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Department of Pediatrics In the News

Neurology Live

Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profile of Ocrelizumab in Pediatric MS Mirrors Adult Population

news outletNeurology Live
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

Led by Teri Schreiner, an associate professor of pediatrics-neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the observed PK/PD profile of ocrelizumab in this pediatric population was similar to that seen in adults. In addition, no new T1-gadolinium-enhancing lesions were reported at week 12.

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The Denver Post

Colorado to use $20 million from Juul vaping settlement to fund youth mental health services

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

“It’s pervasive,” said Robin Deterding, a pediatric pulmonologist and medical director of the Breathing Institute at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine]. “All teenagers know people who vape and use nicotine.”

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MedPage Today

BMI Affirmed as Good Screening Tool for Kids, Teens With Elevated Adiposity

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

With these new findings, “pediatricians can feel confident that identification of elevated BMI (≥95th percentile) continues to be an effective way to screen for increased adiposity,” Jaime Moore [assistant professor of pediatrics], and Stephen Daniels [professor and chair, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatrician-in-Chief], both of Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado in Aurora, wrote in a commentary accompanying the study.

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STAT

Study finds BMI, despite flaws, is useful estimate of body fat in children

news outletSTAT
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

Ihuoma Eneli, visiting professor of pediatrics [and head, Section of Nutrition] at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, called the study carefully done and much needed, given the controversies surrounding BMI as the core measure to define obesity. “We need to take criticisms seriously and see it as an opportunity to test and retest our assumptions, as this paper has done,” she told STAT via email.

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KUNC

A CU researcher finds a troubling link between youth diabetes and Alzheimer’s

news outletKUNC
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

New research at the University of Colorado could point the way to changing how, and when, doctors screen for Alzheimer’s. Allison Shapiro, assistant professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at CU’s Anschutz Medical Campus, led a study that looked for biomarkers that are typically found in older adults with Alzheimer’s, in young people with diabetes – specifically people in their teens and twenties.

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CBS News

Preventative drug providing hope for potential Type 1 diabetes patients in Colorado

news outletCBS News
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

"How this drug works is that it binds to the t-cell and causes it to go and get re-educated. Instead of being activated and wanting to kill the cells that make insulin, it basically becomes tired and isn't responsive to the beta cells," explained Dr. Kimber Simmons, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center within the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Healio

Tirzepatide lowers body weight, improves glycemic control for adults with type 1 diabetes

news outletHealio
Publish DateJune 06, 2024

“About 67% of people with type 1 diabetes have overweight or obesity. Thus, they have some insulin resistance, and they get all of the problems that you get with type 2 diabetes,” Satish K. Garg, professor of medicine and pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told Healio. “[Tirzepatide is prescribed to] help them lose weight.”

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Greeley Tribune

Born with half a heart, Frontier Academy Isaiah Broce has chosen to run — and defy all expectations set for him

news outletGreeley Tribune
Publish DateMay 29, 2024

Much of Isaiah’s ability to be this active was aided by an at-home telemedicine program called Heart Chargers, created by Children’s Hospital Colorado doctor [and associate professor, Section of Cardiology at University of Colorado] Roni Jacobsen.

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CNN

Prescriptions for weight loss, diabetes drugs for young people leaped 600% since 2020, study says

news outletCNN
Publish DateMay 29, 2024

Dr. Melanie Cree, a pediatric endocrinologist [and director of the Multi-Disciplinary PCOS clinic] at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and associate professor at University of Colorado School of Medicine] who has been working with this class of medication in clinical trials with children for almost a decade, says the drugs have been a game-changer not just to help kids lose weight and lower blood sugar, but also to lower liver fat and improve cardiac and kidney function – “all of those conditions that go with type 2 diabetes.”

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CBS News

VIDEO: How to Keep Your Kids with Asthma Safe During the Summer

news outletCBS News
Publish DateMay 26, 2024

Heather De Keyser, MD '10 (associate professor, Section of Pulmonary Medicine), gives tips on how to keep your kids with asthma safe this summer in this episode of Health Watch from CBS News Colorado.

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CBS News

Inflammatory bowel disease cases surging in children and adults; experts studying environmental triggers

news outletCBS News
Publish DateMay 24, 2024

Clayman's doctor, Dr. Edward Hoffenberg, [professor, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at University of Colorado and] co-director of the IBD Center at of Children's Hospital Colorado in Aurora... says IBD cases like Clayman's are higher In young children than ever before, something that he says is concerning.

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The New York Times

Is Fluoridated Drinking Water Safe for Pregnant Women?

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMay 22, 2024

“There is nothing about this study that alarms me or would make me recommend that pregnant women stop drinking tap water,” said Patricia Braun, MD '90, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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CNN

Moms with HIV can breastfeed if taking treatment and virus is undetectable, pediatricians’ group says

news outletCNN
Publish DateMay 20, 2024

“What’s new is that the AAP for the first time is explicitly saying that pregnant people with HIV who are on treatment and undetectable can be supported to breastfeed,” said Dr. Lisa Abuogi [associate professor, Section of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology], lead author of the report and a pediatrician in Colorado who works with people with HIV during their pregnancies.

