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Blogs

Department of Ophthalmology In the News

Glaucoma Research Foundation

'Solving Neurodegeneration' White Paper Publication Results from Innovative Research Collaboration

news outletGlaucoma Research Foundation
Publish DateAugust 11, 2022

The Glaucoma Research Foundation hosted a “think tank” style catalyst meeting in April 2021 in partnership with BrightFocus Foundation and the Melza M. and Frank Theodore Barr Foundation. The virtual meeting brought together thought leaders from across the scientific community, including glaucoma expert Valeria Canto-Soler, PhD, associate professor of ophthalmology at the CU School of Medicine. 

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Accepted

How to Get Accepted to the University of Colorado School of Medicine [Podcast 478]

news outletAccepted
Publish DateJuly 12, 2022

The University of Colorado School of Medicine has introduced a new curriculum that includes clinical training starting in year two and a longitudinal approach to patient care. Dr. Jeffrey SooHoo, the Assistant Dean for Admissions explains everything applicants will want to know about these changes and gives the inside scoop on how to get accepted.

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Science Direct

An enhancer located in a Pde6c intron drives transient expression in the cone photoreceptors of developing mouse and human retinas

news outletScience Direct
Publish DateJuly 05, 2022

How cone photoreceptors are formed during retinal development is only partially known. This is in part because we do not fully understand the gene regulatory network responsible for cone genesis. We reasoned that cis-regulatory elements (enhancers) active in nascent cones would be regulated by the same upstream network that controls cone formation. To dissect this network, we searched for enhancers active in developing cones.

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Albuquerque Journal

Bloomfield boy overcomes traumatic eye injury

news outletAlbuquerque Journal
Publish DateJune 29, 2022

In Bloomfield, nine-year-old Gage Mangum fell on a stick that went directly across his eye and hit the center of his cornea.

Gage went to his parents saying he couldn’t see and after a trip to Mercy Medical Center in Durango, Colorado, it was decided that he needed specialty care. Gage was flown to Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora and then Gage had his first surgery performed by Dr. Lucy Mudie.

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HCP Live

Greater Risk of Retinal Tears after Cataract Surgery Linked to Better Preoperative VA

news outletHCP Live
Publish DateJune 29, 2022

New findings suggest patients with better overall preoperative visual acuity, eyes with longer axial length, and eyes with intraoperative complications were at an increased risk of retinal tears following cataract surgery.

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Denver 7

Study shows AI deep learning models can detect race in medical imaging

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateMay 24, 2022

Dr. Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer discusses a recent study found that AI deep learning models can be trained to identify race in these same medical images. Something radiologists could only determine with 50 percent accuracy. 

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AAO Newsroom

Screening for Keratoconus in Children with Down Syndrome

news outletAAO Newsroom
Publish DateMay 10, 2022

Dr. Casey Smith discusses guidelines on using corneal tomography to screen for keratoconus in children with Down syndrome. Screening is recommended not only because keratoconus is prevalent in this population, but because those with Down syndrome may be less likely to be myopic and to have lower rates of astigmatism at the time of keratoconus than those without Down syndrome.

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Neurodiem

Higher-order visual dysfunction in dementia: can we do better at recognition and assessment?

news outletNeurodiem
Publish DateMay 03, 2022

Half of the human brain is devoted to vision, either exclusively or through important connections within functional networks essential for memory, cognition, and behavior. Not surprisingly, most people with a neurodegenerative disease that leads to dementia will develop higher-order visual dysfunction at some point in the course of their illness, including the pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment stage.

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Glaucoma Today

Home Tonometry for Detecting Treatment Response in Glaucoma

news outletGlaucoma Today
Publish DateApril 30, 2022

Given that much clinical decision-making in glaucoma is based on IOP, it seems surprising that, on average, providers rely on a handful of in-office IOP measurements obtained over the course of a year to determine IOP control. Monica K. Ertel, MD, and Leonard K. Seibold, MD, discuss the use of the iCare Home to improve clinical decision-making.

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UCHealth

Legally blind woman navigates Denver art world with her guide dog by her side

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateApril 27, 2022

When you first meet Myrna Hayutin, you wouldn’t know that she’s legally blind, even though her guide dog, Gouda, gives you a clue. She says her doctors always tell her, “You’re blind, but you don’t look it or act like it.” This is something Hayutin takes pride in because she hasn’t let her visual impairment get in the way of a fulfilling life, or a successful career.

