<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Blogs

Department of Pediatrics News and Stories

Publications

Alumni    Publications

NEJM Perspective: Learning to Say Goodbye

James A. Feinstein, MD, MPH, associate professor of pediatrics, [University of Colorado School of Medicine] offers a heartfelt tribute to the late Steve Berman, MD, in a perspective essay published May 11 by The New England Journal of Medicine.


Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Simon, Cree Publish Review for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome-Related Conditions

Stacey L. Simon, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, Section of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine is first author of a review published in late March by The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health that presents prevalence rates, screening tools and treatment recommendations for polycystic ovary syndrome-related conditions. Jaime Moore, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, Section of Nutrition and senior author Melanie Cree, MD, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, Section of Endocrinology and director of the Multi-Disciplinary PCOS Clinic are among six colleagues from our campus who are contributors.


Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Rolfes Is First Author on Neonate-Specific Liver Transplantation Research

Priya S. Rolfes, MD, a fellow in pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition program, is corresponding author of an original article published April 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics that identifies neonate-specific prognostic variables for survival with native liver in neonatal acute liver failure. The findings may help early risk stratification to guide medical decision-making and consideration for liver transplantation. Co-authors from our Department of Pediatrics are Professor Shikha S. Sundaram, MD, MSCI, Distinguished Professor Ronald J. Sokol, MD and Visiting Associate Professor Sarah A. Taylor, MD.


Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Grover, Cookson Co-Author Nutrition Guideline for Infants with Hernia

Theresa Grover, MD, professor of pediatrics, [Section of Neonatology] and Michael Cookson, MD '18, MHS, fellow in neonatal-perinatal medicine in pediatrics, are co-authors of an article published April 16 by the Journal of Perinatology that offers a consensus evidence-based framework for meeting the nutritional challenges faced by infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date April 23, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Simon, Snell-Bergeon First Authors on Adolescent Sleep Study

Stacey L. Simon, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, [Section of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine] and Janet Snell-Bergeon, PhD, MPH, professor of pediatrics, [Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes] are shared first authors of an original article published April 8 by Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism that examines associations between sleep and cardiometabolic health in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). “Sleep may be an important and novel target for improving cardiometabolic health in individuals with T1D,” the authors write. Nine colleagues from our campus are co-authors, including Kristen Nadeau, MD, MS, professor [and vice chair for clinical and translational research] of pediatrics, and Irene E. Schauer, MD, PhD, clinical professor of medicine, who are shared senior authors.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date April 23, 2024
Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Davis Is First Author on Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Original Investigation

Shanlee M. Davis, MD, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, [Section of Endocrinology, University of Colorado School of Medicine], is corresponding author of an original investigation published March 29 by JAMA Network Open that considers the prevalence of an additional X or Y chromosome among men who served in the U.S. military. Davis and her co- authors conducted a cross-sectional study of 595,612 men in the VA’s Million Veteran Program, finding that 1 in 370 men had a sex chromosome aneuploidy, but only 14.2% were clinically diagnosed by the time they were 60 years old. Men with an extra X or Y chromosome have increased risk of delayed development, learning disabilities, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date April 08, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Turner Authors Neonatal Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy Study

Megan J. Turner, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, is corresponding author of an article published March 20 in the Journal of Perinatology that evaluates whether three specific urine biomarkers of acute kidney injury would predict abnormal brain MRI findings. Having earlier markers to correlate with clinically significant brain injury would help clinicians in communicating prognostic information to families. Nicholas Stence, MD, professor of radiology, and Ilana Neuberger, MD, assistant professor of radiology, are co-authors on the article.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date March 25, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Feinstein Co-Authors Study on Morbidity of Neurologically Impaired PICU Patients

James A. Feinstein, MD, MPH, (associate professor of pediatrics and clinical research director, Section of General Academic Pediatrics; principal investigator, Adult and Child Center for Outcomes Research and Delivery Science; pediatric director, Children's Hospital Colorado Epidermolysis Bullosa Program), is a co-author of an original investigation published March 15 in JAMA Network Open that explores recurrent intensive care episodes and mortality among children with severe neurologic impairment.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date March 18, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

The relationship between severe hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and moderate-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Erica M. Wymore, MD, MPH (associate professor of pediatrics, Section of Neonatology), is corresponding author of an article published March 2 by the Journal of Perinatology that studies the relationship between severe hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and moderate-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Seven colleagues from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, including John Kinsella, MD (professor of pediatrics, Section of Neonatology), are co-authors.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date March 11, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Cotter First Author on Bacterium Infection Quality Report

Jillian M. Cotter, MD, MSCS, assistant professor of pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, is a corresponding author of a quality report published February 14 by Pediatrics that describes a quality improvement project aimed at reducing hospital-onset C. difficile infections while also eliminating unnecessary tests. The project, conducted from 2018 to 2020, included developing a clinical care pathway for testing and treatment for C. difficile, a clinical decision support tool to restrict testing, and targeted prevention efforts. Dr. Cotter and her co-authors conclude that such strategies can be used to decrease C. difficile and improve overall test utilization. 