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ABC News

US pediatricians group reverses decades-old ban on breastfeeding for those with HIV

news outletABC News
Publish DateMay 19, 2024

It recognizes that routinely prescribed drugs can reduce the risk of transmitting HIV via breast milk to less than 1%, said Lisa Abuogi, a pediatric HIV expert (and associate professor) at the University of Colorado and lead author of the report. “The medications are so good now and the benefits for mom and baby are so important that we are at a point where it is important to engage in shared decision-making,” Abuogi said.

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Gastroenterology Advisor

Edwin Liu, MD, Credits Mentors and Research Insights for His Patient Care Approach

news outletGastroenterology Advisor
Publish DateMay 17, 2024

In this physician profile, we spoke with Edwin Liu, MD, a [professor and] pediatric gastroenterologist and director of the Colorado Center for Celiac Disease at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr Liu also serves as Taplin Endowed Chair for Celiac Disease and is a founding member of the Society for the Study of Celiac Disease and board member for the International Society for the Study of Celiac Disease.

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Denver 7

Families, Children’s Hospital Colorado feeling impacts months after asthma medication is discontinued

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateMay 15, 2024

An asthma medication that thousands of people rely upon, including children, hasn’t been available in pharmacies across Colorado since the beginning of the year. Now, doctors at Children’s Hospital Colorado are beginning to see the impacts from its loss. “They discontinued Flovent,” said Monica Federico, the medical director of the Asthma Program at Children’s Colorado [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine].

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Medical Xpress

Study findings demonstrate benefit to pediatric celiac disease mass screening

news outletMedical Xpress
Publish DateMay 13, 2024

The dedication of our participants and the follow-up and completion of surveys, despite occurring during the pandemic, allowed for a very comprehensive study," said Marisa Stahl, MD, [assistant professor,] gastroenterologist at Children's Colorado and primary author of the study.

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Healio

VIDEO: Increasing HPV vaccination using ‘boot camp translation’

news outletHealio
Publish DateMay 13, 2024

“We have a handful of things we know work,” O’Leary said, “but there’s always room for more.” In the videos, O’Leary, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and chair of the AAP’s Committee on Infectious Diseases, explains how “boot camp translation” helped the researchers leverage the participation of clinical and nonclinical staff, parents and teens at six pediatric practices in three Colorado counties to increase their HPV vaccination rates.

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Healthline

Young People with Diabetes May Face Higher Alzheimer's Risk

news outletHealthline
Publish DateMay 10, 2024

“We are about to enter into a different world of healthcare because of the obesity epidemic in young people,” Allison Shapiro, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics and endocrinology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, said in a news release.

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The Colorado Sun

A 15-year-old hockey player with MS may never experience a symptom, thanks to Colorado research

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateMay 09, 2024

It was a school day afternoon when Blaise learned his diagnosis. He came to find out that his parents had received a call from the doctor that day. Soon after, the family had a telehealth appointment with Teri Schreiner, a pediatric neurologist who specializes in neuroimmunology [associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine] and the study’s lead pediatric researcher.

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CNN

‘Ozempic babies’: Reports of surprise pregnancies raise new questions about weight loss drugs

news outletCNN
Publish DateMay 08, 2024

GLP-1 agonists improve insulin resistance and lead to weight loss, so it makes sense that they also improve PCOS symptoms, added Melanie Cree, director of the multidisciplinary PCOS Clinic at Children’s Hospital Colorado. “It is completely being used now with no evidence because the [obstetrics] field knows that if you have 5% weight loss in these individuals with PCOS, you will improve fertility,” she said.

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PR Newswire

Children's Hospital Colorado Provides Guidance to Families for Navigating National Asthma Medication Changes

news outletPR Newswire
Publish DateMay 07, 2024

"We are now seeing the trickle-down effect of patients not being able to manage their asthma day-to-day," said Monica Federico, MD, pulmonologist at Children's Colorado [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine].

"We were given limited notice on the production changes and insurance coverage for these inhalers which so many children use," said Catherine Clark, PCNS-BC, nurse specialist at the Children's Colorado Health Pavilion [and instructor, Section of General Academic Pediatrics, CU School of Medicine].

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Pharmacy Times

Environmental and Social Conditions May Help Predict Severity of Asthma in Children

news outletPharmacy Times
Publish DateMay 05, 2024

“The neighborhoods right around our hospital definitely are disproportionately impacted by these social determinants. We see many children with more severe asthma coming from those neighborhoods. Children are not impacted equally across our city, and so it’s important to figure out what is driving that,” said Emily Skeen, pediatric pulmonologist with Children’s Hospital Colorado and fellow at University of Colorado School of Medicine, in a press release.

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CPR

Colorado changed its definition of child abuse and introduce ‘Plans of Safe Care.’ The impact isn’t clear

news outletCPR
Publish DateMay 02, 2024

“I think so often our birthing individuals with substance use disorders were often treated disrespectfully and noncentral to the care of their own infants after birth,” said Sunah Hwang, who founded CHoSEN and is a neonatologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine]. “I think what ‘eat, sleep, console’ and CHoSEN QIC [the group’s quality improvement collaborative] really did was change the paradigm in terms of what is the role of the birthing individual in that birth hospital care of the baby.”