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The Ophthalmologist

The Ophthalmologist Power List

news outletThe Ophthalmologist
Publish DateApril 07, 2022

Can you believe this is the ninth iteration of our Power List – or the fifth time we’re featuring the Top 100 most influential people in the world of ophthalmology? The 2022 List includes genuine giants of clinical practice and vision research – and each one was nominated by you and then plucked from the long list of 450 names by our international panel of 20 judges.

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KRDO

Healthy Seniors: FDA approves eye drops to help age related blurry vision

news outletKRDO
Publish DateMarch 16, 2022

Instead of reaching for the reading glasses, some people are now reaching for eye drops called Vuity. "It's very exciting to finally have something come to market that's FDA-approved that we can use and that we are seeing excellent results with," says Dr. Richard Davidson, Ophthalmologist, UCHealth. "We've been waiting for decades to try and give people great distance but still maintain some near vision and that's what happens with these drops."

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UCHealth

Everything you need to know about LASIK eye surgery

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateMarch 03, 2022

LASIK is the most common laser eye surgery to improve vision. To help answer your questions about LASIK eye surgery, we consulted with Dr. Richard Davidson, a specialist in cataract, cornea and refractive surgery at the UCHealth Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center.

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Glaucoma Physician

Postoperative Management of MIGS

news outletGlaucoma Physician
Publish DateMarch 01, 2022

In minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) procedures, like in all glaucoma surgery, careful postoperative care is essential for best surgical outcomes. Furthermore, despite their improved safety profile, MIGS procedures have potential complications that may require additional attention. This article will review postoperative management of MIGS, focusing on specific postoperative considerations for different types of MIGS, as well as tips for management of potential postoperative complications.

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Glaucoma Today

Glaucoma Visionaries: Malik Y. Kahook, MD

news outletGlaucoma Today
Publish DateMarch 01, 2022

Dr. Kahook is the Vice Chair of Translational Research, Slater Family Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology, Chief of the Glaucoma Service, and Co-Director of the Glaucoma Fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado.

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UCHealth

A vision for his future: mountaineering, adventure and serving his country as a pilot

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateFebruary 28, 2022

Matt just turned 24 and already has climbed several of the world’s tallest peaks. His mountaineering aspirations remain alive and audacious. But for now, Matt has taken to the skies, earning his pilot’s license while finishing college during the pandemic and applying to fly in the Air National Guard. Making all of Matt’s adventures easier was an eye surgery he had in July of 2020.

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Cataract & Refractive Surgery Today

The Hypermature Traumatic Cataract: Challenges Abound

news outletCataract & Refractive Surgery Today
Publish DateFebruary 21, 2022

Cristos Ifantides, MD, MBA, and two other surgeons discuss how to manage a hypermature cataract and an iris defect in an eye with a history of trauma.

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Healio

Teprotumumab efficacy sustained after 6 months in thyroid eye disease

news outletHealio
Publish DateFebruary 17, 2022

AUSTIN, Texas — In this Healio Video Perspective from the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society meeting, Prem Subramanian, MD, PhD, discusses the sustained efficacy of teprotumumab in patients with thyroid eye disease.

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Daily Camera

Ophthalmologist advocates for LGBTQ+ members to be able to donate cornea tissue

news outletDaily Camera
Publish DateFebruary 02, 2022

The Food and Drug Administration recently announced it will revise its cornea tissue donation policy which prevents people in the LGBTQ+ community from donating.

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Healio

Take steps to manage pseudoexfoliation glaucoma in cataract surgery

news outletHealio
Publish DateJanuary 19, 2022

Keep the cornea in mind and protect the endothelium when managing pseudoexfoliation glaucoma during cataract surgery, a presenter said here.

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Healio

Advances may ease difficulties of visual field testing

news outletHealio
Publish DateJanuary 19, 2022

Visual field testing is important for detecting progression in patients with glaucoma, but some may have difficulty with the test process, according to a speaker here.

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Healio

Panel discusses how to detect relative afferent pupillary defects

news outletHealio
Publish DateJanuary 15, 2022

At Hawaiian Eye 2022, Prem S. Subramanian, MD, PhD, the vice chair for academic affairs and division head of neuro-ophthalmology at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers UC Health Eye Center in Aurora, CO, was asked if he had ever seen an RAPD in a cataract.

