<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=799546403794687&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Blogs

Press Coverage COVID-19 Women's Health Vaccinations

Video: Why COVID-19 vaccines are safe and recommended for pregnant women

Research    Cancer    ovarian cancer

Innovative Ovarian Cancer Research Newly Supported by R37 MERIT Award

One of the most impactful advancements during the past decade in treating ovarian cancer is the use of PARP inhibitors (short for poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase). PARP inhibitors are a type of cancer drug that blocks the PARP enzyme from helping to repair DNA damage in cancer cells.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date September 13, 2021
Full Story

Research    Community   

Studies Explore Links Between Stress, Choline Deficiency, Preterm Births, and Mental Health Issues

In two recent articles published in Schizophrenia Bulletin, Sharon Hunter, PhD, an associate professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, and M. Camille Hoffman, MD, MSc, an associate professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, along with their research group, have uncovered a potential link between choline deficiency in Black pregnant women in the United States and increased risk of developmental and behavioral issues that can evolve into mental illness later in their children’s lives.


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date June 16, 2021
Full Story

Community    COVID-19   

CU School of Medicine Doctor Working to Get COVID-19 Supplies to India

After seeing the tragic COVID-19 crisis unfolding in India, Saketh Guntupalli, MD, associate professor of gynecologic oncology in the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, decided to do something about it.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 19, 2021
Full Story

Gynecologic Cancer    Vaccinations   

Three Things to Know About the HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, and CU Cancer Center member Lindsay Brubaker, MD, wants everyone to be aware of the relationship between cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually-transmitted disease that causes the vast majority of cervical cancers. The current HPV vaccine protects against seven predominant strains of the virus that cause cancer, as well as the two that cause genital warts.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date January 22, 2021
Full Story

Diabetes    Public Health    Women's Health   

Placental Function Can Illuminate Future Disease in Adults and Children

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered a direct association between placental function in pregnant women and future metabolic disorders in children and adults, a finding that could lead to earlier intervention and diagnosis of disease. 


Author David Kelly | Publish Date January 21, 2021
Full Story

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases   

Some Catholic OB/GYNs Face Moral Dilemmas in Issues of Family Planning

A study of Catholic obstetrician-gynecologists shows some face moral dilemmas when dealing with issues of family planning and abortion due to their religious faith, according researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. 


Author David Kelly | Publish Date October 16, 2020
Full Story

Research    Gynecologic Cancer   

CU Researchers Come Together to Better Understand Ovarian Cancer Tumors and Treatment Outcomes

After nearly four years of work, a group of researchers and clinicians from the University of Colorado (CU) published a paper this week in the Clinical Cancer Research that shares findings from research looking at how the composition of ovarian cancer tumors changes during chemotherapy and contributes to therapeutic response.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date September 15, 2020
Full Story

Research    Gynecologic Cancer   

American Cancer Society Releases Simplified Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines

Last month the American Cancer Society (ACS) released updated guidelines for cervical cancer screening. The most notable change in guidelines is the changes in the age to begin screening. Per the new guidelines, it is recommended that cervical cancer screening begin at age 25. Previously, the starting age for screening was 21.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date August 18, 2020
Full Story

Patient Care   

Start the Conversation About Fertility Preservation Before Beginning Cancer Treatment

As survival rates of many common cancers have improved it is no surprise that conversations around fertility preservation have also increased. These advances in treatments are letting patients think about their future beyond cancer, and if that future includes children.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date August 10, 2020
Full Story

Philanthropy    Gynecologic Cancer    Cancer   

Building Towards Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

In July 2019, Emily McClintock Addlesperger was on vacation in Maine with her husband, Jason, when she felt sick and was airlifted to Portland with internal bleeding. A tumor on her ovary had burst. It was Monday. On Saturday, she passed away. Emily was 44 years old.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date July 16, 2020
Full Story

Research    Press Releases   

Extra Choline May Help Pregnant Women Decrease Negative Effects of COVID-19 on Their Newborns

Pregnant women who take extra choline supplements may mitigate the negative impact that viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19, can have on their babies, according to a new study from researchers in the Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Choline is a vitamin B nutrient found in various foods and dietary supplements, and is critical to fetal brain development.


Author Julia Milzer | Publish Date June 01, 2020
Full Story

Research    Patient Care    Press Releases   

Few Consider Religious Affiliation of Their Hospital, Don’t Want Religious Restrictions on Healthcare

A small minority of Americans surveyed consider the religious affiliation of the hospitals that treat them, but a majority said they didn’t want religious doctrine dictating their healthcare choices, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.


Author David Kelly | Publish Date January 02, 2020
Full Story