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Westword

You're Not Imagining It: Climate Change Is Making Allergies Worse

news outletWestword
Publish DateApril 26, 2024

According to [Bill] Anderson, who's also a[n associate] professor of pediatric allergy and immunology at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, climate change has slowly extended allergy season over time. “What we're seeing is that because of these warmer temperatures, the allergy season is starting earlier each year and lasting a little bit longer,” he says.

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Teen Vogue

The Best Vitamins for Teens 2024, According to Pediatricians

news outletTeen Vogue
Publish DateApril 25, 2024

Providers recognize it can be easier said than done for teenagers to get all of the necessary nutrients they need through diet alone. Rochelle Cason-Wilkerson, MD, nutritionist, provides important information on how teens' needs change as they develop and how to incorporate vitamins into their diet.

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Fox 31 | Channel 2

Medical miracle: Denver child’s heart beats again after 14 hours

news outletFox 31 | Channel 2
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

Aline Maddux, associate professor of pediatrics [Section of Critical Care Medicine] in the pediatrics intensive care unit, is a part of Cartier’s medical team. “His heart stopped beating. We tried to revive it, and there was fear that he might not survive this,” Maddux said.

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Allergic Living

Asthma Medications Guide: What to Know for Optimal Control

news outletAllergic Living
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

“When determining if a patient needs a daily controller medication, such as inhaled corticosteroids, it is important to classify the severity of a patient’s asthma,” says William Anderson of Children’s Hospital Colorado….Anderson, an associate professor of pediatric allergy at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, says this helps in determining whether they need a daily controller therapy.

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Medscape

IV Ketamine Promising for Severe Refractory Headache in Children

news outletMedscape
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

In a retrospective chart review, IV ketamine led to in a 50% reduction in pain at discharge, with “nearly two-thirds” of patients having no recurrence within 30 days, lead investigator Scott Rosenthal, [instructor/fellow of pediatrics, Section of Neurology] from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, noted. Rosenthal reported the findings (Abstract S20.010) on April 15 at the American Academy of Neurology 2024 annual meeting.

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Pharmacy Practice News

A Global Approach to Pediatric Sepsis

news outletPharmacy Practice News
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

When the task force began its meta-analysis to find the new pediatric sepsis criteria, the team “wanted to understand the settings where this work was done,” explained Halden Scott, an associate professor of pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Colorado, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, in Aurora, and a task force member. “We looked at whether the countries were classified as lower income, lower middle income, upper middle income or high income following the World Bank classification system.”

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Healio

Exposure to air pollution not associated with allergic disease in early childhood

news outletHealio
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

Due to structural racism, Black and Latin populations have been exposed to more particulate air pollution, Stephanie Johannes, an allergy and immunology fellow at Children’s Hospital Colorado, said during her presentation.

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Becker's Hospital Review

Experts call for more data on weight loss meds as fertility drugs

news outletBecker's Hospital Review
Publish DateApril 23, 2024

“The ‘oops’ babies on Ozempic and Wegovy are happening all over the place,” Melanie Cree-Green, [associate professor of pediatrics, Section of Endocrinology and] director of the polycystic ovary syndrome clinic at Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora, told the news outlet. “It’s very exciting, but it's a bit scary because we’re moving forward without all the data.”

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The Conversation

Getting a good night’s rest is vital for neurodiverse children – pediatric sleep experts explain why

news outletThe Conversation
Publish DateApril 19, 2024

Three sleep experts – a neurology physician with expertise in pediatrics, a psychologist [Terry Katz, PhD, senior instructor, Section of Developmental Pediatrics] and a pediatric nurse practitioner – who are working together to help neurodiverse kids, including those on the autism spectrum, get better sleep.

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Becker's Hospital Review

180 chief medical officers to know | 2024

news outletBecker's Hospital Review
Publish DateApril 16, 2024

[Chief Medical Officers David Brumbaugh, MD, associate professor, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and Michael DiStefano, MD, associate professor, Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, CU School of Medicine] highlighted by this list champion patient safety, uphold rigorous quality standards, act as liaisons between leadership teams and medical staff, manage risk, and much more. These CMOs are drivers of continuous improvement, and their efforts have helped garner numerous quality and safety accolades for their respective organizations.

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Undark

Interview: Puncturing Misconceptions About Vaccine Hesitancy

news outletUndark
Publish DateApril 11, 2024

David M. Higgins, a pediatrician at the University of Colorado and Children’s Hospital Colorado, sees patients and also conducts research — but “not the type of research that’s done in the laboratory with beakers and things like that,” as he puts it. Rather, his focus is on health services research, including the study of vaccine delivery, public access to vaccines, and vaccine hesitancy.

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Healio

Pregnant women report increased COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy during omicron wave

news outletHealio
Publish DateApril 11, 2024

“As of July 29, 2023, Vaccine Safety Datalink surveillance found just 16.2% of pregnant people aged 18 to 49 years had received a COVID-19 booster vaccine, with only 8.3% of Black pregnant people and 9.6% of Latino pregnant people vaccinated during pregnancy,” Joshua T. B. Williams, assistant professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Ambulatory Care Services at Denver Health and Hospitals, and colleagues wrote.

