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IVPC

Public Health    Announcements    Injury & Violence Prevention

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center Releases 2023 Impact Report

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center (IVPC) at the Colorado School of Public Health and Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, is pleased to announce the 2023 Impact Report. This report highlights the Center’s significant achievements, innovative research and evaluation efforts, and community outreach from 2023.


Author Noelle Musgrave | Publish Date June 04, 2024
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Press Coverage    Gun Violence Prevention

Coloradans’ injuries from guns have cost $8.4 million in health care in six-year span

Colorado has been trying to track numbers, treating firearm injuries and deaths as a public health emergency. As part of a concerted prevention push from the state, including a resource hub, that data can be found on a new online dashboard. The push comes from a partnership between the Office of Gun Violence Prevention within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Injury and Violence Prevention Center in the Colorado School of Public Health.


Author Colorado Public Radio | Publish Date May 10, 2024
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Student and Alumni    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Celebrating Students Committed to Injury and Violence Prevention

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center (IVPC) is excited to recognize the outstanding achievements of student award recipients for the 2023-2024 academic year. The IVPC Student Research Grant and the Hoffman Firearm Injury and Violence Prevention scholarship are key initiatives that demonstrate IVPC’s commitment to supporting education, collaborative research, and promoting injury and violence prevention efforts across disciplines.


Author Noelle Musgrave | Publish Date March 13, 2024
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Press Coverage   

State launches first-ever firearm data dashboard meant to help Coloradans better understand gun violence, prevention

Beyond mass shootings, which generate a lot of media and public attention, gun deaths have steadily increased in Colorado for more than a decade, according to the state health department and reflected on the dashboard. During that time, state leaders and community advocates have worked to fight the trend. Now they’re turning to a new avenue — a public health approach to gun violence prevention. 


Author Colorado Public Radio | Publish Date February 26, 2024
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Firearm Injury Prevention    Community and Practice    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

CDPHE Partners with the Colorado School of Public Health to Launch the State’s First Gun Violence Prevention Resource Bank

REMOTE (FEB 22):   The Office of Gun Violence Prevention within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has partnered with the Injury and Violence Prevention Center in the Colorado School of Public Health to publish the state’s first-ever resource bank regarding gun violence in Colorado.


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Research    Students    Epidemiology    Firearm Injury Prevention    Student and Alumni    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Mapping Mass Shootings in the United States

The United States has more than 10 times the number of mass shooting incidents than other developed countries, yet little research has shown the distribution and types of shootings, geographically.


Author Colleen Miracle | Publish Date July 26, 2023
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Students    Scholarship    Awards    Injury & Violence Prevention

Announcing Fall 2022 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grant Awardees

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center (IVPC) is pleased to announce the recipients of the Fall 2022 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants. The one-year grant awards, in the amount of $1,500 per project, were selected by a panel of center faculty from a large pool of applications submitted by students from various disciplines and schools.

The IVPC was fortunate enough to fund five projects this cycle. Below are the project titles and short bios on each student. Near the end of their one-year grant award, each student will report on their progress and findings in the center's Research2Practice webinar series

You can find past awardees and their projects on the IVPC website.


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Community    Epidemiology    Firearm Injury Prevention    Community and Practice    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

CDPHE Partners with the Colorado School of Public Health to Create Gun Violence Prevention Resource Bank

The Office of Gun Violence Prevention within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is partnering with researchers from the Injury and Violence Prevention Center in the Colorado School of Public Health to create and maintain a resource bank of regularly updated and accurate materials regarding gun violence in Colorado.


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Scholarship    Awards    Injury & Violence Prevention

Announcing New Student Research Grant Awards

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center is pleased to announce the recipients of the Spring 2022 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants. The one-year grant awards, in the amount of $1,500 per student, were selected by a panel of center faculty from applications submitted by students from various disciplines and schools in the Mountain West region.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

Injury & Violence Prevention Center to Host the SAVIR 2023 Annual Conference

The Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) is a professional organization that provides leadership and fosters excellence in the science of violence and injury prevention and care. SAVIR achieves its goals by hosting and promoting collective, educational and scholarly activities, including annual conferences. Every year, SAVIR opens an application call for organizations to host future conferences. Past conferences have been held in New Orleans, Louisiana, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Cincinnati, Ohio. The 2022 SAVIR conference will be hosted by George Washington University in Washington D.C, March 30-April 1, 2022.


