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CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

The Denver Post


The Denver Post

Kids and COVID-19: What Experts Do (And Do Not) Know About How the Virus Affects Children

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJuly 24, 2020

“What happens in schools is going to be reflective of the broader community no matter how good a job we do in implementing the mitigation measures,” said Dr. Sean O’Leary, professor and pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Colorado’s School of Medicine in Aurora. “If we see that in mid-August we are seeing similar levels of disease to what we’re seeing in Texas and Arizona, I don’t know that it’s safe to open schools at that point because there’s so much virus circulating.”

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The Denver Post

Colorado Epidemiologist Has Faith in NBA’s Orlando Bubble, But Should the League be Returning at All?

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJuly 10, 2020

“We’re talking about degrees of risk in all these things, and I think sometimes that gets lost,” said Dr. Lisa Miller, a professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health. “It’s not like there’s a black-and-white line between you’re either over 65 and you’re at risk or you’re under 65 and you’re not.”

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The Denver Post

Second Lady Karen Pence Meets with Artsy Veterans in Aurora

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 26, 2020

Second lady Karen Pence stopped in Aurora on Thursday to meet military veterans and hear about an art therapy program at the Anschutz Medical Campus. Pence, a former art teacher and the wife of Vice President Mike Pence, heard from three veterans, their families and experts at the Marcus Institute for Brain Health, which cares for and researches traumatic brain injuries, primarily in veterans.

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The Denver Post

Many Health Officials Are OK With Police Protests Despite COVID-19

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 15, 2020

Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, said while protesting during a pandemic is not optimum timing, people can’t choose the moment when an officer-involved killing will trigger anger and rage. Several medical students and residents from the school signed the letter praising the recent protests. “People want to make their voices heard at this moment,” he said. “I’m not going to urge people not to gather. But I would not say these protests are risk-free. It’s an individual decision.”

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The Denver Post

Can I Take a Summer Vacation During the Pandemic? Here Are a Few Things to Consider.

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 15, 2020

For example, pools, smaller lakes and beaches are more likely to have large crowds, so travelers should look at going when there are likely to be fewer people, said Glen Mays, a professor of health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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The Denver Post

Denver Public Schools Likely to Require Students to Wear Masks When Classes Resume

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 04, 2020

“It is essential that we take these new precautions and make every effort to maximize the academic progress and social and emotional development for our kids,” Steve Federico, a pediatric and school programs specialist with Denver Health [and CU School of Medicine], said in a video outlining the district’s proposed changes.

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The Denver Post

Joining Crowds of Denver Protesters Brings Risk of COVID-19 Exposure. Here’s How to Protect Yourself — and When to Get Tested.

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 04, 2020

“The use of any agent that’s going to generate a lot of coughing among people that are in dense group settings, when people are in close proximity, that’s absolutely going to elevate risks considerably,” said Glen Mays, a professor of health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Doctors Using Donated Plasma to Treat Coronavirus Patients

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

Patients also have to be at least 18 and able to understand that the treatment is experimental, said Dr. David Beckham, an associate professor in the infectious diseases division on the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus. People who have had previous bad reactions to plasma therapies or who have a condition that make receiving more fluid dangerous, like a severe heart or kidney problem, might not qualify.

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