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CBS News

Bill requiring Colorado insurers to cover weight loss drugs clears first hurdle despite analysis showing significant costs

news outletCBS News
Publish DateApril 11, 2024

Dr. Jaime Moore (assistant professor, Section of Nutrition, CU School of Medicine) with Children's Hospital Colorado disagreed.

"The heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure and dialysis, amputations, infections, these things that really represent significant cost savings especially if we intervene earlier. For adolescent girls who develop Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, PCOS is strongly linked to obesity and is the number one cause of infertility in the world. We would be preventing the cost of invitro fertilization."

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Medscape

Pediatric CNO Clinical Characteristics Can Predict Therapy Needs Over Time

news outletMedscape
Publish DateApril 03, 2024

“Since it’s common for there to be long delays before diagnosis of CNO, it is important to start an effective treatment promptly,” Katherine D. Nowicki, of Children’s Hospital Colorado, [and assistant professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine] Aurora, Colorado, told attendees. “While we have guidance on which treatments to use, it remains unclear which patients are most likely to respond to NSAIDs and which patients will require a second-line treatment.”

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Washington Post

The Checkup With Dr. Wen: Do you know a vaccine skeptic? Here are 10 simple responses.

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateApril 02, 2024

Caregivers want to make well-educated decisions when it comes to their kids, which can sometimes lead to concerns when it comes to vaccination. Sean O' Leary, MD, infectious disease specialist [and professor of pediatrics at University of Colorado School of Medicine], breaks down some ways you can respond to common vaccine concerns.

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Healio

Epicutaneous immunotherapy for peanut allergy found safe, tolerable through 5 years

news outletHealio
Publish DateMarch 29, 2024

These results indicate a favorable safety and tolerability profile with potential for use over multiple years of treatment, David M. Fleischer, associate professor of pediatrics [and head, Section of Allergy and Immunology at CU School of Medicine], Children’s Hospital Colorado, and colleagues wrote. “The only current options for peanut immunotherapy are oral immunotherapy and now omalizumab,” Fleischer told Healio.

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The Colorado Sun

How doctors in Denver helped pioneer research on a new drug for food allergies

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateMarch 29, 2024

“It’s almost impossible to avoid reactions and live in the real world,” said BJ Lanser, a pediatric allergy specialist at National Jewish Health in Denver [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine]. “That peace of mind and knowledge of the protection that is there is obviously of significant benefit to many.”

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The Denver Post

Colorado hospitals no longer required to report newborns who test positive for drugs, working to better support addicted moms

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMarch 29, 2024

Most providers working in birthing facilities don’t know that the law changed, though, and they may still report families based solely on a drug test, said Christine Gold, a pediatric hospitalist at University of Colorado Hospital [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine].

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Castle Rock News-Press

Castle Rock mom thankful after nearly losing son to rare heart condition

news outletCastle Rock News-Press
Publish DateMarch 27, 2024

“Heart block is an interruption in the flow of electricity through the heart,” said Dr. Dustin Nash, a cardiologist [and assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine]. “The upper chamber of the heart is usually in charge of how fast the heart beats. It looks like there was a blockage of that signal.”

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American Heart Association

Social and economic hardships in childhood may alter gut bacteria in Hispanic adults

news outletAmerican Heart Association
Publish DateMarch 25, 2024

“Just finding an association with gut bacteria composition does not mean it will have impacts on health,” said Noel Mueller, a visiting associate professor, [Section of Nutrition] in the department of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and department of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora. “The next step is to home in on these species and see whether or not they have links with cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases that have been linked to socioeconomic disadvantage.”

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Daily Herald (Chicago)

How to help your child get enough healthy, brain-boosting sleep

news outletDaily Herald (Chicago)
Publish DateMarch 25, 2024

Adequate sleep is a bedrock of a child’s physical and mental health, said Jill Kaar, an associate professor of pediatrics [and director of Research Outcomes in Children's Surgery] at the University of Colorado's Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado. “Everything starts with sleep,” said Kaar, a maternal and child health epidemiologist.

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Nature

Cutting-edge CAR-T cancer therapy is now made in India – at one-tenth the cost

news outletNature
Publish DateMarch 25, 2024

The product is also a reality check for researchers in high-income countries, says Terry Fry, an immunologist and paediatric oncologist [and director of the Gates Institute] at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Denver, who has advised the researchers involved in setting up ImmunoACT. “It lights a little fire under all of us to look at the cost of making CAR-T cells, even in places like the United States.”

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The New York Times

Measles Cases are Rising. Here’s What to Know About Symptoms.

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateMarch 25, 2024

“It’s a pretty miserable disease,” said Sean O’Leary, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases specialist [and director, Colorado Children's Outcomes Network] at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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Gastroenterology & Endoscopy

Total Wall Thickness Is Emerging as a Diagnostic for Pediatric EoE

news outletGastroenterology & Endoscopy
Publish DateMarch 19, 2024

Ultrasound already is showing evidence of the benefits of current treatment approaches for pediatric EoE, including dietary changes or swallowed topical corticosteroids such as budesonide or fluticasone, said Calies Menard-Katcher, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado, in Aurora, who was not involved in the study. “They showed that wall thickness decreased once kids went into remission,” she said. “This provides evidence for structural improvements with treatment in the pediatric population.”

