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CU Anschutz In The News


National Geographic

Inflamed Brains, Toe Rashes, Strokes: Why COVID-19's Weirdest Symptoms are Only Emerging Now

news outletNational Geographic
Publish DateMay 22, 2020

“Almost all the [neurological] things we’re seeing now with COVID-19 are things you might have predicted would have happened,” says Kenneth Tyler, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Associated Press

Colorado: Keep Virus Measures in Mind Over Holiday Weekend

news outletAssociated Press
Publish DateMay 22, 2020

The state has allowed 14 counties to adopt more liberal restrictions than state standards and is considering more requests, Ryan said. The Colorado School of Public Health estimates nearly 3% of the state’s population has had the virus, she added.

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Vox

Is the Customer Always Right if they Refuse to Wear a Mask?

news outletVox
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

Mike Van Dyke, an occupational health professor at the Colorado School of Public Health, told The Goods customers should be “respectful” by wearing masks and “maintaining distance as much as possible” while shopping. “It gets hard in terms of different places across the country,” he said. “Some places have required mask ordinances in place and some places don’t.”

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Los Angeles Times

Coronavirus Discoveries Can Come Along Faster with Adaptive Clinical Trials

news outletLos Angeles Times
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

Other researchers are eager to play that role. At USC, a team led by Dr. Heinz-Josef Lenz will be testing baricitinib and remdesivir in a clinical trial with 59 COVID0-19 patients, while another group at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus turned on a dime to design a clinical trial of baricitinib in 80 COVID-19 patients. “As a general principle, reproducibility in science is a central pillar,” said Dr. Joaquin Espinosa, who is leading the work in Colorado.

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The Denver Post

Colorado Doctors Using Donated Plasma to Treat Coronavirus Patients

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

Patients also have to be at least 18 and able to understand that the treatment is experimental, said Dr. David Beckham, an associate professor in the infectious diseases division on the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus. People who have had previous bad reactions to plasma therapies or who have a condition that make receiving more fluid dangerous, like a severe heart or kidney problem, might not qualify.

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Washington Post

Telemedicine Keeps Doctors and Patients Connected at a Safe Remove

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateMay 20, 2020

“If Medicaid continues to allow these visits, as we hope, after the emergency is over, many of my patients can access care without the need to travel or take time from work,” said Kyle Knierim, a family physician in Colorado and associate director of Practice Transformation in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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NBC News

Restaurants are Open Again in Texas — with Some Big Changes. Is it Safe to Eat Out?

news outletNBC News
Publish DateMay 15, 2020

“Eating out and interacting with society is not a risk-free scenario right now,” said Elizabeth Carlton, a professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. “If you’re in the older population or otherwise high-risk, you should still proceed with caution.”

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Today

What is Kawasaki Disease?

news outletToday
Publish DateMay 15, 2020

"Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent coronary artery aneurysms or dilation," Dr. Pei-Ni Jone, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora told TODAY, via email. "Please contact your primary care physician if your child presents with high fever, red eyes, red lips, big lymph nodes and rash so that early recognition of the diagnosis can happen. Early treatment will prevent coronary artery dilation."

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