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CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

The New York Times


The New York Times

Medical Students, Sidelined for Now, Find New Ways to Fight Coronavirus

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 25, 2020

At the University of Colorado School of Medicine, student organizers used a GroupMe texting app, Facebook and email to mobilize not only classmates but also area nursing, physical therapy and pharmacy students. Now more than 300 student volunteers are working at nine locations in the area, including hospitals, elder outreach programs and the local Salvation Army.

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The New York Times

Who Should Be Saved First? Experts Offer Ethical Guidance

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 25, 2020

“It would be irresponsible at this point not to get ready to make tragic decisions about who lives and who dies,” said Dr. Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado.

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The New York Times

The Hardest Questions Doctors May Face: Who Will Be Saved? Who Won’t?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 23, 2020

In Colorado, Dr. Matthew Wynia, a bioethicist and infectious disease doctor, is working on a plan that would also assign a score. In his rubric, the first considerations are odds of survival and expected length of treatment. ...  “One thing everyone agrees on is that the most morally defensible way to decide would be to ask the patients,” Dr. Wynia said.

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The New York Times

Efforts to Control the Coronavirus in the U.S. Could Get Even More Extreme

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 16, 2020

“We wouldn’t go nearly as close as China in terms of making those kinds of impositions on civil liberties,” said Glen Mays, professor of health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health. “As you get further down that list, the calculus the governor or state health official will have to make is, do the risks we face justify the economic and personal-freedom costs of adopting measures like canceling large events, closing schools or banning movement,” Mr. Mays said.

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The New York Times

Can I Boost My Immune System?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 11, 2020

“If you don’t have adequate vitamin D circulating, you are less effective at producing these proteins and more susceptible to infection,” says Dr. Adit Ginde, professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the study’s lead author. “These proteins are particularly active in the respiratory tract.”

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The New York Times

Horse Riding Plus Brain-Building Exercises May Help Kids With Autism, ADHD

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateFebruary 27, 2020

The results are preliminary, noted Robin Gabriels, program director for neuropsychiatric special care at Children’s Hospital Colorado and a psychiatry professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora. “I look forward to the researchers conducting a randomized clinical trial to more definitively determine if equine-assisted activities combined with their curriculum effectively improves motor skills compared to therapeutic riding by itself,” said Gabriels.

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The New York Times

Should You Screen Your Child for Celiac Disease?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateNovember 21, 2019

Because symptoms can be vague or families may not know if they have risk factors, some experts have argued that testing all kids for celiac antibodies is best. Dr. Marian Rewers, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Stahl’s colleague, regularly sees patients who, in his mind, could have benefited from universal screening.

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The New York Times

Morning exercise may offer the most weight loss benefits

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJuly 31, 2019

People who exercise in the morning seem to lose more weight than people completing the same workouts later in the day, according to a new study of workouts and waistlines. Dr. Willis and one of his collaborators, Seth Creasy, a professor of exercise physiology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, started brainstorming other possible, perhaps unexpected contributors to the enormous variability to weight loss. They hit upon activity timing.

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