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Arthritis Foundation

Unraveling Immune System Changes Before Rheumatoid Arthritis Onset

news outletArthritis Foundation
Publish DateMarch 15, 2024

With her rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Research Program award, Dr. Elena Hsieh (associate professor of pediatrics, Section of Allergy and Immunology) will focus on the immunological determinants that drive the conversion from “at risk” rheumatoid arthritis to symptomatic RA.

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Medscape

Systemic Viral Testing in Emergency Departments Has Limited Benefit for General Population

news outletMedscape
Publish DateMarch 15, 2024

Acute respiratory tract illnesses represent one of the most common reasons for being evaluated in an acute care setting, especially in pediatrics, and these visits have traditionally resulted in excessive antibiotic prescribing, despite the etiology of the infection mostly being viral,” said Suchitra Rao, associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and associate medical director of infection prevention and control at Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. 

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The Denver Post

CU studying use of patients’ own reprogrammed cells to attack cancer as alternative to more chemo

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMarch 15, 2024

A study at University of Colorado’s Gates Institute on the Anschutz Medical Campus is looking at CAR-T in adult patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow, whose first round of chemotherapy either failed or gave a disappointing response that suggests it won’t work for long, executive director Terry Fry, MD, said.

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Denver 7

2-year-old girl, whose family was once helped through Denver7 Gives, has successful heart transplant

news outletDenver 7
Publish DateMarch 14, 2024

Crystal has had ventricular septal defect, a hole in her heart, since birth. The diagnosis brought her family to Children's Colorado to await a lifesaving heart transplant. “It was so critical that we got a heart as soon as we could for her that was compatible for her body," said Melanie Everitt, MD, Director of Pediatric Heart Transplant (and professor of pediatrics, Section of Cardiology). A year later, Crystal received her heart and is now back home.

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Science Magazine

Should doctors screen all kids for type 1 diabetes?

news outletScience Magazine
Publish DateMarch 13, 2024

Millions worldwide live with type 1 diabetes, and for most the diagnosis came as a shock, following mysterious symptoms such as thirst and weight loss. But diabetes specialists have long known that certain blood tests can foretell the disease years earlier. That has left the field wrestling with a difficult question: Should healthy children get these blood tests, and would knowing about incipient diabetes help them?

One project, in Germany, screened tens of thousands of children and tracked those who tested positive. It found that among 118 who progressed to full-blown diabetes, the rate of DKA was just 2.5%.

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KDVR

Experts offer helpful tips on getting your infant to sleep

news outletKDVR
Publish DateMarch 12, 2024

Many experts agree the once popular “cry it out” method is not ideal for helping an infant get to sleep. “It’s generally not a method we use or recommend with families,” said Katherine Wesley, a pediatric sleep psychologist with Children’s Hospital Colorado [and assistant professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine]. Wesley recommends responding quickly to an infant’s cry until they are at least six months old.

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MedPage Today

Cardiometabolic Disorders Tend to Accompany a ‘Lazy Eye’

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateMarch 08, 2024

Pediatrician Stephen Daniels, of University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado, said that an amblyopia-cardiometabolic link would be “hard to explain from a mechanism standpoint.” He suggested that a “third factor (perhaps the intrauterine environment) influences both outcomes (amblyopia and cardiometabolic dysfunction), but this would be very speculative,” he told MedPage Today in an email.

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STAT News

RSV monoclonal Beyfortus was 90% effective at preventing hospitalizations in children this winter: CDC

news outletSTAT News
Publish DateMarch 07, 2024

“It’s basically really good news,” said Sean O’Leary, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado. “In some clinical trials we see some level of effectiveness … but then when it’s rolled out in the real world, for any number of potential reasons, things don’t work out as well as they had in the clinical trials.”

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KKTV

Genetic testing, diagnosis of rare disease helps provide answers to Colorado Springs family

news outletKKTV
Publish DateMarch 06, 2024

According to Dr. Aaina Kochhar (assistant professor of pediatrics, Section of Genetics and Metabolism, University of Colorado School of Medicine) with Children's Hospital Colorado, PPA2 does not have a cure, but once diagnosed, it is more easy to manage.

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CBS News

Measles can be deadly and is highly contagious — here's what to know about this preventable disease

news outletCBS News
Publish DateMarch 01, 2024

David Higgins, MD, MPH, MS (instructor/research fellow, Section of General Academic Pediatrics): I am a pediatrician and preventive medicine physician, and I have anxiously watched measles cases rise worldwide while vaccination rates have dropped since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic due to disruptions in vaccine access and the spread of vaccine misinformation.

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UCHealth

Diagnosing heart issues in children

news outletUCHealth
Publish DateFebruary 28, 2024

“Years ago, we thought these hearts were fragile and needed sheltering,” said Dr. Diana Tsen, a pediatric cardiologist with Children’s Hospital Colorado who cares for patients at UCHealth Pediatric Heart and Vascular Clinic in Steamboat Springs. “But now, we encourage those with congenital heart defects not to live in a bubble. We want them to lead normal lives, enjoy sports and grow into healthy adults.”

