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Nathan Gill


CU Anschutz researchers use electronic health data to predict which patients will use opioid medications long-term after hospitalization

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are working to develop statistical models to better predict which patients will be prescribed opioid medications long-term following discharge from a hospital stay. Opioids are commonly prescribed in the hospital but little is known about which patients will progress to chronic opioid therapy following discharge.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 02, 2018
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trial commencing for Elipse Balloon

Enrollment for ENLIGHTEN, a United States clinical trial for the Elipse® Balloon – the world’s first and only procedureless™ gastric balloon for weight loss, has started at University of Colorado Hospital at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date February 14, 2018
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Method to assess early intervention programs for America’s youngest is flawed

The US Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) should change the way it evaluates state early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with developmental delays, according to research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date January 18, 2018
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ACA Medicaid expansion resulted in fewer hospital closures, especially in rural areas

A new report published in the January issue of Health Affairs is the first to examine hospital closures in the context of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion. The study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus used data from 2008 to 2016, including multiple years of post-expansion hospital performance data.

The findings indicate the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was positively associated with improved hospital performance and a substantially lower likelihood of hospital closure especially in rural markets and counties where residents were largely uninsured adults prior to Medicaid expansion.

Richard Lindrooth, PhD, and coauthors in the Department of Health Systems, Management and Policy at the Colorado School of Public Health, examined national data on local market conditions, comparing the fiscal years immediately before the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (2008-12) with the years just after implementation (2015-16). The analysis was limited to nonfederal, short-term, general and critical access hospitals that had been in operation for at least one year between 2007 and 2015. According to the results, hospitals in the 32 states that expanded Medicaid were about six times less likely (or about 84 percent less likely) to close than hospitals in non-expansion states.

"Access to health care is a fundamental element of our health care system," explains Lindrooth. "Our results suggest that if future policies are adopted that both eliminate the Medicaid expansion and lower health insurance coverage rates, we will see an increase in hospital closures, especially in rural areas."

The authors note that the effects of closures on access and patient welfare depend on the degree to which local residents rely on the hospital for inpatient care.

Gregory Tung, MPH, PhD, co-author of the study at ColoradoSPH, says some closures could be less detrimental in certain areas, especially if hospitals are inefficient or of poorer quality. In urban areas, patients have more options, but it is a different story in rural communities.

"In rural and smaller communities, hospital closures have a far greater impact because they not only affect the delivery of health care services and emergency care, but we also have to consider that these hospitals may be the largest employer and often are pillars in those communities. A closure could mean the loss of well-paid, highly skilled jobs which often leads to well-paid skilled labor leaving those areas for larger cities and urban areas," Tung said.

The authors also add that virtually all closures will increase the travel time required for receiving care that can lead to worse outcomes for patients with conditions that need immediate attention.

"If patients do not have access to other hospitals, as is the case in many rural markets, access to health care will suffer--regardless of whether a person has health insurance or not," added Lindrooth.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date January 16, 2018
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Exposure study to assess people and water near Colorado Springs

Researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Colorado School of Mines received a two-year grant to investigate contamination of the drinking water in the communities of Fountain, Security and Widefield. Residents of these areas were exposed to drinking water contaminated with pollutants originating from aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) used in firefighting and training activities.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date December 21, 2017
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High-intensity exercise delays Parkinson's progression

High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson’s disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2, multi-site trial led by University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Northwestern Medicine scientists.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date December 12, 2017
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CU School of Medicine Physician Receives Top Honor

Michael Holers, MD, the Scoville Professor of Rheumatology in the University of Colorado School of Medicine, was honored with the designation of Master by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) during the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Diego. Recognition as a Master is one of the highest honors that the ACR bestows on its distinguished members.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date November 27, 2017
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Second University of Colorado vaccine approved by FDA for shingles

The Centers for Disease Control’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended new treatment practices Wednesday for shingles based on a vaccine initially developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, now the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date October 27, 2017
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TBI laws effective in reducing concussions among high school athletes

A new study using data collected in a national sports injury surveillance system by researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has found that state-level TBI laws are, in fact, beneficial in reducing the rates of new and recurrent concussions among U.S. high school athletes. Between 2009 and 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia enacted one or more traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws, more commonly known as concussion laws. These laws often include mandates to remove athletes from play following an actual or suspected concussion, a medical clearance before they can return to play, and annual education of coaches, parents, and athletes regarding concussion signs or symptoms.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date October 23, 2017
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Law enforcement, gun retailers resources for safe, temporary storage

