<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


Atlanta Journal Constitution

5 of the biggest issues nurses face today

news outletAtlanta Journal Constitution
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2019

And while burnout may seem like an issue mainly experienced nurses, today's nursing graduates are often unprepared for the toll that their everyday workload will take, Sara Horton-Deutsch, professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told WalletHub.

Full Story
Reuters

Heart failure makes surgery riskier, even without symptoms

news outletReuters
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2019

Even so, the results confirm that all heart failure patients need to be cautious about approaching elective surgery and make sure they manage their disease as much as possible before their operations, said Dr. Amrut Ambardekar, a cardiology researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, who wasn’t involved in the study. “Patients with heart failure can be treated to (stabilize) their symptoms; however, this balance can be easily tipped by the stress of a surgery,” Ambardekar said by email.

Full Story
WebMD

Poor sleep plagues many kids with autism

news outletWebMD
Publish DateFebruary 11, 2019

"It was very clear that kids with features of autism have more sleep issues," said Dr. Ann Reynolds, an associate professor of developmental pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. "For almost all categories, there was a difference between ASD kids and the general population."

Full Story
Health Day

Mammograms helped save 600,000 lives since 1989: Study

news outletHealth Day
Publish DateFebruary 11, 2019

The findings should help reassure women who wonder about the value of mammograms, said study author R. Edward Hendrick, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Recent studies "have focused media attention on some of the risks of mammography screening, such as call-backs for additional imaging and breast biopsies," he said. But those reports have also often neglected "the most important aspect of screening -- that finding and treating breast cancer early saves women's lives," Hendrick said.

Full Story
CPR

What’s more dangerous: skiing or hiking? In Colorado, that’s a tough question

news outletCPR
Publish DateFebruary 11, 2019

So, how should recreationalists evaluate the relative risks? While she was a graduate student at the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health, Lauren Pierpoint helped research high school sports injuries. Every time she is asked about risks, she tell people she “doesn’t have the answer.” For years, the research project thoroughly tracked injuries in practice and competition. They used athletic trainers as data reporters. Pierpoint said there’s nothing comparable for outdoor sports. “Most outdoor recreational sports that a Coloradan would be interested in almost all of them have no good data,” she said.

Full Story
Science

How scientists are fighting against gender bias in conference speaker lineups

news outletScience
Publish DateFebruary 11, 2019

One of the largest databases, “Request a Woman Scientist,” launched a year ago by the group 500 Women Scientists, contains the names of more than 8000 scientists from 133 countries. It’s open to anyone who self-identifies as a female scientist, says Elizabeth McCullagh, a postdoc at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora and a co-founder of the database. “If you feel like you fit into that mold—whether you’re an undergrad, a graduate student, a postdoc, a professor, an independent scientist, if you think you’re a high schooler who could actually be involved—everyone is welcome.”

Full Story
CBS4 Denver

Burn survivors teach nursing students about injuries, healing process

news outletCBS4 Denver
Publish DateFebruary 08, 2019

Burn survivors shared their stories with nursing students in an attempt to help them better treat patients with these types of injuries. The students welcomed the guest speakers at the University of Colorado College of Nursing.

Full Story
Voice of America

Study: Opioid prescriptions for pets surge, mirroring human crisis

news outletVoice of America
Publish DateFebruary 08, 2019

It's not clear if the increase in prescriptions in Pennsylvania might be due to an increased push to better manage pain for animals and pets, said Dr. Lee Newman, a researcher at the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora, or if it is due to the growing number of people with substance abuse problems trying to get medications from veterinarians, or both. "It's speculation on my part, but it could be that when a human patient stops getting opioid prescriptions from their doctor that they next turn to the veterinarian to try to get drugs," Newman, who wasn't involved in the study, said by email.

Full Story