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Students    Injury & Violence Prevention

Injury and Violence Prevention Spring 2022 Student Research Grant Application Now Open

Twice a year, the Injury and Violence Prevention Center awards up to 3 projects ($1500 per project) to support student projects in injury and violence prevention. The student stipend awards were created to attract and support students pursuing research and evaluation projects in the field of injury and violence prevention. Past awardees' projects included topics related to suicide, sports injuries, intimate partner violence, traffic laws and police violence, and child abuse. Other examples of projects include, but are not limited to work-related injuries, motor vehicle crashes, pedestrian injuries, fires and burns, falls, poisoning, drug overdose, etc. Visit our student projects page to see read about prior awardees and their projects.

"We are excited to continue supporting the next generation of injury and violence prevention researchers by offering these grants twice a year", stated Ashley Brooks-Russell, PhD, MPH, Director of the Injury & Violence Prevention Center. 


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Injury & Violence Prevention

One Year Later: Honoring the Victims of Anti-Asian Hate

Reverberations are still felt in Colorado’s Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community one year after eight people were killed in the Atlanta Metro Area – amongst whom were six Asian American women. On March 16, 2021, Daoyou Feng, Hyun Jung Grant, Elcias Hernandez-Ortiz, Suncha Kim, Paul Andre Michels, Soon Chung Park, Xiaojie Tan, Delaina Ashley Yaun, and Yong Ae Yue were killed. Since the start of the covid-19 pandemic, Asians and Asian Americans have experienced a sharp increase in discrimination and violence. In Colorado, 119 incidents were reported to the national Stop AAPI Hate reporting platform in 2020 and 2021 with the majority of incidents being verbal attacks.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

The Injury & Violence Prevention Center Releases its 2021 Annual Report

The Injury & Violence Prevention Center's 2021 Annual Report celebrates the accomplishments of the center and its members. The annual report features news articles, center highlights, research, webinars, and publications from 2021.


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Students    Injury & Violence Prevention

Announcing Fall 2021 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grant Recipients

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center is pleased to announce the recipients of the Fall 2021 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants. The one-year grant awards, in the amount of $1,500 per student, were selected by a panel of center faculty from a dozen applications submitted by students from various disciplines and schools.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

The City and County of Denver Officially Proclaims November 18, 2021 as Injury Prevention Day

In recognition of the important work being done to prevent injuries and violence, the mayor of Denver, Colorado has proclaimed November 18 as Injury Prevention Day in the city and county of Denver. The Injury and Violence Prevention Center based at CU Anschutz is joining forces with Injury Free Coalition for Kids, Columbia University Center for Injury Science and Prevention, and other leading injury and violence prevention organizations around the country to recognize National Injury Prevention Day. This annual event raises awareness about the burden of injuries, violence, and opportunities for change in our communities. Cities and organizations around the country will light up “green”, shining a light on and bringing awareness to injury prevention.


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Students    Injury & Violence Prevention

Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants Application Now Open

Injury and Violence Prevention Center Opens Call for Student Research Grants Applications

Twice a year, the Injury and Violence Prevention Center awards up to $2,000 per project (for up to 3 projects) to support student projects in injury and violence prevention. The student stipend awards were created to attract and support students pursuing research and evaluation projects in the field of injury and violence prevention. Past selected projects included topics related to suicide, intimate partner violence, traffic laws and police violence, and child abuse. Other examples of projects include, but are not limited to work-related injuries, motor vehicle crashes, pedestrian injuries, fires and burns, falls, poisoning, drug overdose, sports and recreational injuries, etc. Visit the past news announcement to see examples of prior awardees and their projects.

"We are excited to offer this grant for a second time this year. We hope to stimulate more interest in injury and violence prevention and elevate future leaders in the field," stated Ashley Brooks-Russell, PhD, MPH, Director of the Injury & Violence Prevention Center. 


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Students    Scholarship    Awards    Firearm Injury Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Announcing 2021 Hoffman Firearm Injury and Violence Prevention Scholarship Awardees

Congratulations to DrPH candidates Ginny McCathy, MPH, MDiv and Leslie Barnard, MPH on being selected to receive a Colorado School of Public Health Hoffman Firearm Injury and Violence Prevention Scholarship! The Hoffman Scholarship is awarded to incoming or continuing students in a masters or doctoral program at the Colorado School of Public Health. Students were selected via a faculty panel in which they demonstrated high academic potential and aspiration to work on the prevention of firearm injury and death (including suicide) in federal, state, or local public health agencies. 






