seems reasonable.”

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The Colorado Sun

Opinion: LGBTQ citizens are being told they don’t matter

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateNovember 04, 2022

Column by Carey Candrian, an associate professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine: “The fear of rejection and mistreatment is valid: according to the American Heart Association, 56% of LGBTQ adults in 2021 experienced discrimination from a healthcare professional. Seventy percent of trans or gender non-conforming adults did so.”

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CPR

The last two winters in Colorado saw COVID surges. Are there signs of a 3rd big wave in a row?

news outletCPR
Publish DateNovember 04, 2022

Michelle Barron, an infectious disease expert at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] said the increases come as other respiratory bugs, like flu and RSV (respiratory syncytial virus), are spreading widely. “Respiratory viral season has begun, and it’s begun with a vengeance,” she said, noting cases generally trend upward as the weather cools and people spend more time together indoors. “It’s what we see with the changing seasons, right?”

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Renal & Urology News

Higher Plant-Based Protein Intake Tied With Higher Cognitive Function in CKD

news outletRenal & Urology News
Publish DateNovember 03, 2022

Cognitive function tends to worsen as kidney function declines, Jessica Kendrick, of the University of Colorado [Anschutz Medical Campus] and colleagues explained.

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CU Boulder Today

COVID-19 is still a ‘dangerous global health threat.’ A new international study spells out how we can end it

news outletCU Boulder Today
Publish DateNovember 03, 2022

The pandemic is still disproportionately impacting vulnerable populations, and without addressing the inequities involved, it will continue to be a public health threat around the world, said Joshua Barocas, co-author on the paper and associate professor of infectious disease and internal medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz.

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The Colorado Sun

Medicaid denials for Colorado children with severe disabilities set off “sheer panic” among parents

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateOctober 28, 2022

“It’s urgent that this happen,” said board member Barry Martin, a physician at University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of clinical practice of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “For these families, it sounds like it really needs to happen immediately.”

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The Conversation

Newly discovered species of bacteria in the microbiome may be a culprit behind rheumatoid arthritis

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateOctober 27, 2022

A recently published study co-authored by Kristen Demoruelle, Kevin Deane, V. Michael Holers and Kristi Kuhn, medicine faculty in the University of Colorado School of Medicine's Division of Rheumatology, revealed an important clue to a potential culprit behind this disease: the bacteria in your gut.

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American College of Cardiology

ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway Addresses Integrating ASCVD and Multimorbidity Treatment

news outletAmerican College of Cardiology
Publish DateOctober 25, 2022

ACC's newest Expert Consensus Decision Pathway offers a comprehensive and integrative framework for treating patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and multimorbidity. The document, with a writing committee co-chaired by Larry Allen, MD, FACC and including Marc Bonaca, MD, FACC from the University of Colorado School of Medicine's Division of Cardiology, published Oct. 25 in JACC. It encourages making treatment decisions for patients based on life expectancy and "4-domains" of medical, mind and emotion, physical functioning, and social and physician environment.

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AMA

The link between childcare stress and physician burnout with Elizabeth Harry, MD

news outletAMA
Publish DateOctober 24, 2022

In today’s AMA Update, Elizabeth Harry, senior medical director of well-being at UCHealth [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] in Aurora, Colorado, joins to discuss the connection between high childcare stress and burnout among health care workers during the pandemic.

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Medscape

Worse COVID Outcomes Seen With Gout, Particularly in Women

news outletMedscape
Publish DateOctober 24, 2022

Kevin D. Deane, associate professor of medicine and chair in rheumatology research at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, advises physicians to keep in mind other conditions linked with increased risk for severe COVID-19, including advanced age, heart, lung, or kidney problems, and autoimmune diseases.

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Healio

VIDEO: Cardiometabolic health management in older adults important

news outletHealio
Publish DateOctober 21, 2022

Robert H. Eckel, emeritus professor of medicine in the divisions of cardiology and endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, former professor of physiology and biophysics, Charles A. Boettcher II Chair in Atherosclerosis at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and past president of the American Heart Association, said the first day’s focus on cardiometabolic health in older adults brought a number of issues related to the elderly population to the forefront.

