<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

Colorado Public Radio


Colorado Public Radio

A Blip, Not A Surge: How Colorado Dodged A Holiday Coronavirus Tsunami

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateJanuary 21, 2021

“You’re asking the question I think scientists are going to spend the next decade trying to unpack,” said Elizabeth Carlton, an associate professor for the school at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus and member of the Colorado COVID-19 Modeling Team that provides epidemiological modeling for the state.

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

Are Restaurants Safe And How Can They Be Saved?

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateJanuary 21, 2021

Colorado School of Public Health Dean Jonathan Samet and Colorado School of Public Health professor Beth Carlton discuss restaurant safety on Colorado Matters.

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

‘Of Course, It Feels Unsafe’: Colorado Prisons Face Staffing Crisis As Hundreds Of Guards, Inmates Sickened

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateDecember 28, 2020

Dr. Carlos Franco-Parades, an infectious disease expert and professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, has written a letter to Polis asking him to prioritize prison populations for the sake of public health and the wider community. Several of the state’s prisons are in rural areas, where medical facilities have been swamped from COVID-19. “It is a public health failure to not take care of these people,” Franco-Parades said.

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

If Coloradans Can’t Control The Spread Of Coronavirus, Thousands More Could Die By The New Year

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateDecember 04, 2020

“Given the fact that we've experienced rising cases and hospitalizations, there's no doubt that the numbers of deaths will rise,” said Dr. Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health in a remote update. “I hope that our numbers are overestimates, but I think we're facing a number of deaths that's far greater than we would like to experience.”

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Patients Can Now Get Preventative HIV Medications From Pharmacists

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateNovember 19, 2020

“Certainly the hope would be to stop it in its tracks — to hopefully reverse that and really get this disease back under control, because it is a preventable disease in these high-risk populations,” said Zadvorny, who is a faculty member at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

Colorado’s Coronavirus Third Wave Is Here As Hospitalizations Reach New Peak

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateNovember 05, 2020

Despite all of the dire warnings, November 2020 is not April 2020. Doctors have learned a lot about how to treat COVID-19 in six months, said Dr. Richard Zane, chair of the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We are much better at recognizing critical illness, anticipating critical illness,” he said “We are much more confident in our ability to treat patients with COVID and have an understanding of what we need to do.”

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

7 Medical Professionals Tell Us What It’s Like On Colorado’s Coronavirus Front Lines

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateJuly 15, 2020

Dr. Abigail Lara, a pulmonary critical care physician at UCHealth, is the daughter of immigrant parents from Mexico. She was the first in her family to go to college, the first to go to grad school, and today not only is she a doctor, but she’s also an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Full Story
Colorado Public Radio

Medicaid, Schools, Pregnancy, Opioids: Here’s Where Colorado’s Cuts May Hurt

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateJune 26, 2020

The state will suspend or cut funding for drug abuse prevention and treatment programs created by six recent laws, totaling about $26 million in reductions, according to Rob Valuck, director for the Center for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy. It could affect everything from public health campaigns to syringe exchange programs. “We know if there aren’t as many harm reduction services, people will invariably have to reuse equipment, they’ll be reusing needles, at increased risk of spreading disease like HIV and hepatitis C,” Valuck said.

Full Story