<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
MEdia Clips

CU Anschutz In The News


The Colorado Sun

Uncertainty Fuels Coronavirus Scams, Misinformation Around Colorado

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateApril 15, 2020

“We can count the most visible tip of the iceberg in the case counts and presumably the deaths are pretty accurate,” said Jonathan Samet, dean and professor of the Colorado School of Public Health. “We know that those case counts are an undercount, and they clearly are going to miss most of the asymptomatic people.”

Full Story
Denverite

Fatal Drug Overdoses Involving Fentanyl Tripled in Denver Between 2018 and 2019

news outletDenverite
Publish DateApril 15, 2020

CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy professor Rob Valuck said fentanyl can be up to 100 times stronger than morphine. “If it’s used outside medical use, it’s just extremely potent,” said Valuck, who also directs the Colorado Consortium for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention. “It’s really troubling, obviously, because it doesn’t take much of it to kill (a person).”

Full Story
KMGH Channel 7

Colorado Public Health Officials Seeing Rise of COVID-19 Cases Slowing Due to Distancing Measures

news outletKMGH Channel 7
Publish DateApril 14, 2020

Elizabeth Carlton, an assistant professor at the Colorado School of Public Health and a researcher on the state’s modeling team, agreed that data suggests “things may be slowing down” and that public health officials were waiting to see whether those trends hold in coming days. She said there is strong evidence social distancing measures are having a positive effect.

Full Story
FOX News

Do Face Masks Really Reduce Coronavirus Spread? Experts Have Mixed Answers

news outletFOX News
Publish DateApril 14, 2020

"Putting a face mask on does not mean that you stop the other practices," said May Chu, a clinical professor in epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health on the Anschutz Medical Campus who was not involved in either new study. "It does not mean you get closer to people, it does not mean you don't have to wash your hands as often and you can touch your face. All of that still is in place, this is just an add-on."

Full Story
Today

Do Coronavirus Symptoms Include a 'Fizzing,' Tingling or Burning Sensation?

news outletToday
Publish DateApril 14, 2020

Other coronaviruses that affect humans can invade the central nervous system, so it makes sense COVID-19 may have neurologic manifestations, Dr. Kenneth Tyler, chair of neurology at University of Colorado School of Medicine, told Neurology Today, a publication of the American Academy of Neurology.

Full Story
Washington Post

What it’s Like to Suffer From the Coronavirus’s Weirdest Symptom

news outletWashington Post
Publish DateApril 14, 2020

Thomas Finger is a professor of cellular and structural biology specializing in taste at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Based on accounts he’s collected from around the world, “The very peculiar thing about the covid taste loss is that it may preferentially affect sweet,” he says, meaning for some people, that’s the first taste to go — but it remains unknown why tastes would not be impacted equally.

Full Story
The Colorado Sun

Coronavirus May Have Reached Colorado as Early as January, Weeks Before the State had the Ability to Test

news outletThe Colorado Sun
Publish DateApril 09, 2020

Dr. Jonathan Samet, dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, says his team of epidemiologists derived the January introduction date by projecting backwards from the first cases identified by the CDPHE. “What is really built into it is the transmission dynamics,” he said. “In other words, how long it takes for somebody to go from being infected to being symptomatic, symptomatic to detected.”

Full Story
Powder Magazine

Are Ski Areas Responsible for the Spread of COVID-19?

news outletPowder Magazine
Publish DateApril 09, 2020

“The actual sport itself is not the major risk factor, but primarily it’s the lodging and the restaurants and the other social spaces where people from different areas interact,” says Glen Mays, a professor and public health expert at the University of Colorado. “Ski towns funnel people from different areas into places of social interaction and that’s kind of the recipe for being a super-spreading location.”

Full Story