Ginny McCarthy, MPH, MDiv 
Ginny McCarthy is a first year DrPH student in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health. Prior to beginning doctoral studies, Ginny completed her Master of Public Health at Loyola University Chicago and her Master of Divinity from Boston College. During her time in Chicago, Ginny worked in student-facing administration at Loyola’s Health Sciences Campus while also working closely with the Public Health Sciences and Emergency Medicine departments on topics of community engagement with a specific focus on firearm injury and prevention and social enterprise. Ginny hopes through her doctoral studies to incorporate geospatial analysis and community-initiated firearm safety practices into her work of firearm injury and prevention.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

Injury Center Seeks Nominations for External Advisory Committee

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is seeking nominations for a new External Advisory Committee.  The committee will enhance the ability of the Center to achieve its aims in reducing injury and violence in Colorado, the Mountain West and around the nation and world. Committee members will support innovation and help to guide new strategic directions for the center.  


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Firearm Injury Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

CU Anschutz Establishes the Injury & Violence Prevention Center

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has established a new center, the Injury & Violence Prevention Center, which aims to drive evidence-based prevention of injuries and violence through research, training and education, and dissemination.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

The Injury & Violence Prevention Center and The Kempe Center Announce a New Partnership: Pathways To Prevention

The Injury & Violence Prevention Center and Kempe Center are pleased to announce a new partnership that aims to connect prevention workers with the latest science on protecting children.

The Pathways To Prevention program provides free monthly webinars designed for those working in public health organizations, social services, child welfare, and the non-profit sector. These virtual learning experiences feature researchers working on various topics in the primary prevention of child abuse and neglect, as well as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Through these sessions, people working in prevention can learn more about the latest scientific research to apply in their work, while also helping to inform researchers about on-the-ground issues and priorities. This partnership continues the work of the Child Maltreatment National Peer Learning Team that launched in 2017 with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 


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Press Coverage    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

More Mass Shootings Spark Outrage—but Don't Forget the Daily Deaths, Either

Emmy Betz, MD, MPH, deputy director of the Program for Injury Prevention Education & Research, and Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, of the Brown University School of Public Health, advocate for a public health approach to address gun violence, in an op-ed in The Hill.


Author The Hill | Publish Date May 28, 2021
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Students    Injury & Violence Prevention

Announcing 2021 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2021 Injury and Violence Prevention Student Research Grants. The one-year grant awards, in the amount of $1,500 per student, were selected by a panel of center faculty from a dozen applications submitted by students from various disciplines and schools.

Alin Yuriko Badillo Carrillo


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Community    Epidemiology    Firearm Injury Prevention    Community and Practice    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Data on Gun Violence Would Save Lives—Just Like It Has for Car Crashes

In 2010, total U.S. traffic deaths fell to their lowest level since the 1950s – due in part to more motorists buying into “buckling up and embracing safety innovations.” Motor vehicle death rates have remained roughly steady since that time despite more people driving

Over the same decades, however, firearm death rates have remained steady and now started to rise. Why? 

Let’s start by unpacking what led to the decrease in traffic deaths. Spoiler alert: It wasn’t a single “magic bullet.” Rather, it was a combination of approaches under the “three E’s of injury prevention” — education, engineering and enactment.

Education includes teaching the public about safe driving (basic driving rules; “don’t drink and drive”; the #justdrive campaign to end distracted driving), and about safe behaviors (like using appropriate car seats for kids). Remember the crash test dummies from the 1980s in television spots about using seat belts? Traffic safety campaigns also involve community or cultural change, like the “friends don’t let friends drive drunk” slogan that also began in the 1980s. 

Engineering means making a product or environment safer — and sometimes this approach can work well because it doesn’t rely on changing behavior (which we know can be hard). For traffic safety, engineering advances over the past decades have had a major impact on crash fatality rates. Car occupants are far more likely to survive a crash now thanks to innovations like air bags (invented in 1951), seat belts and crumple zones (the parts of the car designed to absorb impact and crumple in a crash). Newer technologies like automatic braking systems and blind spot detection may even reduce the likelihood of a crash even happening. 

Engineering of the environment outside cars also helped reduce deaths, through things like rumble strips, highway guard rails, traffic lights (introduced in 1930) and urban design to reduce motor vehicle – pedestrian collisions. Social engineering has included the development of alternative transportation options, like Uber and Lyft, that may reduce drunk driving

Enactment of laws was a third key component to reducing traffic deaths. In 1970, the Highway Safety Act established the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), a national organization responsible for reducing deaths, injuries and economic losses from motor vehicle crashes. NHTSA oversees large educational campaigns as well as vehicle safety testing, ratings and recalls. 

