<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News

By Media Outlet

The Denver Post


The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations rise slightly for a second week, but other measures are stable

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateOctober 06, 2022

As of Wednesday, wastewater from eight utilities showed increasing amounts of the virus; 19 showed decreases; and 27 had essentially stable virus levels. For the state as a whole, wastewater concentrations are trending down, said Bailey Fosdick, an associate professor of biostatistics and informatics at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado COVID hospitalizations rise slightly, but experts aren’t worried yet

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 29, 2022

The number of new cases also ticked up a bit compared to the previous week, though the percentage of tests coming back positive remained unchanged. But the numbers are still within the general area where they’ve been fluctuating in recent weeks, said Bailey Fosdick, an associate professor of biostatistics and informatics at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations fall, but wastewater suggests more spread around Denver

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 22, 2022

It’s not clear why hospitalizations stopped dropping for a few weeks while cases and the percentage of tests coming back positive kept falling, said Talia Quandelacy, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health. Hopefully, they’ll keep falling, though rising concentrations of the virus in wastewater are something to watch, she said.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations tick up this week, but are expected to fall again

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 07, 2022

It’s possible that the downward trajectory has paused because kids returned to school and adults went back to their offices, meaning the virus has more chances to spread, said Beth Carlton, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the Colorado School of Public Health and a member of the state’s modeling team.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Should Coloradans worry about polio? Depends whether they’re vaccinated

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

The four-shot sequence of polio vaccines is more than 99% effective at preventing paralysis and death from the virus, said Dr. Daniel Pastula, who studies infectious diseases affecting the nervous system at the University of Colorado Anschutz campus. That means people who are fully vaccinated don’t need to worry about polio, even when there’s an outbreak, he said.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado medical schools use live actors to teach future doctors, but the pandemic permanently changed some of the way they do it

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateSeptember 01, 2022

Cass is a standardized patient. Her job is to memorize scripts and act out a wide range of different scenarios to allow medical students to apply bedside manner skills they’ve learned in the classroom in a realistic medical setting. There are currently 81 standardized patients — or SPs, as they’re referred to — employed part-time at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, home to Colorado’s largest SP program.

Full Story
The Denver Post

U.S. experts foresee more COVID in coming weeks, but it’s not clear what that means for Colorado

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMarch 24, 2022

It’s possible that the increased positivity rate in those mountain communities reflects that the state has scaled back testing, so that those who don’t feel sick are unlikely to go to the effort of finding a location, said Talia Quandelacy, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations still trending up as state surpasses 1 million cases

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJanuary 14, 2022

Data from South Africa and the United Kingdom suggests that people hospitalized with the omicron variant tend to have shorter stays than those hospitalized with delta, allowing beds to turn over more quickly and somewhat reducing the strain on capacity, said Beth Carlton, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the Colorado School of Public Health. “The one encouraging bit of news is that we’re not seeing an exponential increase in hospital demand,” she said. Exponential growth is when numbers snowball, increasing by higher and higher rates.

Full Story