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Contemporary Pediatrics

Long-term safety of epicutaneous immunotherapy with DBV712 for peanut allergy

news outletContemporary Pediatrics
Publish DateFebruary 27, 2024

"The biggest takeaway from the long-term study of Viaskin for the treatment of peanut allergy is the continued data that show the high safety profile of the treatment, making it an attractive future treatment option for patients, families, and clinicians," David M. Fleischer, MD, director, Allergy and Immunology Center, Children's Hospital Colorado, and study author told Contemporary Pediatrics.

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Infectious Disease Special Edition

Diagnosing Pediatric Sepsis Regardless of Practice Setting Resources

news outletInfectious Disease Special Edition
Publish DateFebruary 23, 2024

When the task force began its meta-analysis to find the new pediatric sepsis criteria, the team “wanted to understand the settings where this work was done,” explained Halden Scott, MD, MSCS, an associate professor of pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Colorado, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, in Aurora, and a task force member. “We looked at whether the countries were classified as lower income, lower middle income, upper middle income or high income following the World Bank classification system.”

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Healio

Diagnostic stewardship helps reduce C. difficile at children’s hospital

news outletHealio
Publish DateFebruary 22, 2024

Diagnostic stewardship, along with targeted prevention efforts and a testing and treatment clinical care pathway, reduced hospital-onset cases of Clostridioides difficile by more than 50% in a children’s hospital, researchers reported. 

Source: Cotter JM, et al. Pediatrics. 2024;doi:10.1542/peds.2023-061981.

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Healio

Amoxicillin remains effective against ear infections, small study shows

news outletHealio
Publish DateFebruary 15, 2024

“Ear infections are by far the most common reason that children in the U.S. are prescribed antibiotics,” Holly M. Frost, senior director of the Center for Health Systems Research at Denver Health [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine], told Healio. “By the time a child is 5 years old, 80% of them will have had at least one ear infection, and a quarter of them will have had three or more.”

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Becker's Hospital Review

Big systems have a responsibility to reach rural patients, pediatric heart leader says

news outletBecker's Hospital Review
Publish DateFebruary 15, 2024

For Shelley Miyamoto, MD, there were two reasons to become a cardiologist: The mentors she encountered during residency who inspired her and the physiology of the heart.

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Conde Nast

A puzzling illness paralyzed US kids every other year—until it didn’t

news outletConde Nast
Publish DateFebruary 14, 2024

Kevin Messacar, a pediatric infectious diseases expert at Children’s Hospital Colorado and another co-author of the January 2022 commentary, agrees. "The decoupling of AFM and the potential of AFM returning with an EV-D68 spike, I don't think anyone can predict at this point," Messacar told Ars. Instead of trying to predict, he said, it's better to prepare.

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Highlands Ranch Herald

Centennial gymnast finds right support from Children’s Hospital Colorado doctor

news outletHighlands Ranch Herald
Publish DateFebruary 14, 2024

“She didn’t think she could get the help to ever feel better and get the care she needed,” said Talynn’s mom, Elise. “But Dr. Sweeney [assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine]  and her gymnastics clinic changed all of that.”

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Children's Hospital Colorado

Children's Hospital Colorado Accepted as One of Nine Core Sites Nationally in the Prestigious Pediatric Heart Network

news outletChildren's Hospital Colorado
Publish DateFebruary 14, 2024

Children’s Hospital Colorado is announcing its recent acceptance into the Pediatric Heart Network, a collective of leading hospitals working to improve outcomes and quality of life for children – and more recently adults – with heart disease. The hospital’s Heart Institute will become one of nine clinical research centers across North America selected to be a part of this national network.

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News Medical

New comprehensive report on pediatric long COVID symptoms published

news outletNews Medical
Publish DateFebruary 12, 2024

The first author of the study was Suchitra Rao, MD, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Colorado Children's Hospital. Their findings have so far uncovered a few clues to long COVID risk. For instance, about 45% of the children who developed long COVID experienced COVID-19 symptoms rather than symptomless infections (15%). Other factors include older age, more severe initial COVID-19 infection, the number of different organ systems initially affected, underlying medical conditions and higher weight.

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The New York Times

New Report Raises Concerns About Long Covid in Children

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateFebruary 07, 2024

The new review suggested that 10 to 20 percent of children in the United States who had Covid developed long Covid. However, Suchitra Rao, a pediatric infectious disease expert at Children’s Hospital Colorado [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine] and co-author on the paper, acknowledged that there are “lots of caveats” with the prevalence estimates used to arrive at that number.

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Becker's Hospital Review

22 cardiologists, cardiology leaders on the move in 2024

news outletBecker's Hospital Review
Publish DateFebruary 06, 2024

Nearly two dozen cardiology leaders across the nation are making career moves, including at Children's Colorado. Shelley Miyamoto, MD is now the Jack Cooper Millisor Chair of Pediatric Cardiology and co-director of the Heart Institute.

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Healio

Insurance-mandated barriers linked to negative clinical outcomes in IBD care

news outletHealio
Publish DateFebruary 01, 2024

“Over the past 10 to 15 years, the outcomes of IBD have changed a bit and with those have come some increasing costs of care,” Brad David Constant, assistant professor of pediatric gastroenterology at [CU School of Medicine and] Children’s Hospital Colorado, said at the Crohn’s & Colitis Congress. “These costs of care have been met by the payers and insurance companies to try and make sure that we are not having unnecessary costs in utilization of these medications.”