Law enforcement agencies and gun retailers can be resources to concerned families for storing guns to prevent suicide, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. It is the first to examine the extent to which these organizations are willing to offer voluntary, temporary storage – especially when a household member is in crisis – according to surveys conducted in eight mountain west states.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date September 28, 2017
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New oral diabetes drug shows promise

A University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds sotagliflozin helps control glucose and reduces the need for insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date September 13, 2017
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Jankowski awarded NIH funding for bone density study

Approximately 46 percent (21 million) of older women in the United States have low bone mass, a condition that increases the risk of fracture, disability, and death, but may also be reversible. Exercise is recommended to maintain bone health in women, but the benefits of exercise may be limited by low levels of sex hormones after menopause.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date September 12, 2017
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Doping in sports: official tests fail to pick up majority of cases

Doping is remarkably widespread among elite athletes and remains largely unchecked despite the use of sophisticated biological testing methods. This is according to Rolf Ulrich of the University of Tübingen in Germany and Dawn Comstock of the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. They are lead authors of a study in Springer’s journal Sports Medicine.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date August 29, 2017
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Small cash incentives can encourage primary care visits

An economic experiment to inform policymakers considering Medicaid expansion shows small cash incentives to low-income people with new health care coverage can promote primary care visits that may significantly reduce costs overall. The study, by Cathy Bradley, professor of health systems management and policy at the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz, published today in the August issue of Health Affairs.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date August 07, 2017
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Spencer Milo joins Marcus Institute for Brain Health

milo Spencer Milo joins the Marcus Institute for Brain Health at CU Anschutz

Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date May 13, 2017
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Most remaining smokers in US have low socioeconomic status

After decades of declining US smoking rates overall, most remaining smokers have low income, no college education, no health insurance or a disability, according to research from the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 23, 2017
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Water fluoridation saves Americans over $6 billion in dental work

Americans enjoyed savings of $32 per capita in tooth decay prevention, according to a national assessment of fluoridation by Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) researchers published in Health Affairs.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date February 28, 2017
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Study finds an association between proximity to oil and gas development and childhood leukemia

Young Coloradans diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia are more likely to live in areas of high-density oil and gas development compared to young Coloradans diagnosed with other types of cancer, according to researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz. The researchers observed no association between non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and high-density oil and gas development.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date February 15, 2017
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Research investigates role of protein in obesity

Obesity in Latin America is increasingly concentrated among women of low socioeconomic status, but surprisingly little is known about what such women eat or how their diets compare to others.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date February 08, 2017
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Colorado medical students defend physicians’ right to recommend marijuana

In the first study of its kind, University of Colorado School of Medicine students expressed support for the legal use of marijuana, including for physical and mental health reasons. They also believe more research is needed to ascertain what risk could be involved in using the drug. These were some of the findings of a study led by Michael Chan, a recent graduate of the CU Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date January 17, 2017
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College of Nursing program ranked in top 10 by U.S. News & World Report

The CU College of Nursing was ranked among the top ten nationally in Best Online Nursing Programs, according to a report released today by US News & World Report.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date January 10, 2017
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C-P.A.W.W. to study veterans and shelter dogs walking together

The Canines Providing Assistance to Wounded Warriors team (C-P.A.W.W.), a small nonprofit veterans’ health research initiative based at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus, recently received funding to conduct an innovative study to evaluate how shelter dogs physically and psychologically impact veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date December 20, 2016
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In Colorado, self-harm is leading cause of death in new mothers

Self-harm was the leading cause of pregnancy-associated deaths in Colorado from 2004 to 2014, ahead of car crashes, medical conditions and homicide, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date December 08, 2016
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ColoradoSPH to address mental health disparities in cancer patients

The Colorado School of Public Health has been named a recipient of a  $1.9 million grant to address mental health disparities in low-income, uninsured and under-insured Coloradans who are suffering from lung, head and neck cancers. The grant is part of $152.8 million in grants that were recently allocated by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Board of Governors to support studies covering a range of conditions and problems that impose high burdens on patients, caregivers, and the healthcare system.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date December 05, 2016
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Long-term oxygen treatment does not benefit some COPD patients

Newly published data from the Long-Term Oxygen Treatment Trial (LOTT) show that oxygen use is not beneficial for most people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and moderately low levels of blood oxygen. It neither boosted their survival nor reduced hospital admissions for study participants.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date November 23, 2016
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Guatemala partnership aids farm worker health

lee-newman Lee Newman, MD, director of the Center for Work, Health and Environment and professor at the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz.

Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date November 17, 2016
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Center for Global Health receives Gates Foundation grant for groundbreaking research

CU Anschutz announced today that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Kathryn Colborn, PhD, assistant research professor at the CU School of Medicine and senior investigator with the Center for Global Health at the Colorado School of Public Health, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project titled “Development of an automated early warning system for malaria transmission using machine learning.”


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date November 15, 2016
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CU Anschutz joins six-state collaboration to create Veterans’ Action Leagues

A pioneering community engagement project for veterans is set to begin this month, kick-starting an innovative campaign to include the input of veterans, researchers and community members in the evolving dialogue around ways to improve veteran health care.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date November 10, 2016
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CU Anschutz, CSU study environmental impacts on children

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Colorado State University have been awarded $1.2 million to participate in a National Institutes of Health initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO).


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date September 22, 2016
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Rocky Mountain Center for Total Worker Health established

Colorado School of Public Health receives worker health grant Colorado School of Public Health has received a federal occupational safety grant to become a Center of Excellence to study Total Worker Health.

Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date September 15, 2016
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New blood spot test used internationally in fight against HIV

Pete Anderson, Pharmacy Pete Anderson, Pharm.D., Skaggs School of Pharmacy

Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date August 23, 2016
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Tanning salons seek relationships with young clientele through online ads

Indoor tanning is known to cause skin cancer yet indoor tanning businesses actively promote this dangerous behavior on social media, offering discounts and employing relationship marketing tactics, finds a national study performed by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date August 11, 2016
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CU Anschutz Researcher Receives Alzheimer's Association Grant

Huntington Potter, CU School of MedicineThe Alzheimer’s Association, in partnership with a fundraising initiative led by philanthropist Michaela “Mikey” Hoag, announces a new $7 million investment in clinical trials that target brain inflammation as an innovative avenue for Alzheimer’s disease therapy. Among the four clinical trials included in the newly-funded research is one led by noted Alzheimer’s researcher Huntington Potter, Ph.D., of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date August 02, 2016
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Lipid testing underutilized in adults taking antipsychotic medications

Too few adults taking antipsychotic medications are being screened for abnormalities in lipids, which include cholesterol and triglycerides, new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus finds.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date May 24, 2016
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Orthopedics department becomes title sponsor of Colorado Storm Soccer

The Department of Orthopedics at the CU School of Medicine, in partnership with UCHealth, has become the title sponsor of the competitive Colorado Storm Soccer Association (CSSA). Colorado Storm is one of the oldest and largest soccer organizations in Colorado. Since its inception in 1967, Colorado Storm has coordinated soccer programs for girls and boys ages 3 through 18 within four regional clubs along the Front Range, processing more than 80,000 applications for both recreational and competitive programs.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date May 09, 2016
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Breast milk hormones found to impact bacteria in infants’ guts

A new University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds that hormones in breast milk may impact the development of healthy bacteria in infants’ guts, potentially protecting them from intestinal inflammation, obesity and other diseases later in life.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date May 04, 2016
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Dr. Holly Wyatt of CU Anschutz Writes Forward to New Book

Dr. Holly Wyatt of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has written the forward to a new book by JD Roth, producer of hit reality television programs including Extreme Weight Loss and The Biggest Loser.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date April 14, 2016
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Everyday Colorado online health survey tool launches statewide

trees

Students at the Colorado School of Public Health are launching an interactive, online community engagement tool April 4 during National Public Health Week called Everyday Colorado.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 31, 2016
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History of Falling Increases Crash Risk by 40 Percent

Older drivers with a history of falling are 40 percent more likely to be involved in crashes than their peers, according to a new study released by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Falls limit an older drivers’ ability to function behind the wheel and can make driving risky for themselves and others on the road. These findings are important since annually a record 12 million older adults will experience a fall.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 25, 2016
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Antibiotics before age 2 increase obesity risk

While early antibiotic use has been associated with a number of rare long-term health consequences, new research links antibiotics to one of the most important and growing public health problems worldwide — obesity. A study published online in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, found that administration of three or more courses of antibiotics before children reach an age of 2 years is associated with an increased risk of early childhood obesity.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 24, 2016
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Researchers study marijuana use in pregnant mothers

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are studying the detection of prenatal marijuana use in a legalized environment. The study of marijuana use in pregnancy is only possible in a few states.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 09, 2016
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Researcher examines chronic disease in workplace

The science of physical activity at work remains understudied despite widespread acceptance that it plays an important role in health. Now, researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have published a comprehensive review of ways to monitor physical activity and tools for occupational exposure scientists.


Author Nathan Gill | Publish Date March 01, 2016
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