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WebMD

Rebirth: Cancer Reshapes Nurse’s Life, Outlook, and Career

news outletWebMD
Publish DateOctober 20, 2022

“There are several patients exactly like Tawny who are on their way to living when they are hit with this deal-breaker,” says Manali Kamdar, clinical director of lymphoma services for University of Colorado Medicine. The diagnosis creates “a huge break in what happens in living a normal life.”

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OncLive

Dr. Camidge on Toxicities of Sunvozertinib in EGFR Exon 20–Mutated NSCLC

news outletOncLive
Publish DateOctober 20, 2022

Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, director, the Thoracic Oncology Clinical and Clinical Research Programs, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, discusses toxicities observed with sunvozertinib (DZD9008) in EGFR Exon 20–Mutated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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Steamboat Pilot & Today

Monday Medical: Exercise, mental health important aspects of survivorship

news outletSteamboat Pilot & Today
Publish DateOctober 17, 2022

“Data shows that women with breast cancer who exercise have a better quality of life during and after their treatment,” said UCHealth’s Lavanya Kondapalli, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology and director of cardio-oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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MSN

Deep brain stimulation can be life-altering for OCD sufferers

news outletMSN
Publish DateOctober 16, 2022

One of my patients, Moksha Patel, who is a doctor himself, endured this from childhood until his early 30s. In September 2021, Patel underwent deep brain stimulation surgery, a rare neurosurgical procedure that can be used for severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD, when it has been resistant to less invasive treatments.

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Nature

Colorado institute pits world-class CAR T-cell expertise against aggressive lymphomas

news outletNature
Publish DateOctober 12, 2022

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are spearheading clinical trials of cutting-edge cellular therapies to improve survival rates for aggressive cancers.

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Colorado Times Recorder

Colorado Researchers Have Dengue, Zika, West Nile Vaccines in Their Sights

news outletColorado Times Recorder
Publish DateOctober 12, 2022

These are different viruses, but they belong to a class of about 70 flaviruses in the crosshairs of an eight-person research group led by University of Colorado School of Medicine infectious disease specialist and UCHealth physician Dr. David Beckham.

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Steamboat Pilot & Today

Monday Medical: Physical health as a cancer survivor

news outletSteamboat Pilot & Today
Publish DateOctober 10, 2022

“One of the most rewarding things about our work is seeing the amazing resilience of the human spirit in our patients who are dealing with cancer,” said UCHealth’s Lavanya Kondapalli, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology and director of Cardio-Oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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USA Today

Drink 2 or 3 cups of coffee a day? You might live longer - especially if it's ground, study says

news outletUSA Today
Publish DateOctober 07, 2022

Heart Failure found that people who increasingly drank caffeinated coffee saw a lower risk for heart failure. While senior author Dr. David Kao, medical director at the University of Colorado School of Medicine's Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine, stressed the significance of this finding, he noted that more research is needed.

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Healio

Older patients with advanced bladder cancer ‘want to be active participants in their care’

news outletHealio
Publish DateOctober 06, 2022

However, much of the data around care planning for patients with bladder cancer involves those who are younger than the typical patient with this disease, according to Elizabeth Kessler, member of University of Colorado Cancer Center and associate professor of medical oncology at CU School of Medicine.

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KRDO

Healthy Colorado: Weight-loss study looking for more participants for non-invasive gastric balloon

news outletKRDO
Publish DateOctober 05, 2022

“We really want people who have an age range of 22-65. They should have a BMI between 30 and 40,” says Shelby Sullivan, director of Gastroenterology Metabolic and Bariatric Program at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “That’s typically about 30-100 pounds overweight depending on if you are a man or woman.”

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MedPage Today

JAMA Devotes Special Issue to Gun Violence

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateSeptember 27, 2022

Joseph Simonetti, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado in Aurora, and colleagues reported that 60% of firearm deaths in 2020 were due to suicide, and that among the 45,979 suicide deaths that year, 51% were due to firearm injury.

