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MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


Reuters

Blood Cell Damage May Explain Low Oxygen Levels; Two Vaccines Show Promise in Early Testing

news outletReuters
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

Damage done by the coronavirus to the membranes of red blood cells that carry oxygen may explain why many COVID-19 patients have alarmingly low oxygen levels, according to new research. Specifically, the virus attacks the membranes' most abundant protein, called band 3, said senior researcher Angelo D'Alessandro of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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National Public Radio

A User's Guide To Masks: What's Best At Protecting Others (And Yourself)

news outletNational Public Radio
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

A good option: a mask made of two layers of a thick-weave fabric with a built-in pocket where you can place a filter, says May Chu, an epidemiologist at the Colorado School of Public Health who co-authored a paper published on June 2 in Nano Letters on the filtration efficiency of household mask materials. ... "If you go to Walmart, you look for Oly-fun, which is the brand name of that fabric. It's also called spunbond," says Chu, who's a scientific adviser to the World Health Organization and helped craft its recent detailed guidance on cloth masks.

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The New York Times

Why a Pediatric Group Is Pushing to Reopen Schools This Fall

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

Dr. Sean O’Leary, a pediatrics infectious disease specialist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, helped write the academy’s guidelines. He is a father of two children, 12 and 16, and a survivor of Covid-19 who is still experiencing some symptoms after he and his wife contracted the coronavirus in March.

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Associated Press

Opioid Crisis in Colorado Could Get Worse Amid Pandemic

news outletAssociated Press
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

It’s always been easier for people in a behavioral health crisis to get access to alcohol and drugs than to a therapist, said Tanya Sorrell, a psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner and associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

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KMGH Channel 7

Study: Girl Lacrosse Players Twice as Likely to Suffer Concussions

news outletKMGH Channel 7
Publish DateJuly 01, 2020

“We really just set out to ask the question, "how much of the concussions of girls lacrosse could be directly attributed to the fact that they are prohibited from wearing the hard shell helmet with the full facemask that’s required in boys lacrosse?" said [Colorado School of Public Health professor Dawn] Comstock.

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The Denver Post

Second Lady Karen Pence Meets with Artsy Veterans in Aurora

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 26, 2020

Second lady Karen Pence stopped in Aurora on Thursday to meet military veterans and hear about an art therapy program at the Anschutz Medical Campus. Pence, a former art teacher and the wife of Vice President Mike Pence, heard from three veterans, their families and experts at the Marcus Institute for Brain Health, which cares for and researches traumatic brain injuries, primarily in veterans.

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The Colorado Sun

We’re Dealing With a Pandemic, But Remember the Opioid Crisis? Coronavirus is Likely to Make it Worse.

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateJune 26, 2020

It’s always been easier for people in a behavioral health crisis to get access to alcohol and drugs than to a therapist, said Tanya Sorrell, a psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner and associate professor at the University of Colorado College Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

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Colorado Public Radio

Medicaid, Schools, Pregnancy, Opioids: Here’s Where Colorado’s Cuts May Hurt

news outletColorado Public Radio
Publish DateJune 26, 2020

The state will suspend or cut funding for drug abuse prevention and treatment programs created by six recent laws, totaling about $26 million in reductions, according to Rob Valuck, director for the Center for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy. It could affect everything from public health campaigns to syringe exchange programs. “We know if there aren’t as many harm reduction services, people will invariably have to reuse equipment, they’ll be reusing needles, at increased risk of spreading disease like HIV and hepatitis C,” Valuck said.

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