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Mirror

Mum who was blind for 15 years regains her sight after discovering misdiagnosis

news outletMirror
Publish DateJanuary 11, 2022

Mum Connie Parke hadn't seen her children's faces for more than a decade when a simple procedure changed her life. After being misdiagnosed, she found her life getting much smaller as her vision gradually declined. She had no idea how her adult daughter looked, and last saw her eldest grandchild when they were just three weeks old.

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UCHealth

New eye drops could help millions of people ditch their reading glasses

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateDecember 20, 2021

An entirely new type of prescription eye drops could help people in their 40s and 50s who want to ditch their reading glasses.

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Ophthalmology Times

University of Colorado researchers provide evidence linking extracellular vesicles with drusen formation and age-related macular degeneration

news outletOphthalmology Times
Publish DateDecember 16, 2021

CellSight researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine are offering the first evidence connecting drusen formation, or yellowish deposits that accumulate under the retina, with extracellular vesicles and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Patch

End Tissue Donation Policy That Discriminates Against Gay Men, Write Neguse, Crow, Bennet

news outletPatch
Publish DateDecember 06, 2021

Despite a shortage of people consenting to donate corneas, heart valves, skin and other tissue after their death, the U.S. bars many gay and bisexual men from becoming tissue donors.

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BrightFocus Foundation

Rise in Drusen-Related Proteins May Signal Early AMD

news outletBrightFocus Foundation
Publish DateDecember 03, 2021

Former BrightFocus grantee, Maria Valeria Canto-Soler, PhD, and colleagues at the University of Colorado, including lead investigator Miguel Flores-Bellver, PhD, have shown that retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells continually release exosomes, or nanosized cell particles, that carry genetic information and proteins to neighboring cells. Under normal conditions, these exosomes contain both normal proteins and proteins associated with drusen – the fatty deposits that can build up in the retina as an early indicator of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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Colorado Newsline

End tissue donation policy that discriminates against gay men, write Neguse, Crow, Bennet

news outletColorado Newsline
Publish DateDecember 02, 2021

Despite a shortage of people consenting to donate corneas, heart valves, skin and other tissue after their death, the U.S. bars many gay and bisexual men from becoming tissue donors. Several dozen Democratic lawmakers, including U.S. Reps. Joe Neguse of Lafayette and Jason Crow of Aurora, along with U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, are calling on the Food and Drug Administration to change a policy that says men who have had sex with men in the previous five years can’t donate tissue. The agency has already moved to revise similar policies around blood donation.

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La Nacion

Un investigador español desvela una de las causas de la ceguera asociada a la edad

news outletLa Nacion
Publish DateDecember 01, 2021

El hallazgo permite identificar biomarcadores para un diagnóstico precoz y buscar tratamientos para una enfermedad que en estos momentos no tiene cura.

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El Pais

Un investigador español desvela una de las causas de la ceguera asociada a la edad

news outletEl Pais
Publish DateNovember 30, 2021

El hallazgo permite identificar biomarcadores para un diagnóstico precoz y buscar tratamientos para una enfermedad que en estos momentos no tiene cura.

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9News

Aurora doctor fights to change cornea donation restriction for gay men

news outlet9News
Publish DateNovember 29, 2021

A corneal transplant could cure some forms of blindness, but thousands of people each year are passed up as donors because they're gay. Ophthalmologist, Michael Puente learned about the 27-year-old policy about two years ago and hasn't stopped thinking about it. 

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National Eye Institute

CU Researchers Provide First Evidence Linking Extracellular Vesicles with Drusen Formation and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

news outletNational Eye Institute
Publish DateNovember 12, 2021

CellSight researchers at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center were published for a discovery that could lead to early diagnosis and intervention of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

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The Healthy

How to Read Glasses Prescriptions

news outletThe Healthy
Publish DateOctober 25, 2021
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The Healthy

What Does It Mean to Be Nearsighted? 4 Myopia Symptoms to Know

news outletThe Healthy
Publish DateOctober 07, 2021

Have you noticed you can't read street signs as clearly, or that it's getting hard to see the football from your stadium seat? You might have developed nearsightedness.