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The Denver Post

The pandemic’s not over, but Colorado and the feds are winding down the public health response. So who fills in the gaps?

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 25, 2022

It would be more accurate to say the societal response to the pandemic is largely over, said Michelle Barron, senior director of infection control at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].

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Boulder Camera

CU research funding tops $1B for sixth straight year

news outletBoulder Camera
Publish DateSeptember 22, 2022

For the sixth time in as many years, researchers at the University of Colorado lured more than $1 billion in sponsored funding and gifts….Of the four CU campuses, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus was responsible for $777.8 million in research funding, with the Boulder campus a close second at $658 million. CU’s Denver and Colorado Springs campuses brought in less than $30 million combined.

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The Pharos

Firearm Injuries: A Preventable Daily Tragedy

news outletThe Pharos
Publish DateSeptember 22, 2022

An editorial written by Angela Sauaia, MD, PhD, Sarah Van Duzer-Moore, MD, and Ernest E. Moore, MD; Introduction by Richard L. Byyny, MD, FACP.

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Washington Post

A potential connection between dementia and air pollution

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateSeptember 19, 2022

On hot days, go for a walk in the morning instead of the afternoon, when ozone levels are higher, said Anthony Gerber, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], a medical center in Denver specializing in respiratory diseases.

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KDVR

Doctors say get your flu shot early this year

news outletKDVR
Publish DateSeptember 19, 2022

Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention at UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said two patients came in with Influenza A on Sunday and one had to be hospitalized. “The big message I have for everybody is get your flu shot early this year. I know there is always a debate of should I get it early or should I wait,” Barron said.

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TCTMD

PROTECTED TAVR: No Less Stroke With Embolic Protection, but Some See Hope

news outletTCTMD
Publish DateSeptember 17, 2022

The results were published simultaneously online in the New England Journal of Medicine; along with an accompanying editorial by John Carroll, (University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora), and Jeffrey Saver, (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles), that provides a more-sobering assessment of the trial.

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KKTV

Colorado doctors predicting early flu season, severity of illness could also be stronger

news outletKKTV
Publish DateSeptember 15, 2022

“It’s going to be different than the last two years in that, the last two years, we really haven’t seen a lot of flu. This year, I think we will see a regular flu season, which may be a little shock to people, because like I said, we’ve been covid, covid, covid for the last two years,” said Michelle Barron – UCHealth’s senior medical director for infection prevention and control.

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KOAA

Should there be local concern after polio resurfaces in New York

news outletKOAA
Publish DateSeptember 15, 2022

It is the job of Michelle Barron, the Senior Director of Infection Prevention with UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] to pay attention to this kind of information. Should there be concern in Colorado because polio has resurfaced in another state?

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CNN

Walking can lower risk of early death, but there’s more to it than number of steps, study finds

news outletCNN
Publish DateSeptember 12, 2022

“By and large, I think the study is well done and it certainly continues to add to the foundation of knowledge that tells us exercise is good stuff,” said Andrew Freeman, director of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at National Jewish Health [and associate professor of clinical practice of medicine at CU School of Medicine].

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The Coloradoan

Buckle up: Flu could be early and nasty this year

news outletThe Coloradoan
Publish DateSeptember 12, 2022

“A lot of the measures used during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as masking and limiting gatherings that helped limit the spread of flu, are no longer in place,” said Michelle Barron, [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] UCHealth’s senior medical director for infection prevention and control in a news release.

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Scientific American

It’s Time To Rethink the Origins of Pain

news outletScientific American
Publish DateSeptember 08, 2022

A recent clinical trial led by Yoni Ashar, PhD [assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine] and published in the JAMA: Psychiatry indicates the power of therapies that target how we feel about hurting.

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The Denver Post

Colorado flu season expected to start earlier, be relatively severe after 2 mild years during pandemic

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

The flu typically starts circulating widely around Thanksgiving in the United States and peaks in December or January, said Michelle Barron, senior medical director for infection prevention and control at UCHealth. If the country follows the pattern set in Australia, that could mean the flu season kicks off in late October or early November, she said.

