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Blogs

Education COVID-19 Students

CU Ophthalmology Residents and Fellows Celebrate 2022 Graduation

Residency and fellowship program directors in the University of Colorado Department of Ophthalmology described the Class of 2022 as incredibly resilient. The graduating class, comprised of six residents and five fellows, has withstood frequent changes in training, hospital protocols, and personal milestones amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Patient Care    Community    Cataracts

Veteran Gains Perfect Vision After Cataract Surgery

“You can’t hurt steel.”

Phil Cusimano means it, too. While fixing his roof a few months ago, the 74-year-old veteran fell through and onto his patio – getting right up with nothing but a scratch.

Cusimano is known for his strength, from excelling in track and field during his high school days to enlisting in 1967 to serve in the Vietnam War. His kryptonite seemed to be his eyes.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date June 23, 2022
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Education    COVID-19    Students

CU Ophthalmology Residents and Fellows Celebrate 2022 Graduation

Residency and fellowship program directors in the University of Colorado Department of Ophthalmology described the Class of 2022 as incredibly resilient. The graduating class, comprised of six residents and five fellows, has withstood frequent changes in training, hospital protocols, and personal milestones amid the COVID-19 pandemic.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date June 19, 2022
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Community    COVID-19    Cataracts    Cornea

How Did the COVID-19 Pandemic Affect Your Eyes?

The COVID-19 pandemic found many of us spending more time in isolation, exercising less, and eating and drinking more. All of that caused negative effects on physical and mental health, but what did the pandemic mean for our eye health? As it turns out, plenty — from the effects of increasing screen time to skipping routine eye exams due to COVID-related health concerns.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date June 19, 2022
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Community   

The Rare Disorder That Paralyzed Half of Justin Bieber’s Face 

Pop singer Justin Bieber shocked fans last week when he posted a video on Instagram in which he explained he had been diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, a condition that causes paralysis on one side of the face. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date June 14, 2022
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Patient Care    Clinical Trials    CU Medicine Today   

Treating Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

Brigette Douglass lives by the 10% rule: To avoid losing sight of the big picture of her life, she never lets anything consume more than 10% of her focus.

This approach has allowed a full embrace of family, career, and world travel adventures while also becoming one of the longest-participating patients in a clinical trial for metastatic uveal melanoma.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date April 27, 2022
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Patient Care    Advancement    Cataracts    Glaucoma

Artist Gives Back After Sight-Saving Surgery

Philip Tarlow’s inspiration to pursue art was sparked at an early age. He recalls a kindergarten teacher noticing his fascination with construction workers, which ultimately became the subject matter of his creations 30 years later. 


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date April 13, 2022
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Patient Care    Awareness    Cornea

Winter Is Over but Snow Blindness Risk Remains

As ski season comes to a close in Colorado, the spring and summer seasons remain sprinkled with winter’s health risks. Whether you are hiking at higher elevations, skiing, or spending the day by a lake, a condition known as snow blindness could occur at any point during the year.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date March 29, 2022
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Innovation    Press Releases    Health Sciences

Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, PhD, Named Chief of Artificial Medical Intelligence in Ophthalmology

Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, PhD, has been named chief of the new Division of Artificial Medical Intelligence in Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado (CU) School of Medicine. In her new role, Kalpathy-Cramer will translate novel artificial intelligence (AI) methods into effective patient care practices at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date March 17, 2022
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Patient Care    Awareness    Low Vision Rehabilitation

Driving Dreams Come True at Age 52

By the time Karre Wakefield’s friends and classmates turned 16 and got behind the wheel, she had accepted riding as only a passenger. Wakefield was born with hydrocephalus, or excess fluid in her brain, which damaged her optic nerve and rendered her ineligible for a driver’s license in the state of Colorado.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date February 04, 2022
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Research    Innovation    Glaucoma

Gliding Into a New Decade of Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Treatment

Procedures to alleviate eye pressure associated with blinding diseases such as glaucoma date back over a century. Although glaucoma, a condition that damages the eye’s optic nerve, allows for a number of treatment options prior to surgery, including drops and lasers, research has shown traditional surgical techniques could result in higher risks of vision complications, longer recovery times, and higher associated costs. Identifying this disconnect, Malik Y. Kahook, MD, professor of ophthalmology and the Slater Family Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, sought out a more accessible and practical solution to propel glaucoma treatment into the 21st century.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date January 31, 2022
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Press Releases    Community    Faculty

CU Ophthalmology Professor Named Chair of the Orbis Medical Advisory Committee

Malik Y. Kahook, MD, professor of ophthalmology and the Slater Family Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has been named chair of the Orbis Medical Advisory Committee. A global non-profit, Orbis International focuses on prevention and treatment of avoidable blindness through training, education, and advocacy, especially in low- and middle-income countries.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date January 25, 2022
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Press Releases   