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AAO Newsroom

Research to Prevent Blindness and American Academy of Ophthalmology Award Grants for Big Data Research to Improve Patient Care

news outletAAO Newsroom
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2021

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) today announced the recipients of the Research to Prevent Blindness/American Academy of Ophthalmology Award for IRIS® Registry Research. The grant supports researchers who want to conduct population-based studies in ophthalmology and blindness prevention.

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MSN

Once-Blind Woman Gets Sight Back After 15 Years

news outletMSN
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2021

This woman went blind unexpectedly 15 years ago — watch the heartwarming moment she got her sight back.

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UCHealth

Blind woman gets her sight back

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateFebruary 22, 2021

Connie Parke used to live in a two-stoplight town in Montana. Yet, even in a place she knew so well, she started getting lost. Over five months back in 2003, her vision in both eyes got so bad that she couldn’t work, couldn’t drive and was accidentally setting fires when she tried to light the antique gas stove in the old miner’s cabin she shared with her husband.

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Live Science

Coronavirus may infect key brain cells, causing neurons to die

news outletLive Science
Publish DateFebruary 10, 2021

The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 can infiltrate star-shaped cells in the brain, setting off a chain reaction that may disable and even kill nearby neurons, according to a new study. The star-shaped cells, called astrocytes, perform many roles in the nervous system and provide fuel to neurons, which transmit signals throughout the body and brain. In a lab dish, the study found that infected astrocytes stopped producing critical fuel for neurons and secreted an "unidentified" substance that poisoned nearby neurons. 

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National Eye Institute

3-D ROC Awards & Recognition

news outletNational Eye Institute
Publish DateJanuary 31, 2021

NEI  awarded a team led by Maria Natalia Vergara, Ph.D., Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center, University of Colorado $60,000 for developing an organoid derived from stem cells engineered to fluoresce which allows the organoid to demonstrate the cellular composition more clearly and efficiently. This advancement allows for improved organoid differentiation that can be used to screen and validate drugs more readily.

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The Denver Post

Aurora doctor is leading the push to change cornea donation restrictions for gay, bisexual men

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateDecember 09, 2020

An Aurora doctor is helping lead a push to allow more gay and bisexual men to donate corneas and other tissues after death.

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WebMD

Allowing More Gay Men to Donate Corneas Could Save Sight for Thousands: Study

news outletWebMD
Publish DateSeptember 29, 2020

U.S. and Canadian restrictions on cornea donations from gay and bisexual men prevent thousands of vision-restoring transplants and need to be changed, researchers say. A corneal transplant can cure some forms of blindness and visual impairment. The United States bans men from donating if they have had gay sex in the past five years; Canada has a 12-month restriction.

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Live Science

The new coronavirus can infect brain cells, study finds

news outletLive Science
Publish DateSeptember 13, 2020

The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 can sometimes hijack brain cells, using the cells' internal machinery to copy itself, according to a new study. The research, posted Sept. 8 to the preprint database bioRxiv, has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal, but it provides evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect brain cells called neurons. 

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UCHealth

Mohs micrographic surgery treats skin cancer with a three-pronged approach

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2020

The thing that makes Colorado one of the most attractive places to live is also the thing that makes it risky: the sun. With plenty of warm, sunny days and high elevations that increase the intensity of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, the state leads the nation in an unwanted category: the per-capita rate of skin cancer. That’s not good news. But there is a bright spot. 

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UCHealth

After a trucker crashed into a 2,500-pound bull, low vision rehabilitation experts help maximize his limited sight

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateAugust 21, 2020

In the wee hours of a morning in May 2015, a bull weighing some 2,500 pounds wandered onto I-25 south of Pueblo, Colorado. The errant animal paused, blocking the right lane of the highway, just beyond a small rise in the road.

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UCHealth

New implantable trifocal lens sharpens world view

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateJuly 20, 2020

Near the end of her high school years in the Seattle area, Jan Roehl-Anderson saw an ophthalmologist who checked her vision. You don’t need glasses now, he told her, but see me after you finish your first quarter at college. With that, she began her studies at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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Healio

FDA policy turns away thousand of potential cornea donations each year

news outletHealio
Publish DateMay 29, 2020

An FDA policy that automatically disqualifies men who have had sex with men in the preceding 5 years from donating corneas cost eye banks an estimated 1,600 donated corneas in 2018. 