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Axios

New COVID boosters arrive in Colorado

news outletAxios
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

It’s safe to get the new booster and flu shots at the same time, Michelle Barron, UCHealth’s senior medical director for infection prevention and control, said in a statement. “Think of it as training your immune system in a similar manner to basic training in the military. You may learn to use a weapon and also learn physical combat. They are related but separate types of training meant for your protection,” she explained.

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BBC

Health Check

news outletBBC
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

Claudia Hammond hears about the health consequences of a ban on abortion in some US states for young women who develop a breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy. Professor Virginia Borges and Assistant Professor Nicole Christian from the University of Colorado explain the difficult decisions women are having to make.

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Longmont Leader

Polio outbreak unlikely but local experts still worry

news outletLongmont Leader
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

Colorado’s school and child care immunization data show that 94.86 percent of the state’s school-aged children in 2021 were vaccinated against polio. “Which is good news,” Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth, recently stated on UCHealth’s website.

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Steamboat Pilot & Today

Medical professionals urge people to get new COVID booster, flu shot together

news outletSteamboat Pilot & Today
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

“We’re going to see probably the worst year we’ve seen in a couple years in terms of respiratory viruses,” said Michelle Barron, UCHealth’s senior medical director for infection prevention and control.

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Colorado Springs Gazette

Influenza set to make an early comeback after 2-year hiatus

news outletColorado Springs Gazette
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

“This year has the potential to be a bad flu year,” said Michelle Barron, senior medical director for infection prevention and control at UCHealth. “A lot of the measures used during the COVID-19 pandemic such as masking and limiting gatherings that helped limit the spread of flu are no longer in place.”

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9News

Infectious disease experts warn of early start to flu season, autumn COVID surge

news outlet9News
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

“This year has the potential to be a bad flu year. A lot of the measures used during the COVID-19 pandemic such as masking and limiting gatherings that helped limit the spread of flu are no longer in place," said Michelle Barron, UCHealth’s senior medical director for infection prevention and control. "We also have less immunity to flu since we haven’t had the same exposures we normally have from year to year.”

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9News

‘September epidemic’ could make a comeback

news outlet9News
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

9NEWS spoke with National Jewish Health pulmonologist Anthony Gerber [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] to discuss why we may see the epidemic come back for the first time in three years. “So typically when we talk about ‘September epidemic,’ we’re talking about the return to school viral infections. This has been really different since COVID.”

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Scientific American

Most People at Risk for Lung Cancer Never Get Screened: Here’s How to Fix That

news outletScientific American
Publish DateSeptember 06, 2022

There is no one reason for this gap, according to Jamie Studts, a professor of medical oncology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus School of Medicine. Part of the low rate may be that determining lung cancer screening eligibility can be difficult for overworked primary care providers, unlike other cancer screenings that have simple age-based criteria. The gap may also be related to the stigma and fatalism around lung cancer, as patients often think they will be blamed for having the disease and will not survive anyway.

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Denver 7

Your new COVID boosters questions answered

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateSeptember 05, 2022

“This is certainly the greatest invention of our time to be able to produce a vaccine that’s safe and effective this quickly,” said Larissa Pisney, an infectious diseases physician at UCHealth [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].

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UCHealth

Her parents grew up impoverished in Mexico. Now she’s ‘a picture of the American Dream.’

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

As a child, Dr. Abbey Lara helped her family pick cotton. She then became the first in her family to go to college. Family — and Lara's patients — motivate this caring provider every day.

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The Colorado Sun

What happens when a Colorado hospital releases a patient

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

One of Sarah Stella’s patients had been homeless for about four years when he was struck by a car, the impact fracturing his pelvis and breaking his femur. The 45-year-old man had surgery at Denver Health, spent a few days recovering in the hospital, and then left — to sleep in his tent. Stella, an internal medicine doctor at the safety net hospital [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], recalled how the man described in a post-surgery appointment how much his body and his bones still hurt.