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date February 26, 2024
Full Story

Research    Press Coverage    Publications

Diagnosing Pediatric Sepsis Regardless of Practice Setting Resources

When the task force began its meta-analysis to find the new pediatric sepsis criteria, the team “wanted to understand the settings where this work was done,” explained Halden Scott, MD, MSCS, an associate professor of pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Colorado, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, in Aurora, and a task force member. “We looked at whether the countries were classified as lower income, lower middle income, upper middle income or high income following the World Bank classification system.”


Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Abman Co-Authors Transpyloric Feeding in Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Steven H. Abman, MD, professor of pediatrics in the Section of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, is a co-author of an article published January 13 in the Journal of Perinatology finding that transpyloric feeding is associated with adverse in-hospital outcomes in infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia affects 10,000 preterm infants annually in the United States and is the most common complication of preterm birth.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 22, 2024
Full Story

Research    Alumni    Publications

Feinstein Co-Authors Article on Drug-Drug Interaction Exposure

James A. Feinstein, MD, MPH/MSPH, associate professor of pediatrics in the Section of General Academic Pediatrics, is co-author of an article published January 4 in Pediatrics that considers drug-drug interaction exposure in pediatric outpatient settings. Using a database of Medicaid beneficiaries, the authors reviewed cases involving more than 780,000 children and found that 21.4% experienced major exposures, putting children at risk for negative health outcomes and adverse drug events.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 22, 2024
Full Story

Publications

Cafferty Co-Author of Viewpoint Calling for Formal Training in Pediatric Suicide Prevention

Rachel Cafferty, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, and Bruno Anthony, PhD, professor of psychiatry, are co-authors of a viewpoint article published December 28 by JAMA that calls for formal training in suicide prevention for frontline emergency clinicians and staff caring for children and adolescents. The commentary describes the growing public health problem of pediatric suicide, high risk patients and the front seat of the ED to this crisis and offers suggestions for clinical and policy-level solutions. They propose standardized screening practices and increased engagement with community partners and outpatient mental health services.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 10, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Ambroggio, Osborne Publish on Antimicrobial Resistance in the Lung Microbiome

Lilliam Ambroggio, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics, Christina M. Osborne, MD, instructor of pediatrics, and Brandie D. Wagner, PhD, associate professor of biostatistics and informatics in the Colorado School of Public Health, are co-authors of an article published January 2 in Nature Communications that adds information about antimicrobial resistance in the lung microbiome. The authors performed an observational study of children and adults with acute respiratory failure. Their findings of higher resistance in adults compared to children could have implications for clinical management and public health.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 10, 2024
Full Story

Research    Publications

Waldrop Comments on Inequities in Access to Weight Loss Medications

Stephanie W. Waldrop, MD, instructor of pediatrics, is corresponding author of a comment published January 3 by Nature Medicine that addresses inequities in access to medications for weight loss. Barriers to access for the medications known as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists include high list prices, variable insurance coverage, and bias in prescribing. Stephanie and her co-authors conclude: “Health is a social good, and thus society has an obligation to provide health services that address the needs of all. GLP-1 agonists are effective treatments for weight management, and although regulatory bodies and medical providers are on the right path, we have a long way to go.”


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 10, 2024
Full Story

Publications

Stille Investigates Pediatric Medical Subspecialist Use in Outpatient Settings

Christopher J. Stille, MD, MPH, professor of pediatrics, is co-author of an original investigation, “Pediatric Medical Subspecialist Use in Outpatient Settings,” published January 4 by JAMA Network Open. The study used electronic health records and health plan claims data to compare rates of subspecialist use, finding that 8.6% of Medicaid beneficiaries, 10.4% of those with commercial insurance, and 21.3% of those whose primary care is received in academic health systems use pediatric subspecialty care each year.


Author Department of Pediatrics | Publish Date January 04, 2024
Full Story

Department of Pediatrics In the News

Neurology Live

Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profile of Ocrelizumab in Pediatric MS Mirrors Adult Population

news outletNeurology Live
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

Led by Teri Schreiner, an associate professor of pediatrics-neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the observed PK/PD profile of ocrelizumab in this pediatric population was similar to that seen in adults. In addition, no new T1-gadolinium-enhancing lesions were reported at week 12.

Full Story
The Denver Post

Colorado to use $20 million from Juul vaping settlement to fund youth mental health services

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

“It’s pervasive,” said Robin Deterding, a pediatric pulmonologist and medical director of the Breathing Institute at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine]. “All teenagers know people who vape and use nicotine.”

Full Story
MedPage Today

BMI Affirmed as Good Screening Tool for Kids, Teens With Elevated Adiposity

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

With these new findings, “pediatricians can feel confident that identification of elevated BMI (≥95th percentile) continues to be an effective way to screen for increased adiposity,” Jaime Moore [assistant professor of pediatrics], and Stephen Daniels [professor and chair, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatrician-in-Chief], both of Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado in Aurora, wrote in a commentary accompanying the study.

Full Story
STAT

Study finds BMI, despite flaws, is useful estimate of body fat in children

news outletSTAT
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

Ihuoma Eneli, visiting professor of pediatrics [and head, Section of Nutrition] at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, called the study carefully done and much needed, given the controversies surrounding BMI as the core measure to define obesity. “We need to take criticisms seriously and see it as an opportunity to test and retest our assumptions, as this paper has done,” she told STAT via email.

Full Story