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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


Scientific American

The Colon Cancer Conundrum

news outletScientific American
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“That’s not because there is something biologically different between 49- and 50-year-olds,” says Swati G. Patel, a gastroenterologist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, who was not involved in the study. Rather it is because when people start getting screened, cancers they may have had for years are detected.

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations dropped over the weekend. A blip or the start of a trend?

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

The last time that hospitalizations dropped for three days in a row was Oct. 7-9. They promptly rebounded and rose for the next month, though. It’s too early to know whether the same thing will happen now, said Dr. Jon Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health. “If you’re the 100% optimist, it’s a glimmer” of hope, he said. “We’ve seen this bouncing around before.”

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NBC News

Routine childhood vaccinations lag as experts push to catch up

news outletNBC News
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“We’re still not back to where we need to be,” said Dr. Sean O’Leary, a pediatric infectious disease doctor at Children’s Hospital Colorado and a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Routine immunizations protect children against 16 infectious diseases, including measles, diphtheria and chickenpox, and inhibit transmission to the community. The rollout of Covid shots for younger kids is an opportunity to catch up on routine vaccinations, O’Leary said, adding that children can get the vaccines together. 

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Washington Post

What happened to Eric Clapton?

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“He could be helping us in finishing off this pandemic, especially with a vulnerable population,” says Joshua Barocas, an associate professor of medicine with an expertise in infectious diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We’re looking at millions and millions of people worldwide. He could be a global ambassador, and instead he’s chosen the pro-covid, anti-public-health route.”

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The Atlantic

How Easily Can Vaccinated People Spread COVID?

news outletThe Atlantic
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

Some recent research shows that even once they’ve been infected, the vaccinated are less likely to spread the coronavirus than the unvaccinated. “We’re back in this category of, Yeah, it can happen, but it seems to be a very rare event,” Ross Kedl, an immunology professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, told me.

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USA Today

US Army vet was rejected from multiple elder care homes. She says it's because she's transgender.

news outletUSA Today
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

“Especially for the older LGBT community, who grew up when being gay was dangerous, or even illegal, to stay safe they had to develop this silence about who they are,” said Carey Candrian, an LGBTQ elder-care expert and associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “That stays with them, despite growing acceptance and new laws. They’re fearful to disclose their identity.”

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PBS News Hour

Colorado hospitals overwhelmed by young, ‘dramatically ill’ unvaccinated COVID patients

news outletPBS News Hour
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

For a front-line perspective, I'm joined by Dr. Ivor Douglas. He's chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Denver Health and a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas, welcome to the "NewsHour." Thank you for making the time. Take us, if you can, inside your hospital right now. What does it look like? What do you see?"

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HuffPost

Everything You Should Ask Or Be Told When You’ve Been Exposed To COVID At Work

news outletHuffPost
Publish DateNovember 21, 2021

Ideally, you would not even need to ask questions of your employer about protocols. “It should be stated up front: ‘Should we have a case, this is what we are going to do,’” said Michael Van Dyke, an industrial hygienist who studies workplace exposure assessments at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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