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Greeley Tribune

‘More vulnerable’: Northern Colorado health experts warn of coming flu season

news outletGreeley Tribune
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

“We’ve gone a couple of years now without having a normal flu season,” said Michelle Barron, UCHealth’s senior medical director of infection prevention and control [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “We don’t have immunity like we normally do.”

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9News

What the new booster shot tells us about COVID

news outlet9News
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

Michelle Barron, professor of medicine, CU School of Medicine: “This is what we do with flu every year. For people who say this is weird science we’ve never done this. We do this every year. Every year we look to see lots of different strains of flu circulating. Not just one. When they develop the flu shots, which ones do they think based on predictions and modeling is going to be the one we should include because you are going to get exposed to this.”

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9News

Colorado doctor leads the charge in ‘life-changing’ cystic fibrosis medication

news outlet9News
Publish DateAugust 29, 2022

Shared experience led them both to National Jewish Health’s cystic fibrosis center, led by Jennifer Taylor-Cousar [professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “So up until 2012, all of the drugs that we used to treat CF were for the signs and symptoms,” Taylor-Cousar said.

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The New England Journal of Medicine

What Dobbs Means for Patients with Breast Cancer

news outletThe New England Journal of Medicine
Publish DateAugust 27, 2022

Co-authored by Virginia F. Borges – We are oncologists; we do not perform abortions. And yet the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization will harm some of our patients — indeed, the harmful effects will become a reality for all clinicians who care for women of childbearing age.

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HealthCareBusiness News

Patients fail to understand significant terms in EHR information: study

news outletHealthCareBusiness News
Publish DateAugust 25, 2022

“Our aims were to get a clearer picture of what patients were understanding and not understanding, and to learn more about what educational tools patients would find most helpful. We’re seeing this need not just in breast oncology and surgery, but across all areas of healthcare,” said lead author Alexandra Verosky, a third-year medical student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, in a statement.

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Colorado Springs Independent

What is monkeypox – and how do we slow the spread?

news outletColorado Springs Independent
Publish DateAugust 24, 2022

“It’ll start by looking like a blister, so it’ll have some fluid in it,” says Michelle Barron, the senior medical director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “Over time, that will change. It’ll darken and have almost like a divot in it. And that’s fairly characteristic, but again, everybody’s a little different.”

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Professional Civil Disobedience – Medical-Society Responsibilities after Dobbs

news outletThe New England Journal of Medicine
Publish DateAugust 24, 2022

Author Matthew K. Wynia, MD, MPH asks, What should medical professionals do when a law requires them to harm a patient? This question has become a pressing one as physicians grapple with the implications of state laws banning abortion. When these laws directly and immediately threaten the health of patients, should physicians collectively disobey them — that is, should they engage in professional civil disobedience?

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AMA

LGBTQ+ seniors have seen lifelong discrimination. Doctors can help.

news outletAMA
Publish DateAugust 22, 2022

Despite major U.S. civil rights advancements over the last decade, most LGBTQ+ patients have lived a lifetime under legal discrimination and often still struggle to access medical care, according to Carey Candrian, an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.

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McKnight’s Long-Term Care News

Discrimination a barrier to advance care planning for sexual, gender minorities, study finds

news outletMcKnight’s Long-Term Care News
Publish DateAugust 22, 2022

In the interviews, “[m]any described clinical encounters in which acceptance, understanding and support of SGM people was not clearly expressed by clinicians or healthcare organizations,” reported Carey Candrian, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and colleagues. “The important connecting factor was a need to be assured that they would be treated safely and respectfully,” the authors wrote.

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Medscape

Low Urate Limits for Gout Questioned in Study

news outletMedscape
Publish DateAugust 18, 2022

Dr. Mehdi Fini from Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research Program (CVP) and Pulmonary Medicine, was interviewed by Medscpae News regarding the new paper published in Arthritis and Rheumatology regarding the clinical importance of Low Urate level.