Federal and state laws set speed limits and policies around driver licensing and driving while impaired. A key component of enactment is enforcement — that is, how are laws actually implemented and enforced, such as through heightened patrolling for drunk driving during holiday periods.

So, what does all this mean for reducing firearm-related injuries and fatalities? 

Well, the first takeaway should be that there’s not a single “magic bullet” here, either. It’s going to take a combination of approaches, as well as the research to understand which ones work and why

We need educational efforts to reduce firearm injuries and deaths — things like campaigns about secure home firearm storage (to keep guns out of the hands of kids) and reducing firearm access in times of suicide risk, and violence interruption programs with trusted community messengers. Maybe “have a brave conversation” will become the new “friends don’t let friends drive drunk,” as we encourage friends and family to look out for those with suicide risk. And we need engineering approaches like biometric “smart guns” (which can only be fired by an authorized user) and storage devices like safes, quick-access lock boxes and trigger locks. 

Yes, we will also need enactment of policies if we want to significantly reduce firearm injuries and deaths in the United States. But we need thoughtful conversations about those policies — and then research to evaluate their effect on a range of outcomes — rather than knee-jerk reactions (either pro or con). Beyond the policies most often debated, we should also be thinking about policies to encourage secure home firearm storage, facilitate temporary firearm transfers in times of suicide risk, reduce liability for firearm outlets that offer temporary storage to prevent suicide, or even establish a NHTSA-like entity for firearm injury.

Enacting firearm-related legislation alone won’t solve the problem of firearm-related injuries and deaths — nor will education, nor will engineering. We need them all — and we need the research to inform them all. We need to engage varied voices in these discussions. We need to move away from vilifying the “other side” and instead embrace the fact that all of us want to keep our friends and loved ones safe from harm. 

We’ve been down this road before, with a comprehensive approach to traffic safety and reducing motor vehicle deaths. We can do it again, this time with firearm injury.   

Emmy Betz, MD, MPH, is a practicing emergency physician and researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where she directs the Firearm Injury Prevention Initiative. She also co-founded the Colorado Firearm Safety Coalition and gave a TEDx talk on firearm suicide prevention. This piece reflects her views, not those of her employers.

This article originally appeared in The Hill.


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Research    Mental Health    Epidemiology    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Suicide Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Psychiatric Diagnoses Are Associated With Selection of Lethal Means in Suicide Deaths

Suicides are the second leading cause of death among 15-44-year-olds and the tenth overall leading cause of death in the United States. Suicide prevention efforts include consideration of whether an at-risk individual has access to lethal means and whether an individual has any psychiatric disorder such as mood disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, or substance abuse disorders. A psychiatric disorder diagnosis is a known risk for factor for suicide. Previous studies that examined specific means of suicide focused on demographic factors such as gender, race, urban/rural designation, age, or health status, and whether those factors are associated with specific lethal means. A recent study from the Colorado School of Public Health examined whether the choice of means by which a person dies by suicide is associated with specific psychiatric diagnoses.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

PIPER Releases Eight-Year Report

This report documents the first eight years of the Program for Injury Prevention, Education, and Research (the PIPER program), at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Over the past eight years, under the direction of Dr. Carol Runyan, the program has grown and realized many accomplishments in injury prevention research, training and education, and translation to practice. We take this opportunity to reflect and celebrate these accomplishments. Earlier this year Dr. Ashley Brooks-Russell took on the role of Director, and this report reflects that transition.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

The Injury and Violence Prevention Center Releases Its 2020 Annual Report

This report documents the year 2020 for the Injury & Violence Prevention Center, formerly the Program for Injury Prevention, Education & Research (PIPER). We take this opportunity to reflect on and celebrate the accomplishments of our researchers, faculty members, practice partners, and leadership team.


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Research    Epidemiology    Firearm Injury Prevention    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Colorado Emergency Departments Take New Steps to Prevent Youth Suicide

A new study conducted in seven Front Range emergency departments demonstrated success in helping parents make their homes safer when a teen is distressed.


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Community    COVID-19    Mental Health    Epidemiology    Firearm Injury Prevention    Infectious disease    Community and Practice    ColoradoSPH at CU Anschutz    Suicide Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

COVID-19 and Suicide: An Uncertain Connection

I live and work in Colorado, a beautiful state that can look to an outsider like a year-round playground of sunshine and skiing. But my state has a big problem: suicide rates that are among the highest in the country. 


Author Emmy Betz | Publish Date April 22, 2020
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Firearm Injury Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

#ThisIsOurLane in Colorado, Too

As an emergency physician and a trauma surgeon, we are honored to work with our multi-disciplinary teams 24/7 to save limbs and lives after devastating injuries — including those from firearms.