Voting for U.S. News & World Report Hospitals Ranking

The University of Colorado School of Medicine is proud of our faculty's work at UCHealth that contributes to its annual rankings on the U.S. News & World Report's Best Hospitals. These rankings are important as many students, residents, faculty, and patients consider these rankings when deciding where to train, practice and receive care.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date January 19, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Awareness

Telemedicine Strengthens Glaucoma Diagnosis and Management

For more than a decade, Tom Poindexter managed his glaucoma with drops as routinely as brushing his teeth. Catching it early, he was diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma, the most common form, in his 50s.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date January 14, 2022
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Research    Community   

Keeping An Eye Out for Diabetes

Although early warning signs are often out of sight, patients with any type of diabetes are at risk of developing diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss or blindness for people who have diabetes, but it’s not the only type of diabetic eye disease.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date November 29, 2021
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Research    Press Releases    Advancement    Epidemiology   

CU Researcher Receives First-Time Award to Support Ophthalmic Database Development

Jennifer Patnaik, PhD, researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, received the first-ever Philip and Elaine Ellis New Investigator in Ophthalmology Research Award. The gift provides independent research funding to new ophthalmic investigators.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date November 23, 2021
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Press Releases    Funding    Advancement   

CU School of Medicine Names New Endowed Chair in Retinal Diseases

Scott Oliver, MD, chief of the Retina Service and director of the Eye Cancer Program at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has been named the inaugural Vitale-Schlessman Endowed Chair in Retinal Diseases at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center, effective Nov. 1, 2021. 


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date November 16, 2021
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Research    Press Releases   

CU Researchers Provide First Evidence Linking Extracellular Vesicles with Drusen Formation and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

CellSight researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine are offering the first evidence connecting drusen formation, or yellowish deposits that accumulate under the retina, with extracellular vesicles and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date November 12, 2021
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Research    Press Releases   

CU Epidemiology Researchers Receive First NIH Grant to Study Inflammatory Biomarkers of Intermediate Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have been awarded a $1.6 million, four-year grant by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study systemic biomarkers of inflammation that signal the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date November 08, 2021
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Patient Care    Community   

Protect Your Eyes from Spooky Infections this Halloween

If you think ghosts, goblins, and vampires are spooky, then beware of the terrors that can result from wearing costume contact lenses that have not been properly prescribed or fitted. Studies show people wearing cosmetic contacts have an increased risk for infections.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date October 26, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Community    CU Medicine Today   

Challenging Outdated FDA Policy

The death of a 16-year-old boy who was bullied for being gay inspired Michael A. Puente, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, to campaign to change a 27-year-old federal regulation restricting the ability of gay and bisexual men to donate their corneas in the United States.


Author Chanthy Na | Publish Date October 21, 2021
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Patient Care    Community   

Multidisciplinary Approach Offers Unified Ocular Inflammation Management

Kathryn Mayer was sitting outside with friends one evening when she experienced a strange sensation that caused her right eye to feel very blurry. She went to bed that night thinking it must be an issue with her contact lenses and carried on normally the next day.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date September 30, 2021
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Patient Care    Clinical Research   

Newly Approved Alzheimer’s Drug Spurs Hope and Controversy

As controversy swirls around the first disease-modifying Alzheimer’s drug ever approved, top experts at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus see the move – for the most part – as a step forward.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date June 15, 2021
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Research    COVID-19   

Researchers Delve Into Why COVID-19 Targets the Sense of Smell

Diego Restrepo, PhD, professor of cell and developmental biology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is leading a National Institutes of Health-funded grant into why people infected with SARS-CoV-2 often lose their sense of smell. It’s frequently one of the first symptoms of the infection.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date March 23, 2021
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Research    Press Releases   

CU Researchers Win Prize from National Eye Institute

Natalia Vergara, PhD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has been awarded a 3D ROC prize by the National Eye Institute (NEI) for her research team’s work to create better models to accelerate the development of new therapies for retinal diseases.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date February 03, 2021
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Patient Care    COVID-19   

CU Anschutz Experts Break COVID-19 Effects Down by Body Part

During the months-long pandemic, healthcare providers have seen a lot of things, often on levels they have never seen before. From brain fog and loss of smell to leg clots and purple toes, what began as a mysterious pulmonary disease has shown the world that its destructive powers far transcend the lungs.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date January 21, 2021
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Research    Press Releases   

Outdated Corneal Donation Policies Prevent Sight-Restoring Surgery

Some forms of blindness and visual impairment can be cured with a corneal transplant surgery using donated eye tissue. However, federal regulations in the United States and Canada severely restrict the ability of sexually active gay and bisexual men from donating their eye tissue.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date September 24, 2020
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Patient Care    Community   

5280 Magazine Top Doctors Includes More Than 160 CU Faculty

Each year, Denver-area magazine 5280 publishes its list of top doctors. The annual list was recently released, and year after year, our CU School of Medicine faculty members were ranked among the best. We're proud to congratulate the more than 160 CU School of Medicine faculty members honored with the title top doctor.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date August 12, 2020
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Research    Press Releases    COVID-19   

CU Anschutz Researchers Win Grant to Study COVID-19 Impact on Sense of Smell

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have won a grant to study why many infected with COVID-19 lose their sense of smell.