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The Conversation

Fake research can be harmful to your health – a new study offers a tool for rooting it out

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateAugust 18, 2022

The best source of information to guide treatment is medical research. But how do you know when that information is reliable and evidence-based? And how can you tell the difference between shoddy research findings and those that have merit? Lisa Bero, PhD, research professor of Public Health and Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has answers.

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Randomized Trial of Metformin, Ivermectin, and Fluvoxamine for Covid-19

news outletThe New England Journal of Medicine
Publish DateAugust 18, 2022

Co-authored by Jacinda Nicklas, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine – Early treatment to prevent severe coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an important component of the comprehensive response to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic.

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The Denver Post

Colorado medical schools use live actors to teach future doctors, but the pandemic permanently changed some of the ways they do it

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateAugust 16, 2022

On the Monday after CU Anschutz’s shutdown on March 13, 2020, medical students fired up their laptops and met their SPs online for “telehealth visits.” The switch took some quick thinking from tech team members and program coordinators, such as CU Anschutz’s Center for Advancing Professional Excellence director Shimaa Basha and Simulation Education Project coordinator Tanya Russell. “Converting (sessions) to a virtual conversation took a lot of creative energy … to put it together and not jeopardize the session outcomes or what the students can get out of it,” Basha said.

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Denver 7

Why some people still haven’t had COVID

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateAugust 15, 2022

Thomas Campbell, an internal medicine doctor at the University of Colorado Hospital [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], said he thinks the biggest reason behind not getting sick doesn’t have much to do with science and will probably frustrate anyone who has been sick. “I think a lot of that is due to luck,” said Campbell.

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Fox 31 | Channel 2

Why do my fingers swell while hiking?

news outletFox 31 | Channel 2
Publish DateAugust 11, 2022

Have you ever been hiking or running, and your fingers started to swell? You are not alone. In fact, this happens to many people, especially during the summertime. William Cornwell [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] at UCHealth said there are several factors that can cause your hands and feet to swell while you hike and exercise.

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5280

What Coloradans Need to Know About Monkeypox

news outlet5280
Publish DateAugust 11, 2022

How does the virus spread? Sarah Rowan, infectious disease specialist, Denver Health [and associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]: Close physical contact. That could be respiratory secretions, close skin-to-skin contact, or from touching a surface that was in contact with a monkeypox sore. All of those things could happen from a variety of activities, including (but not limited to) sex.

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The ASCO Post

Thomas W. Flaig, MD, on Bladder Cancer: New Treatment Options

news outletThe ASCO Post
Publish DateAugust 08, 2022

Thomas Flaig of the University of Colorado Cancer Center discusses the rapidly changing treatment landscape for patients with bladder cancer….

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FOX News

Doctors push for children to get vaccinated for COVID-19 ahead of school year

news outletFOX News
Publish DateAugust 08, 2022

Michelle Barron from UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] talks about the importance of young students getting vaccinated before returning to classes this fall.

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CPR

How to get monkeypox vaccines and tests in Colorado

news outletCPR
Publish DateAugust 05, 2022

“I think it is critical that everyone understand what's going on with this virus,” said Sarah Rowan, [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine and] an infectious disease specialist at Denver Health who has been leading the system’s response to the outbreak. “There are communities with higher transmission. But anyone can be exposed.”

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5280

Inside Colorado’s Battle Against Rare Diseases

news outlet5280
Publish DateAugust 05, 2022

In November 2021, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus—which includes UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital and Children’s Hospital Colorado (CHC)—was designated a Rare Disease Center of Excellence by the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), the nation’s leading advocacy organization on rare diseases.

“We’ve been doing rare disease work and research for decades, although it’s been happening in a way that’s not very structured across the campus,” says Matthew Taylor, director of adult clinical genetics at the CU School of Medicine. “Now that we have this center designation, we’ll be able to organize all of our rare disease services and be in a better position for patients to connect with us more easily.”

Jennifer Taylor-Cousar, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], knows how difficult it is for doctors to witness patients struggling to find medications. “These drugs can be very, very expensive, and we see a lot of patients fall through the cracks,” Taylor-Cousar says. “It’s incredibly hard to watch.”