Author Catherine Velopulos | Publish Date December 03, 2018
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Community    Firearm Injury Prevention    Community and Practice    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Isn’t Better Research into Gun Violence Something Everyone Can Get Behind?

The Dickey Amendment, named after former Arkansas Rep. Jay Dickey, created a de-facto ban on federal funding for gun research in the 1990s.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

Study Steers Toward Goal of Keeping Seniors in the Driver’s Seat

Pig, horse, sheep, lynx, tiger, lion, bear, sheep, snake, buffalo, cow, elephant, giraffe, hippopotamus, rhino, gazelle, and 11 other critters large and small.


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Research    Injury & Violence Prevention

Data from ColoradoSPH Finds Brain Injury Laws Reduce Concussions in High School Athletes

Between 2009 and 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia enacted one or more traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws, more commonly known as concussion laws. These laws often include mandates to remove athletes from play following an actual or suspected concussion, a medical clearance before they can return to play, and annual education of coaches, parents, and athletes regarding concussion signs or symptoms. Now a new study using data collected in a national sports injury surveillance system by researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, has found that state-level TBI laws are, in fact, beneficial in reducing the rates of new and recurrent concussions among U.S. high school athletes. 


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Firearm Injury Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Gun Training in US Fails to Include Suicide Prevention

The low percentage of owners who have received training in suicide prevention is notable because there is a strong association between gun access and suicide, Dr. Emmy Betz, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Core Faculty, Program for Injury Prevention, Education and Research (PIPER) Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora.


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Injury & Violence Prevention

Follow-Up Communication After Suicidal Attempt, Reduces Future Attempts

According to a recent study, 30 percent of future suicide attempts can be reduced by a simple follow-up phone call after a suicidal patient is discharged from a hospital.


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Firearm Injury Prevention    Gun Violence Prevention    Injury & Violence Prevention

Research Shows Most Americans Support Restriction on Where Firearms Can Be Carried

According to research from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, more than two-thirds of Americans surveyed support some restrictions on carrying firearms in public places.


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Colorado School of Public Health In the News

The Denver Post

“Hear/Say”, a groundbreaking art exhibition, explores the effects of high-concentration cannabis

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateJune 11, 2024

At the intersection of art, science, and health, BRDG Project Gallery at 3300 Tejon St. in Denver hosting “Hear/Say”, a groundbreaking art exhibition exploring the effects of high-concentration cannabis. Sponsored by the Colorado School of Public Health, the show is a science-based examination that encourages conversation and open-minded understanding of a controversial subject through the artistic lens of local and national artists. The public is invited to view the exhibition from June 14 through July 14, 2024 during regular BRDG Project gallery hours. 

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Cancer Network

Learning to “Aim High” Within Male-Dominated Fields in Public Health

news outletCancer Network
Publish DateJune 10, 2024

Within public health, the field of health economics is one that has historically been male-dominated. Forging a path to find your voice and learning to stand out as a woman can be difficult. During a Breaking Barriers: Women in Oncology discussion, Cathy Bradley, PhD, and Lindsay M. Sabik, PhD, both spoke about why they chose to work in this field and how they both have had to overcame challenges hold the positions they have today.

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Healthline

Man with First Human Case of H5N2 Bird Flu Variant Dies in Mexico

news outletHealthline
Publish DateJune 07, 2024

A 59-year-old man in Mexico who contracted a type of bird flu known as A(H5N2) died in April, the World Health Organization said June 5Trusted Source. This is the first laboratory-confirmed human case of infection with an A(H5N2) virus worldwide, and the first avian H5 virus reported in a person in Mexico, the WHO said. “These viruses, such as H5N1 and now H5N2, primarily circulate among birds, with occasional spillover into mammals, including humans, under the right circumstances,” said Daniel Pastula, MD, MHS, chief of neuro-infectious diseases and global neurology at the University of Colorado and Colorado School of Public Health.

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STAT News

Smoke exposure from California’s wildfires linked to 52,000 early deaths, study says

news outletSTAT News
Publish DateJune 07, 2024

When large swaths of the East Coast were shrouded in wildfire smoke last summer, scientists in California grimly joked that maybe, finally, power brokers in New York and Washington, D.C. would be spurred to act on the burning issue that has long plagued the West Coast. Despite wildfire seasons that regularly burn hundreds of thousands of acres in California alone each year, researchers know relatively little about the long-term effects of chronic wildfire smoke on the body, and funding to reduce the known harms of exposure is scarce.

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