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NBC News

A city of 710,000 struggles to cope with 40,000 migrant arrivals

news outletNBC News
Publish DateJanuary 27, 2024

Steven Federico, a pediatrician and chief of government and community affairs at Denver Health [and associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine], said the hospital has reached out to state and federal agencies for help. “I think it’s been an unheeded call so far in terms of who’s going to be responsible for the health care of this population,” Federico told NBC News. “In the meantime, it falls on safety net hospitals like Denver Health.”

Another pediatrician getting ready to work the late shift in the emergency room, Kristi Rodrigues, [associate professor of pediatrics at CU School of Medicine] said she worries about what care migrants will be able to access once they leave the ER. The hospital is required to cover anyone who comes in for emergency care, regardless of their immigration status or ability to pay, but Rodrigues worries that patients won’t be able to have checkups or get medication for illnesses that are sometimes life-threatening.

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CPR

Colorado offering new sickle cell treatment that ‘radically’ changes living with disease

news outletCPR
Publish DateJanuary 26, 2024

“This is an exciting time for sickle cell … and this has radically changed our conversations that we have with patients,” said Chris McKinney, a hematologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora who specializes in caring for patients with the disease. “We’re very relieved to be able to have additional options for our patients who have struggled for a long, long time with very few good options for over 30 years.”

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Bangkok Post

Royal honours for medical innovators

news outletBangkok Post
Publish DateJanuary 25, 2024

Barry H. Rumack, MD, professor emeritus of emergency medicine and pediatrics, received the Prince Mahidol Award for 2023 in a ceremony in Bangkok, Thailand, last month. Each year, two Prince Mahidol Awards are given to individuals or institutes who have demonstrated outstanding and exemplary contributions to advancing the world's medical and public health services. Barry was recognized in the public health category for his work on an antidote to paracetamol toxicity, which results in liver failure, and for pioneering the use of Poisindex as a poison information database.

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Medical Xpress

Nurse home visits have a lasting impact for disadvantaged mothers and daughters, health data show

news outletMedical Xpress
Publish DateJanuary 19, 2024

Co-author Professor David Olds of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said, "The women in this study were facing profound adversities. The trial showed that the relatively small investment for these nurse visits can lead to big changes because the benefits are the most pronounced where the needs are the greatest."

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CPR

The teens who made Colorado No. 1 in underage vaping 5 years ago are now young adults, and they’re still using

news outletCPR
Publish DateJanuary 18, 2024

In a Children’s Hospital Colorado exam room, pediatric pulmonologist Heather De Keyser shows a clouded X-ray of the lung of a young adult damaged by vaping. “This is a patient with vaping-related lung injury,” she said, pointing to a computer screen.

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9News

Does it feel like everyone is getting sick? Flu, COVID and RSV are all circulating through Colorado

news outlet9News
Publish DateJanuary 16, 2024

Fresh off the holidays, and now in the heart of winter, respiratory viruses are making their seasonal rounds through Colorado. While we expect several more weeks of increased patient volume, we believe we're past the peak of the respiratory season, according to Kevin Carney, MD, Associate Chief Medical Officer.

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Healio

Time in range, other CGM metrics linked to diabetic retinopathy risk in type 1 diabetes

news outletHealio
Publish DateJanuary 12, 2024

“Our study confirms that time in range, as well as time in tight target range, is associated with incident diabetic retinopathy,” Viral N. Shah, MD, associate professor of medicine and pediatrics in the adult clinic of the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, told Healio. “We only evaluated diabetic retinopathy in our study, but I am confident to extrapolate this finding to other microvascular complications such as nephropathy risk as well.”

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Post Independent

Ezra Williams’ heart-stopping journey: from soccer pitch to surgical triumph

news outletPost Independent
Publish DateDecember 29, 2023

In June, life took an unexpected turn for The Masters University freshman Ezra. Cardiologists Dustin Nash, MD, and Johannes von Alvensleben, MD, placed the first leadless pacemaker to help treat Ezra's serious heart condition.

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The Colorado Sun

Black Coloradans suffer higher maternal and infant mortality rates. Three groups are working to change that.

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateDecember 27, 2023

To address the longstanding issue of inequitable infant and maternal care for families of color, Children's Colorado is providing simulation training about bias in the medical system for all providers, called the Black Health Initiative. Jeannie Dixon, health equity program manager at the Child Health Advocacy Institute, and Marcela Mendenhall, MD, emergency medicine physician, share more.

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9News

Lakewood family hopeful gene therapy treats ultra-rare disease

news outlet9News
Publish DateDecember 20, 2023

A Lakewood couple learned both of their kids have SPG50, an ultra-rare genetic disease that affects cognitive and motor function. Though navigating SPG50 is far from what the family had planned, they're doing everything they can to help their kids, including gene therapy. Sarah Guistolisi, MD, neurology resident, explains more on treating this type of rare disease.

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Healio

Epilepsy treatment still facing barriers of efficacy, access

news outletHealio
Publish DateDecember 15, 2023

“Epilepsy really is a collection of rare diseases,” Kelly G. Knupp, MD, MSCS, associate professor of pediatrics and neurology at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, said at the American Epilepsy Society annual meeting. 