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Greeley Tribune

As monkeypox outbreaks grow, vaccine supply lags behind

news outletGreeley Tribune
Publish DateAugust 04, 2022

“So you’re not going to catch it on a bus. You’re not going to catch it in the grocery store,” said Michelle Barron, UCHealth’s senior medical director of infection prevention and control [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine].

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The Atlantic

Another Way the Coronavirus Is Dodging Our Immunity

news outletThe Atlantic
Publish DateAugust 04, 2022

Strong, punchy interferon responses are essential to early viral control, acting as a “first line of defense” that comes online within minutes or hours, says Mario Santiago, PhD, an immunologist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Even so, “I think there’s every reason to think that interferons are still going to be effective” in some form, once scientists nail the timing, recipe, and dose, says Eric Poeschla, MD, Santiago’s collaborator at CU Anschutz. The molecules are, after all, nature’s DIY antivirals.

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Atlanta Journal Constitution

Doctors push state to cover dialysis for undocumented immigrants

news outletAtlanta Journal Constitution
Publish DateAugust 03, 2022

Lilia Cervantes cared for a patient who she then befriended until the woman died in 2014 after being unable to obtain regularly scheduled dialysis. The internal medicine hospitalist set about seeking a change in her state of Colorado. It took a few years, but the state moved in 2019 to include scheduled dialysis for undocumented immigrants under Emergency Medicaid. Now, Cervantes [associate professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine] informally advises medical colleagues in five states seeking to do the same, including Georgia.

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Cancer Health

Beating a Deadly Sarcoma

news outletCancer Health
Publish DateAugust 02, 2022

After the cancer had metastasized, McNeilly’s care team expanded to include CU Cancer Center member Breelyn Wilky, who knew she had to act fast. “He had developed disease all over his body, very symptomatic, miserable, and all of a sudden his quality of life was horrible and we were worried he was going to die,” says Wilky, associate professor of medical oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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9News

Q&A: Nationwide long COVID-19 study needs more participants

news outlet9News
Publish DateJuly 28, 2022

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is one of the locations partnering with NIH for the study. 9NEWS spoke with Kristine Erlandson, who is overseeing the study there.

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Study Finds

32 years later, most doctors still clueless about the Americans with Disabilities Act

news outletStudy Finds
Publish DateJuly 27, 2022

“Medical schools are currently training students about combatting racism, and there should also be training in combatting discrimination against people with disability, also known as ‘ableism,’” emphasizes Eric G. Campbell, a survey scientist at the University of Colorado and senior author of the study. “Every practicing physician can expect to see increasing numbers of people with disability, and they need to know how to accommodate them.”

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The Colorado Sun

Researchers at CU-Anschutz are trying to crack the code on long COVID by looking at T cells

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateJuly 27, 2022

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus hope they have begun to crack the code, though, after a study focusing on T cells, the special ops forces of the immune system. “I’ve been excited about it,” said Brent Palmer, an associate professor of allergy and clinical immunology in the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the senior author of the paper. “I think it’s a pretty important study.”

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Los Angeles Times

Should you wait for the Omicron booster? Why experts say you should ‘get it now!’

news outletLos Angeles Times
Publish DateJuly 27, 2022

But Thomas Campbell, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said CDC data show that while two-thirds of the U.S. population has received the full course of primary doses (two shots in the case of Moderna and Pfizer’s vaccines, or one of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine), just under half of that group has gotten one booster shot.

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ET Healthworld

Covid variants have developed resistance to human immune system: Study

news outletET Healthworld
Publish DateJuly 27, 2022

"SARS-CoV-2 just recently crossed the species barrier into humans and continues to adapt to its new host," said Eric Poeschla, Professor of medicine, at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Denver Business Journal

Colorado hospitals rank well despite staff shortages and burnout

news outletDenver Business Journal
Publish DateJuly 26, 2022

The No. 1 hospital in the state of Colorado, according to the U.S. News and World Report 2022–23 Best Hospitals Ranking released Tuesday, was last year’s top-ranked UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora. This marks the 11th year in a row U.S. News has ranked the hospital in the No. 1 spot. Three additional UCHealth hospitals ranked second, fourth and fifth on the list.