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UCHealth

After cataract surgery, tiny insert delivers steroids, eliminates need for eye drops

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

Martha Eubanks noticed it first while driving at night. What should have been points of light blurred into a haloed mess. Eubanks, 74, of Denver, a retired State Farm insurance agent and an avid birder – she has 399 species on her list and counting – knew exactly what was happening.

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AARP

How Autoimmune Conditions May Affect Your Eyes

news outletAARP
Publish DateMay 12, 2020

People with autoimmune disorders — including several types of arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), lupus and multiple sclerosis (MS) — can also develop swelling and inflammation in the middle section of the eyes that can destroy eye tissue. Sometimes this results in an uncommon but serious eye disease called uveitis, which can cause significant vision loss, says Alan G. Palestine, M.D., professor of ophthalmology and rheumatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and chief of the Uveitis and Ocular Immunology Division at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center.

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People Behind the Science

544: Dr. Natalia Vergara: Scientist with Her Sights Set on Using Stem Cells to Study and Treat Retinal Degeneration

news outletPeople Behind the Science
Publish DateMarch 09, 2020

Dr. Natalia Vergara is an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center, University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus. In our interview, Natalia tells us more about her life and science.

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UCHealth

Letting light back in after accident blinded hunter

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateJuly 23, 2018

Thanks to the care team at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, Tom Essig went from 20/20 stereo vision to 20/200 vision in just one eye.

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PR Newswire

New World Medical Congratulates its 2018 Humanitarian Project Award and Fellowship Award Winners during World Glaucoma Week

news outletPR Newswire
Publish DateMarch 12, 2018

New World Medical, Inc., a privately-held ophthalmic company dedicated to developing cutting-edge glaucoma medical devices intended to alleviate the suffering of patients globally, is proud to announce the winners of their annual Humanitarian Project Award and Fellowship Award. The University of Colorado Ophthalmic Global Outreach Program was selected to receive the Humanitarian Project Award to provide advanced surgical glaucoma training in the Dominican Republic.

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UCHealth

Veteran gives veteran his sight back

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateNovember 06, 2017

About a month after arriving in Vietnam, Hill stepped on a buried land mine that blew up and injured his left arm and leg. The medics didn’t have any painkillers, so they had to dig out the shrapnel and give Hill over 200 stitches without any numbing medicine. The pain was excruciating and left Hill with post-traumatic stress disorder. To this day, he hates needles and isn’t crazy about nurses and doctors. But he likes Dr. Subramanian, whom he sees as a brother in arms.

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KDVR

Eye experts warn of long-term dangers from staring at solar eclipse

news outletKDVR
Publish DateAugust 15, 2017

Vision experts are warning of the potential dangers when it comes to viewing the solar eclipse.

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Ophthalmology Times

Growing number of devices set to transform glaucoma treatment

news outletOphthalmology Times
Publish DateJune 15, 2017

Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) is the latest development in the treatment of glaucoma. Two MIGS devices have already been approved for the U.S. market and more are in development. So are a variety of other novel devices that have the potential to transform the treatment of glaucoma.

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Fierce Biotech

Eye specialist Ocugen looks east for second-round fundraising

news outletFierce Biotech
Publish DateJune 15, 2017

Pennsylvania biotech Ocugen has raised $7.5 million in a series B round as it fixes its sights on advancing a trio of eye disease treatments into clinical trials. The new fundraising will help fund additional testing of Ocugen's lead candidate OCU300 for ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)—which has no approved therapies in the U.S.—and help bring two preclinical candidates for retinitis pigmentosa (OCU100) and wet age-related macular degeneration (OCU200) into the clinic for the first time.

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UCHealth

Chicken pox, shingles, varicella, zoster – whatever you call it, patients benefit from scientific research

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateJanuary 12, 2017

You’ve probably heard that childhood chicken pox can reemerge as shingles as an adult – in about one third of all adults, in fact, and as many as half of those who live to be 85. You’ve probably not heard that this same varicella-zoster virus (VZV) can directly cause stroke and heart attack, cognitive impairment, burning mouth syndrome, vision loss, bowel and bladder dysfunction, irregular heartbeat and a growing list of other problems – often with no hint of the excruciating zoster rash. 