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Los Angeles Times

Pregnant people can get a shot to protect babies from RSV, but some hit hurdles

news outletLos Angeles Times
Publish DateDecember 13, 2023

The shots have been hailed as a game changer for RSV, an illness that crowds pediatric wards in fall and winter and causes tens of thousands of young children in the U.S. to be hospitalized annually. 

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American Journal of Managed Care

Did the COVID-19 Pandemic Change Parental Vaccine Hesitancy in the United States?

news outletAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Publish DateDecember 12, 2023

A study found that the COVID-19 pandemic was not associated with changes in the proportion of parents who were hesitant toward childhood vaccines.

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The New York Times

New Drugs Can Fix Teenage Obesity, but Young People Don’t Get Them

news outletThe New York Times
Publish DateDecember 11, 2023

“How do we reconcile the message when we tell a child that weight doesn’t define them, that it’s just a number,” and then, in the next breath, suggest that the child take a weight loss medication? 

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9News

Denver Health struggling with drastic increase in ER visits

news outlet9News
Publish DateDecember 08, 2023

The hospital says most patients are suffering from respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV.

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KOAA

Consumer watchdog group and doctors warn about toy dangers this holiday season

news outletKOAA
Publish DateDecember 07, 2023

Water beads, button batteries, and high powered magnets are major concerns

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The Denver Post

Children’s Hospital Colorado needed 10 people to donate part of their livers to sick kids. More than 100 stepped forward.

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateNovember 21, 2023

Every child in need of liver transplant this year will get one as donors help clear waitlist

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9News

Mead teen back on the football field after hospitalization for flu complications

news outlet9News
Publish DateNovember 20, 2023

In December, the then-14-year-old developed complications from the flu and was rushed to the hospital, where he remained for 49 days.

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Romper

This TikTok Suggests Parents Attach The Nose Frida To A Breast Pump & No You Should Not

news outletRomper
Publish DateNovember 13, 2023

You should ignore any online tip telling you to use a product differently than how the product’s packaging directs you to, says Dr. Samantha Minneman, M.D., FAAP.

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MedPage Today

Benefits of Peanut Allergy Skin Patch for Toddlers Grow After First Year

news outletMedPage Today
Publish DateNovember 13, 2023

Peanut-allergic toddlers who stayed on an investigational, epicutaneous immunotherapy skin patch reached higher levels of peanut tolerance during the second year, according to the open-label extension of the EPITOPE trial.

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American Heart Association

Sudden cardiac deaths in college athletes fall, but still high in one sport

news outletAmerican Heart Association
Publish DateNovember 13, 2023

College sports have seen a decline in the rate of sudden cardiac deaths, but rates remain higher for Division I men's basketball players, as well as male and Black athletes in other sports, new research has found.

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CBS News

Why it’s so tough to reduce unnecessary medical care

news outletCBS News
Publish DateNovember 09, 2023

In Colorado, a new analysis shows that the number of tests and treatments conducted for which the risks and costs exceed the benefits has barely budged despite a decade-long attempt to tamp down on such care.

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Associated Press

US childhood vaccination exemptions reach their highest level ever

news outletAssociated Press
Publish DateNovember 09, 2023

“The bad news is that it’s gone down since the pandemic and still hasn’t rebounded,” said Sean O’Leary, a University of Colorado pediatric infectious diseases specialist. “The good news is that the vast majority of parents are still vaccinating their kids according to the recommended schedule.”

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Healio

COVID-19 pandemic not linked to changes in overall parental vaccine hesitancy

news outletHealio
Publish DateNovember 06, 2023

The COVID-19 pandemic was not associated with changes in parental vaccine hesitancy overall, but there were other effects, including a polarization of vaccine attitudes and changes in trust about vaccine information.

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KDVR

New infant RSV vaccine in short supply as respiratory illness season picks up

news outletKDVR
Publish DateOctober 31, 2023

Children’s Hospital Colorado is aligning their distribution of nirsevimab – a monoclonal antibody treatment for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – with the CDC guidance and recommendations for who to prioritize for receipt of this medication.

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NPR

Less snacking, more satisfaction: Some foods boost levels of an Ozempic-like hormone

news outletNPR
Publish DateOctober 30, 2023

But GLP-1's actions are extremely fast. "Once the hormone hits the blood, it begins to be degraded," says integrated physiologist Darleen Sandoval, at the University of Colorado, who has studied GLP-1 for more than a decade.

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Newsweek

The best hospital in each state, per Newsweek

news outletNewsweek
Publish DateOctober 25, 2023

Newsweek has released the top 600 U.S. hospitals ranked by state, sorted by a score that factors recommendations, patient experience, quality and patient-reported outcome measures.

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Vox

The RSV shot shortage isn’t just a supply problem

news outletVox
Publish DateOctober 25, 2023

On October 13, the drug manufacturer Sanofi made a surprising announcement: Public demand for Beyfortus — the brand name of nirsevimab, the company’s new product aimed at protecting newborns from severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections — had wildly outpaced supply.

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Steamboat Pilot & Today

Monday Medical: Diagnosing heart issues in children

news outletSteamboat Pilot & Today
Publish DateOctober 23, 2023

More adults are now living with congenital heart disease than ever before because of medical and technological advances that have allowed them to thrive decades beyond their initial childhood diagnosis.

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