Author David Kelly | Publish Date July 21, 2020
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Press Releases   

CU Anschutz Awarded Grant to Drive Commercialization of Academic Discoveries

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has been awarded $4 million over the next four years from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Evaluation and Commercialization Hubs (REACH) grant. As a result, the university is now part of a national network of research institutions sharing best practices around commercialization of academic discoveries.


Author Staff | Publish Date October 23, 2019
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Press Releases   

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus launches first-ever national marketing campaign

United by a mission to remove barriers, advance research and improve lives, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus with its hospital partners, Children’s Hospital Colorado and UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, today launched its first-ever marketing campaign: This Is Breakthrough.


Author Staff | Publish Date September 30, 2019
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Campus Life   

This is BREAKTHROUGH: Telling our story to the world

When an academic medical campus attracts the best minds in science and unleashes them on the biggest challenges in health care, barriers simply don’t stand a chance.


Author Staff | Publish Date September 15, 2019
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Innovation   

AI Offers Real-World Benefits to Healthcare

In contrast to the science fiction portrayal of evil computers plotting to overthrow humankind, artificial intelligence (AI) in fact seems poised to help improve human health in a multitude of ways, including flagging suspicious moles for dermatologist follow-up, monitoring blood volume in military field personnel and tracking flu outbreaks via Twitter.


Author Guest Contributor | Publish Date September 03, 2019
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Canto-Soler brings visionary aspirations to Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine

When Valeria Canto-Soler, Ph.D., was a biology student in Argentina, she dreamed of a career studying elephants and other African wildlife in their natural habitat.


Author Kathleen Bohland | Publish Date August 30, 2017
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MS, macular degeneration and nanoparticle researchers win Gates grants

The Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and CU Innovations have awarded three researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus $350,000 grants with the hope they will strike scientific gold.


Author Michael Davidson | Publish Date April 18, 2017
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CU designed device performs safer cataract surgery

AURORA, Colo. – A new device designed to perform safer, more effective cataract surgery is going on the market following a licensing agreement between the University of Colorado and Mile High Ophthalmics LLC.


Author Staff | Publish Date January 26, 2015
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Patent granted for novel antibody-based approach to prevent or treat Type 1 Diabetes

The CU Technology Transfer Office reports researchers from CU Anschutz have been granted two new patents.


Author Danielle Zieg | Publish Date April 14, 2014
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Agreement to commercialize implantable glaucoma treatment device

AURORA, Colo.– Galaxy Ophthalmics and CU have completed an exclusive option agreement to allow the company to commercialize an implantable medical device to help prevent loss of vision resulting from glaucoma.


Author Staff | Publish Date November 04, 2013
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See Us In the News

Denver 7

Study shows AI deep learning models can detect race in medical imaging

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateMay 24, 2022

Dr. Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer discusses a recent study found that AI deep learning models can be trained to identify race in these same medical images. Something radiologists could only determine with 50 percent accuracy. 

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AAO Newsroom

Screening for Keratoconus in Children with Down Syndrome

news outletAAO Newsroom
Publish DateMay 10, 2022

Dr. Casey Smith discusses guidelines on using corneal tomography to screen for keratoconus in children with Down syndrome. Screening is recommended not only because keratoconus is prevalent in this population, but because those with Down syndrome may be less likely to be myopic and to have lower rates of astigmatism at the time of keratoconus than those without Down syndrome.

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Neurodiem

Higher-order visual dysfunction in dementia: can we do better at recognition and assessment?

news outletNeurodiem
Publish DateMay 03, 2022

Half of the human brain is devoted to vision, either exclusively or through important connections within functional networks essential for memory, cognition, and behavior. Not surprisingly, most people with a neurodegenerative disease that leads to dementia will develop higher-order visual dysfunction at some point in the course of their illness, including the pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment stage.

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Glaucoma Today

Home Tonometry for Detecting Treatment Response in Glaucoma

news outletGlaucoma Today
Publish DateApril 30, 2022

Given that much clinical decision-making in glaucoma is based on IOP, it seems surprising that, on average, providers rely on a handful of in-office IOP measurements obtained over the course of a year to determine IOP control. Monica K. Ertel, MD, and Leonard K. Seibold, MD, discuss the use of the iCare Home to improve clinical decision-making.

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