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9News

‘Bionic eye' helps man see for the first time in more than a half-century

news outlet9News
Publish DateOctober 28, 2016

Raymond was born with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a disease that caused cells in the retina to slowly die. For the first 25 years of his life, he was able to read bold headlines of a newspaper, and then everything went away. Despite the darkness, Raymond says he didn’t change much.

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Colorado Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons

Governor signs eye drop early refill bill into law

news outletColorado Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons
Publish DateMarch 10, 2016

Governor Hickenlooper signed the eye drop early refill bill last night. HB16-1095 requires health insurance plans, except for supplemental policies, to provide coverage for the renewal of prescription eye drops under certain conditions. 

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CBS4 Denver

Bionic Eye Helps Woman See For First Time In Years

news outletCBS4 Denver
Publish DateDecember 10, 2015

A woman from Johnstown is the first person in the mountain west to receive a bionic eye to help her see. Jamie Carley has retinitis pigmentosa, which caused her to lose the ability to see left and right and then over time she lost her night vision and her peripheral vision. Jamie was in her 20s when she lost her eyesight.

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Aurora Sentinel

Collaboration between business, medicine may save glaucoma patients from blindness

news outletAurora Sentinel
Publish DateMarch 31, 2014

Last week, the school announced it had entered into a licensing agreement with a new biotech company, OcuTherix, Inc. to continue developing the product. Dr. Malik Kahook, a professor and researcher in the department of opthalmology who first came up with the idea to use sonic energy to help drain fluid from the eye several years ago, said he is hopeful the treatment could be in widespread use within three years.

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Denver Business Journal

CU Ophthalmology blends research, entrepreneurship

news outletDenver Business Journal
Publish DateJune 28, 2013

For one of the foremost examples of entrepreneurship and tech transfer in the Denver area, look to the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Department of Ophthalmology. The department has filed for more than 20 patents and spawned six startup companies in five years, with one of those companies expected to send a dry-eye aid to market within 10 months. Department staff has grown from 10 to 50 people in seven years, and a June 28 groundbreaking paves the way for space to grow from 48,000 square feet to 135,000 by fall 2014.

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Denver Business Journal

Anschutz exec gives $1.5M to CU eye program

news outletDenver Business Journal
Publish DateMay 22, 2013

Craig Slater, the chairman of Anschutz Investment Co., and his wife Colleen have donated $1.5 million to the University of Colorado School of Medicine. The gift will be used to create the Slater Family Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology, which will be held by Dr. Malik Kahook. Kahook is chief of the glaucoma service at the CU Eye Center.

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Denver Business Journal

Sue Anschutz-Rodgers donates $2M to CU med school for eye-disease chair

news outletDenver Business Journal
Publish DateApril 04, 2013

Rancher and philanthropist Sue Anschutz-Rodgers has donated $2 million toward creating an endowed chair in retinal diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, CU announced Thursday. The donation is “in appreciation of the outstanding treatment she received from University of Colorado ophthalmologists,” CU’s announcement said.

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Wyoming News

Resilient Elly: Rare eye disease affects local girl

news outletWyoming News
Publish DateAugust 20, 2012

When Kyla Bingham's daughter Elly was two months old, her left eye was surgically removed. Today, Bingham anxiously hopes to avoid the day Elly, now 2, may lose the other. Elly has been diagnosed with familial exudative vitreo-retinopathy, or FEVR for short. An extremely rare, unpredictable genetic disease, FEVR is characterized by a malformation of the blood vessels in the retina, the tissue that lines the inside of the eye.

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A Sweet Life

Interview With Dr. Mark Petrash, Leading Aldose Reductase Researcher

news outletA Sweet Life
Publish DateJanuary 01, 2010

Never heard of aldose reductase?   Here’s a primer:  Aldose reductase is the enzyme that converts glucose to sorbitol. Aldose reductase activity increases in the body as the glucose concentration rises, so in diabetics with high blood sugar levels,  more and more sorbitol gets produced.  Sorbitol, while good in small amounts, is bad when overproduced and contributes to many of the complications of diabetes, especially kidney disease (nephropathy), nerve pain (neuropathy), and loss of vision (retinopathy).

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Glaucoma Today

Low Vision Rehabilitation

news outletGlaucoma Today
Publish DateDecember 01, 2009

The purpose of low vision rehabilitation is to maximize the way a person uses his or her remaining vision. The effort typically requires multiple visits and a multidisciplinary approach.

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