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CU Cancer Center News and Stories

Leukemia

Research    Pediatric Cancer    Leukemia

CU Cancer Center Member M. Eric Kohler, MD, PhD, Receives Award to Develop Immunotherapy Treatment for Pediatric Leukemia

University of Colorado Cancer Center member M. Eric Kohler, MD, PhD, was awarded a three-year, $270,650 Young Investigator Grant from CureSearch for Children’s Cancer, in partnership with the SebastianStrong Foundation, to develop a new treatment approach for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a rare blood cancer in children.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date September 17, 2021
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Patient Care    Blood Cancer    Leukemia

Norm MacDonald’s Death Puts Spotlight on Acute Leukemia

Comedian and former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Norm MacDonald died Tuesday, after what his brother, Neil MacDonald, described as a nine-year battle with acute leukemia. Norm MacDonald, known for his intelligence and sarcastic wit, was 61.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date September 16, 2021
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Patient Care    Blood Cancer    Leukemia    Magazine    Clinical Trials

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Won’t Slow World Champion Triathlete Down

Siri Lindley couldn’t swim. She had never learned how and the idea of competing in a triathlon seemed completely out of the question.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date May 16, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Pediatric Cancer    Blood Cancer    Leukemia    Magazine

CU Cancer Center Researcher and Physician Poses Double Threat to Pediatric Cancer

M. Eric Kohler’s commitment to both cancer research — particularly CAR T-cell therapy — and clinical care make him a double threat when it comes to battling pediatric blood cancer.   


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date March 26, 2021
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Research    Blood Cancer    Leukemia    Magazine

CU Cancer Center Leukemia Researcher Receives NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

Craig Jordan, PhD, has spent more than 20 years developing better treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a rapidly progressing cancer of the blood and bone marrow that can spread to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen and central nervous system.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date November 23, 2020
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Research    Blood Cancer    Leukemia    Magazine

CU Cancer Center study leads to FDA approval of new treatment for AML

Thanks in large part to early work by investigators at the CU Cancer Center, patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a new treatment option that has fewer side effects and has been shown to increase longevity.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date November 10, 2020
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Patient Care    Community    Faculty    Leukemia

Getting to the Root of Leukemia

The day before Joel Rutstein planned to leave for a week-long trip to Hawaii with his wife, Barbara, and their grown children, an oncologist in Fort Collins gave Joel bad news.


Author Garth Sundem | Publish Date January 03, 2019
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Patient Care    Leukemia    Clinical Trials

91 Percent Response Rate for Venetoclax Against Newly Diagnosed AML in Older Adults

Clinical trial results published in the journal Nature Medicine show 91 percent response rate to the combination of venetoclax with azacitidine in older adults newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Of 33 patients given combination venetoclax and azacitidine, 20 experienced a complete response (aka complete remission) and eight experienced a complete response but with continued low blood counts. Of the three patients who did not respond to treatment, two discontinued the study before the first week due to personal reasons unrelated to treatment or side-effects.


Author Garth Sundem | Publish Date November 29, 2018
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Research    Leukemia    Cancer

Cancer Hijacks the Microbiome to Glut Itself on Glucose

Cancer needs energy to drive its out-of-control growth. It gets energy in the form of glucose, in fact consuming so much glucose that one method for imaging cancer simply looks for areas of extreme glucose consumption – where there is consumption, there is cancer. But how does cancer get this glucose? A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Cancer Cell shows that leukemia undercuts the ability of normal cells to consume glucose, thus leaving more glucose available to feed its own growth.


Author Garth Sundem | Publish Date September 28, 2018
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CU Cancer Center In the News

5280

No, Sun Exposure Is Not the Secret to Living Longer (Probably)

news outlet5280
Publish DateJanuary 05, 2022

CU Cancer Center member Neil Box, MD, separates fact from pseudoscience when it comes to protecting yourself from the sun.

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Denver 7

'I'm Just so Proud of Him': Crested Butte Family Shares 2-year-old's Journey with Kidney Cancer

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateDecember 23, 2021

In 2021, a Crested Butte family received a life-changing diagnosis. During the holiday season, their story is an apparent reminder that sometimes the best gifts are never found under a tree.

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Cure Today

Triplet Regimen Extends Time Before Brain, Spinal Cord Metastases Worsen in Patients with Breast Cancer

news outletCure Today
Publish DateDecember 15, 2021

A three-drug regimen was shown to lengthen the amount of time before cancer progressed to the central nervous system — known as central nervous system progression-free survival — in certain patients with breast cancer.

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Healio

Liso-cel Significantly Improves Outcomes in Second-Line DLBCL

news outletHealio
Publish DateDecember 11, 2021

Second-line lisocabtagene maraleucel more than quadrupled EFS compared with standard therapy for patients with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma, according to study results presented at ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition.

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