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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

The New York Times


The New York Times

‘Do You Look After Your Neighbors as Close as Your Crop or Herd?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateOctober 06, 2022

In 2014, a group of people concerned about rising rates of suicide and anxiety in their towns reached out to the High Plains Research Network, a public health group affiliated with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, hoping to design a mental health tool that would address both the challenges and strengths of eastern Colorado.

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The New York Times

More Children Are Swallowing Batteries and Landing in the E.R.

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

“The most common button batteries used in readily available household devices are about the size of a quarter, which is a perfect size to get stuck in the esophagus,” said Dr. David Brumbaugh, an associate professor of pediatrics with the University of Colorado School of Medicine who did not work on the new study. 

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The New York Times

Experts Say We Have the Tools to Fight Addiction. So Why Are More Americans Overdosing Than Ever?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJuly 01, 2022

In late 2019, she crossed paths with Dr. Paula Riggs, a child, adolescent and addiction psychiatrist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, who seemed to know exactly what that something was. Dr. Riggs has spent her career mapping the intersection of mental illness and addiction in teenagers and young adults.

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The New York Times

How Long Does Menopause Last?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateApril 19, 2022

Once you go 60 days without bleeding, you’re in what’s known as the late menopausal transition; from here, most women will have their final period within two years, said Dr. Nanette Santoro, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In this stage, “symptoms tend to ramp up, so if they were annoying in the early transition, they get a little worse,” she said.

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The New York Times

U.S. pediatricians say Covid cases in children are on the rise.

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateDecember 17, 2021

“Is there cause for concern? Absolutely,” Dr. Sean O’Leary, the vice chair of the academy’s infectious diseases committee, said in an interview on Monday night. “What’s driving the increase in kids is there is an increase in cases overall.” Children have accounted for a greater percentage of overall cases since the vaccines became widely available to adults, said Dr. O’Leary, who is also a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado.

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The New York Times

Here is who will vote on which booster-shot policies the C.D.C. should adopt

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateOctober 05, 2021

Dr. Matthew Daley is a practicing pediatrician and a vaccine safety investigator at the Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Colorado, in Aurora, Colo. He is also an associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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The New York Times

Parents of Young Children Desperately Seek Vaccine Trials

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateSeptember 17, 2021

Impatient parents who are seeking off-label adult shots for their children concern officials like Dr. Sean O’Leary, vice chairman of the committee on infectious diseases at the American Academy of Pediatrics. “It’s a bit of the Wild West out there,” said Dr. O’Leary, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children’s Hospital Colorado.

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The New York Times

Seeking Early Signals of Dementia in Driving and Credit Scores

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateAugust 30, 2021

“We were motivated by anecdotes in which family members discover a relative’s dementia through a catastrophic financial event, like a home being seized,” said Lauren Nicholas, the lead author and a health economist at the University of Colorado School of Public Health. “This could be a way to identify patients at risk.”

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