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WebMD

VA Foster Program Helps Older Vets Manage COVID Challenges

news outletWebMD
Publish DateJuly 26, 2022

Cari Levy, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and a co-author of the study, specializes in palliative and tele-nursing home care for the VA. Levy, who has worked for the VA for about 20 years, says how medical foster homes provided care during the pandemic carries lessons for civilian clinics.

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Rowing News

Gains and Losses

news outletRowing News
Publish DateJuly 26, 2022

Paul MacLean, a professor of medicine and pathology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has carefully studied weight regain. He identifies three reasons why dieters regain weight: biology, behavior and, environment.

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Medical News Today

Eating more bright-colored fruits, vegetables may boost women’s health

news outletMedical News Today
Publish DateJuly 25, 2022

“This review builds on decades of previous work conclusively showing that a diet high in fruits and vegetables- many of which contain carotenoids, responsible for some of the vivid colors of fruits and vegetables- is associated with healthy aging and longevity, and a lower risk of chronic disease,” said Amy Keller, Assistant Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes at the University of Colorado, not involved in the review.

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CPR

More than 2 years into the pandemic, interpreting COVID-19 metrics gets trickier, especially with dashboard changes and elusive data

news outletCPR
Publish DateJuly 21, 2022

“It's not overwhelming us in any way compared to what we’ve seen at previous points in the pandemic,” said Anuj Mehta, a pulmonologist with Denver Health [and assistant professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine]. “So from a hospital perspective, I think directly related to acute COVID infections, things are going actually, OK.”

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Medscape

COVID Childcare Woes Increased Stress in Healthcare Workers: Study

news outletMedscape
Publish DateJuly 19, 2022

“So many institutions have made strides to address equity and representation while decreasing burnout, and this data suggests that attending to childcare stress will be an important part of those initiatives,” Elizabeth Harry, associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and lead researcher on the study, told Medscape Medical News.

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TIME

How Heat Waves Could Have Long-Term Impacts on Your Health

news outletTIME
Publish DateJuly 13, 2022

“While increased risk for heat stroke is an obvious manifestation of global warming, climate change is actually causing health problems today, in both direct and indirect ways,” says Richard J. Johnson, a medical professor and researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and one of the world’s foremost experts on the intersection of heat stress and kidney disease.

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McKnight’s Long-Term Care News

Older patients want more details, control of their bladder cancer treatment, study reveals

news outletMcKnight’s Long-Term Care News
Publish DateJuly 11, 2022

“We learned that they really do want to be involved in discussions of their care and to have clear expectations for their treatment,” said Elizabeth Kessler, a University of Colorado Cancer Center member and associate professor of medical oncology in the CU School of Medicine, one of the study’s authors, in a news release. “They want to be engaged early in the process and not feel like they’re waiting or wishing for information.”

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AMA

Harassment of doctors is on the rise. Here’s how to stop it.

news outletAMA
Publish DateJuly 08, 2022

The majority of studies on mistreatment have focused on the culture of medicine, not on poor treatment of physicians from patients, according to AMA member Lotte Dyrbye, senior associate dean of faculty and chief well-being officer at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dyrbye and her colleagues hypothesized that there was a link between suboptimal treatment and higher risk for burnout.

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KUNC

Four things to know about monkeypox cases and vaccinations in Colorado

news outletKUNC
Publish DateJuly 08, 2022

“The current epidemiology suggests that ongoing spread is probably more than we know,” said Michelle Barron, director of infection prevention and control for UCHealth [and professor of medicine at CU School of Medicine], told KUNC. “There is some unique properties of the current outbreak, and it's people that are having prolonged contact with people that have the lesions or are in the early stages where they don’t realize that the rash is actually developing.”

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