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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


The Denver Post

Fewer people died in Colorado last year, but state’s death rate remains elevated since pandemic

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 27, 2024

Colorado is doing relatively well in addressing the kinds of deaths that people can prevent through healthy habits and routine screenings, and medical advances are allowing people to live longer with diseases like cancer, said Cathy Bradley, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health. Those same strategies don’t work as well in preventing deaths from drugs or alcohol, she said. “It’s very different,” she said.

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Denverite

It’s very hot in Denver right now. Here’s how to stay cool

news outletDenverite
Publish DateJune 27, 2024

“Extreme heat kills,” said  Dr. Jay Lemery, an emergency medicine physician and co-director of the Climate and Health Program at CU Anschutz Medical Campus. “It's a force multiplier for preexisting medical conditions like diabetes or COPD, asthma or coronary artery disease.” When people with these preexisting conditions are stressing themselves in the extreme heat that can put them into crisis. When they come to the emergency room, they may have shortness of breath or chest pain but not symptoms of a classic heat stroke.

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NBC News

Céline Dion suffers 'unimaginable' medical crisis in documentary: Her doctor explains what happened

news outletNBC News
Publish DateJune 27, 2024

As the crisis continues, a close-up shot shows Dion's face glistening with silent tears as she wails in pain. In the scene, she receives benzodiazepine nasal spray, her physician Dr. Amanda Piquet, director of the autoimmune neurology program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, tells TODAY.com. It is a depressant drug that relieves anxiety and reduces muscle spasms.

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People

Céline Dion's Doctor Makes Plea for More Stiff-Person Syndrome Research

news outletPeople
Publish DateJune 21, 2024

Dr. Amanda Piquet, who serves as director of the autoimmune neurology program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and is the physician who diagnosed Dion, tells PEOPLE in this week’s issue that the disease is widely unknown — even in the medical community. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is an incurable neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system, specifically the brain and spinal cord. It’s associated with slurred speech, double vision and painful muscle contractions that can become so severe that patients lose their ability to walk or speak. 

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Rolling Stone Magazine

Celine Dion Foundation Donates $2 Million to Study of Autoimmune Neurology

news outletRolling Stone Magazine
Publish DateJune 21, 2024

The Celine Dion Foundation has pledged $2 million to create the Celine Dion Foundation Endowed Chair in Autoimmune Neurology. The announcement was made during the New York special screening of her upcoming documentary, I Am: Celine Dion. According to a press release, Amanda Piquet, MD, who is the director of the Autoimmune Neurology Program at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, will be the inaugural chair holder. 

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Elle Magazine

Celine Dion Tears Up While Thanking Fans for Supporting Her Through Her Health Journey

news outletElle Magazine
Publish DateJune 21, 2024

Dion’s neurologist, Dr. Amanda Piqué, was also in the audience. The singer credited her with solving “this mystery about my health,” which prompted a round of applause to honor her work. That night, Dion also pledged $2 million to the Celine Dion Foundation Endowed Chair in Autoimmune Neurology at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. Piqué, director of the Autoimmune Neurology Program at the university, will serve as the inaugural chairholder. “She has replaced my fear with hope,” Dion said.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Researchers Find Link Between Moms’ Experience of Racism and Kids’ Aging

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 21, 2024

Intuitively, then, slower biological aging might seem like a good thing, but that isn’t necessarily the case, said Dr. Wei Perng, an associate professor of epidemiology at Colorado School of Public Health and one of the researchers. The study didn’t look at whether the children were smaller than expected or met their developmental milestones later, so it can’t rule out immediate effects, and not much other information exists on aging in children, she said

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