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CU Cancer Center News and Stories

DNA

Research    DNA    Awards

Karolin Luger, PhD, Honored By World Laureates Association

University of Colorado Cancer Center member Karolin Luger, PhD, a distinguished professor of biochemistry at CU Boulder, has been awarded the 2023 World Laureates Association (WLA) Prize in Life Science or Medicine.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date October 13, 2023
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Research    Breast Cancer    DNA   

Researchers Find Less Risky Way to Monitor Breast Cancer Progression

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered how to extract critical information about breast cancer tumors and disease progression by analyzing blood plasma rather than using more invasive tissue biopsies.

“This is simply a blood draw,” said the study’s senior co-author Peter Kabos, MD, associate professor of medicine in the medical oncology division at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and CU Cancer Center member. “This allows us to look under the surface to see the defining characteristics of the disease. The advantage is that we don’t need to do repeated tissue biopsies.”


Author David Kelly | Publish Date August 25, 2022
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Cancer    DNA    Irinotecan    AZD0156

Irinotecan breaks cancer cell DNA – AZD0156 keeps the body from repairing it

The chemotherapy drug irinotecan creates DNA damage leading to cell death and is used to treat colorectal cancer, among other cancer types. Now a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2019 suggests a way to make irinotecan work even better: When researchers added the experimental drug AZD0156 to irinotecan, colorectal cancer cells and models of human colorectal cancer tumors grown in mice both showed significantly more cancer cell inhibition than with irinotecan used alone. An ongoing phase 1 clinical trial is currently testing the combination against advanced solid tumors (NCT02588105).


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date April 03, 2019
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CU Cancer Center In the News

Cancer Network

Liso-cel May Show Benefit in Earlier Therapy Lines for Lymphoma Subgroups

news outletCancer Network
Publish DateJune 14, 2024

In a conversation at the 2024 European Hematology Association Congress, CU Cancer Center member Manali Kamdar, MD, discussed potential future research on lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel; Breyanzi) for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and other lymphoma subgroups. She highlighted findings from the phase 1 TRANSCEND NHL 001 trial, noting improved efficacy and safety in patients with fewer prior therapies and non-refractory disease, suggesting liso-cel's utility in earlier treatment lines and specific lymphoma subgroups.

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Cancer Health

2024 Cancer Health 25: People Who Power Clinical Trials

news outletCancer Health
Publish DateJune 11, 2024

This year's Cancer Health 25 highlights the transformative power and promise of clinical trials. University of Colorado Cancer Center member Jessica McDermott, MD, MSCS, is leading clinical trials at both the CU Cancer Center and the Rocky Mountain Regional Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Additionally, she serves as the CU Cancer Center's deputy associate director for diversity and inclusion in clinical research.

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Cancer Network

Learning to “Aim High” Within Male-Dominated Fields in Public Health

news outletCancer Network
Publish DateJune 10, 2024

Cathy Bradley, PhD, deputy director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center and dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, is a trailblazer in health economics. At a Breaking Barriers: Women in Oncology discussion, she shared insights on overcoming challenges as a woman in a male-dominated field and discussed her research on the impact of employment on cancer patients' health insurance decisions.

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Washington Post

‘Unusual’ cancers emerged after the pandemic. Doctors ask if covid is to blame.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateJune 07, 2024

A University of Colorado team lead by James DeGregori, PhD, deputy director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, found in an April preprint report that SARS-CoV-2 and the flu virus can cause dormant cancer cells in mice to proliferate in the lungs.

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