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CU Anschutz In The News


The Atlantic

A Guide to Staying Safe as States Reopen

news outletThe Atlantic
Publish DateMay 07, 2020

That said, many (but not all) parts of the country have at least gotten out of an “acute emergency phase” for the time being, according to Elizabeth Carlton, a professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. She now sees “a shift towards trying to come up with strategies that allow people to resume some parts of their old lives that are the least risky … We need to find a way to slow the spread of the virus that also allows us to maintain our mental and financial health.”

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The Denver Post

Colorado’s Coronavirus Hospitalizations and Deaths Peaked in April, but Health Officials Warn “We Could Go Backwards”

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMay 07, 2020

“I am encouraged by the death data,” said Katie Colburn, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus who has been involved in modeling the coronavirus pandemic. “I think there’s a positive trend.”

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Mic

Why Does My Sneeze Smell Bad? An Expert Explains

news outletMic
Publish DateMay 07, 2020

Sneezing allows your nose or airway to get rid of an irritant, like smoke or dust, says Vijay Ramakrishnan, who is a professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Usually, it’s a sign of irritation, not infection. “The nose is basically the initial filter that separates your lungs and respiratory system from the environment,” he explains, trapping pollutants and irritants from the air.

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The New Yorker

The Medical Students Who Joined the Battle Against the Coronavirus

news outletThe New Yorker
Publish DateMay 06, 2020

Some students fear the consequences of starting work at the height of a pandemic. On April 14th, Erin Aldag, a member of the class of 2020 at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, wrote an op-ed for the blog of the Association of American Medical Colleges … I am worried about 10 years from now, when students from the class of 2020 are tired, burned out, and have post-traumatic stress from these early days of their careers,” she wrote.

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KMGH Channel 7

"Now is the Time to be Diligent": Nurse Urges Coloradans to Follow Safer-at-Home Guidelines

news outletKMGH Channel 7
Publish DateMay 06, 2020

Laura Rosenthal's message to Coloradans was clear: Please follow the safer-at-home guidelines as frontline workers continue to battle the virus. "COVID-19 is unlike anything I've seen in 20 years as an experienced nurse," said Rosenthal, a registered nurse at University of Colorado Hospital and a professor at the college's nursing school.

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Scientific American

What COVID-19 Antibody Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us

news outletScientific American
Publish DateMay 06, 2020

"We don’t know the natural [course] of the disease. All we can do is [say] that if you have a good [antibody] test, and you trust the result, and you’re positive, you did have exposure,” says May Chu, a clinical professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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NBC News

Republicans are Reopening. Why is Democratic Gov. Polis doing the Same in Colorado?

news outletNBC News
Publish DateMay 05, 2020

Dr. Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, told NBC News that the state runs "a risk of a second surge of the epidemic" no matter when restrictions are relaxed. "If we waited two weeks or four weeks, still most of us would be susceptible," he said. 

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The Denver Post

Data Shows Coronavirus Creates Higher Death Toll in Colorado than Seasonal Flu

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateMay 05, 2020

While it can be difficult to compare data directly, it’s clear the new virus is more contagious and more deadly than seasonal flu, said Glen Mays, chair of health systems, management and policy at the Colorado School of Public Health. … “That’s why we never talk about shutting down the economy” during flu season, he said. “No pharmaceutical prevention, plus being more infectious, plus a much higher death rate are why we had to pull out all the stops.”

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