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CU School of Medicine Graduation 2022

For the University of Colorado School of Medicine Class of 2022, the past two years have been filled with many twist and turns as normal life was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The challenges these students have faced to balance school, clinical training, and personal life have demanded much of them.

Education    Community    Students

CU School of Medicine Graduation 2022

For the University of Colorado School of Medicine Class of 2022, the past two years have been filled with many twist and turns as normal life was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The challenges these students have faced to balance school, clinical training, and personal life have demanded much of them.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date May 20, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

From the Sea to the Scalpel 

It was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, aboard a Navy ship bound for the Middle East, that Josh Abolarin’s journey to medical school began.  


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 20, 2022
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Research    Community    Clinical Trials

Growing Evidence Shows Increasing Overlaps Between Human and Companion Animal Cancer Research

Molly the golden retriever was a fan of cookies. Whenever there was a plate of them nearby, she kept her eye on it, waiting for her chance to sneak one or five. She was a fan of water, too, even after she had surgery to remove her left front leg following an osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, diagnosis in April 2017.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date May 19, 2022
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Research    Press Releases    Community

Physician Mistreatment Emerges as Crisis that Can Ripple Through U.S. Health Care

In a recent survey of more than 6,500 physicians from across the United States representing a broad spectrum of racial and ethnic diversity, nearly 30% of respondents reported experiencing discrimination and mistreatment from patients or patients’ family members or visitors.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date May 19, 2022
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Press Releases    Faculty   

Heide Ford Named Chair of Pharmacology at CU School of Medicine

Heide Ford, PhD, professor of pharmacology, has been named chair of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, effective June 15.


Author Mark Couch | Publish Date May 17, 2022
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Research    Press Releases

CU School of Medicine Research Defines the Role of HDAC6 in Regulating Heart Stiffness 

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered an enzyme that regulates heart stiffness, setting the stage for developing novel treatments for heart failure. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 16, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

A Winding Road of Experience Leads Lifelong Learner through Medical School

Dottie Stearns’ road to medical school curved across San Salvador Island in the Bahamas, where she learned through studying Cyclura rileyi iguanas that it’s possible to survive a mass extinction event by burrowing.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date May 16, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

Leaning Into the Ambiguity of Human Experience

During his summers as an undergraduate student, Zaid Al Bahrani worked as a counselor at Camp Kesem in Ohio, a weeklong overnight camp for children impacted by a parent’s cancer diagnosis.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date May 13, 2022
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Research    Community    Philanthropy

Pioneer in Cellular and Gene Therapy Saddles Up For New Frontier at CU Anschutz

Fueled by a major investment by the Gates Frontiers Fund, a newly announced Gates Institute on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus will stand ready to transform the frontier of regenerative medicine and cellular and gene therapies in the Rocky Mountain region.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date May 11, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Public Health

Expert: Alarming Increase in Tuberculosis Deaths Emerging in COVID’s Wake

Worldwide focus on the novel SARS-CoV-2 reversed momentum that was halting an age-old killer. Tuberculosis (TB) remains the world’s most-lethal infectious disease after COVID-19, and, according to an infectious disease expert at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, health experts had planned to end the TB epidemic by 2035.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date May 10, 2022
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Women's Health    Rheumatoid Arthritis   

What You Need to Know about Rheumatoid Arthritis

Well over 1.3 million Americans are living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network. The potentially debilitating disease turns the body’s immune system against itself, attacking tissues and joints. Left untreated, the disorder can lead to deformed joints and disability.


Author Laura Kelley | Publish Date May 09, 2022
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Community    Students

A Journey Into Holistic Health

It was a few years before Kiyomi Daoud started college at Harvard University that her grandmother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. As devastating as it was watching her grandmother’s struggle, Daoud found herself not only curious about the neurologic process her grandmother was going through, but also how her grandmother’s condition was affecting her grandfather, her parents, her sister, and herself.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 09, 2022
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Patient Care    Education    Community   

Medical Students Find a Higher Calling at DAWN

Since 2015, uninsured adults living in Aurora, Colorado, have had a reliable place to go for medical care: DAWN (Dedicated to Aurora’s Wellness and Needs, a multidisciplinary, free clinic staffed by students and faculty from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 06, 2022
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Research    Community    Support    Diabetes   

Physical Activity Coaching Shows Benefits for People with Type 2 Diabetes

For some people with type 2 diabetes, the E word can evoke dread: exercise.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date May 04, 2022
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Awareness    Neuroscience    CU Anschutz 360 Podcast

OCD Ruled Moksha Patel’s Life Until a Rare Surgical Procedure Changed Everything

Moksha Patel, MD, is a busy man. He recently finished a fellowship in the Division of Hospital Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine where he is now a senior instructor. He’s been appointed lead physician informaticist for the Institute for Healthcare Quality, Safety, and Efficiency at CU Anschutz and is working toward an MBA at CU Denver.


Author Kelsea Pieters | Publish Date May 02, 2022
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Community    Basic Research

RNA: Star of 2020 Promises Repeat Performances in Scientific Breakthroughs

A star took center stage at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus on April 26, where the award-winning “guest” was presented by some of its greatest fans to a roomful of many new admirers.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date May 02, 2022
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Research    CU Anschutz 360 Podcast    Obesity

How Nature Compels Us to Overeat

For more than 20 years, Richard Johnson, MD, has investigated the impact of sugar, especially fructose, on the human body and how we process it. He’s found that evolution has programmed us to overeat on the promise that we will lose weight during lean times. However, it’s no longer feast or famine – it’s just feast. 


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Patient Care    Clinical Trials    CU Medicine Today   

Treating Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

Brigette Douglass lives by the 10% rule: To avoid losing sight of the big picture of her life, she never lets anything consume more than 10% of her focus.

This approach has allowed a full embrace of family, career, and world travel adventures while also becoming one of the longest-participating patients in a clinical trial for metastatic uveal melanoma.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date April 27, 2022
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Research    Public Health    Health equity   

CU Anschutz Researchers Team Up to Bolster the Health of Americans With Disabilities

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus are joining efforts to improve the lives and healthcare of the 61 million Americans living with disabilities, a number expected to rise in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Author Laura Veith | Publish Date April 25, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Press Releases    COVID-19   

CU Study Reviews COVID-Related Hospital Visitation Limits and Family Stress

Efforts by hospitals to protect people from COVID-19 by restricting them from visiting family members in ICUs may have contributed to a significant increase in stress-related disorders, according to a study led by University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers.


Author Mark Couch | Publish Date April 25, 2022
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Education    Community    Students    Recognition

Students Honor Those Who Donated Their Bodies for Anatomy Education

Eunice Spackman was born on her family’s high plains homestead near Akron, Colorado. She rode a horse two miles to and from school each day, a path so familiar that the horse wouldn’t deviate from it even when she wanted to go visit a friend.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date April 22, 2022
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Research    Faculty    CU Medicine Today

Learning from RNA's Mistakes Along the Way

Sujatha Jagannathan, PhD, chases RNA for a living and the pursuit often takes her in directions she didn’t expect to go.


Author Mark Couch | Publish Date April 21, 2022
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Community    Faculty

The Rare Disease That Took Gilbert Gottfried’s Life  

Comedian Gilbert Gottfried, known for his brash standup act as well as providing the voice for the Aflac duck and the parrot Iago in Disney’s 1992 animated film “Aladdin,” died April 12 from complications of myotonic dystrophy type 2, an inherited muscular dystrophy that affects the muscles and other body systems. Gottfried was 67. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 21, 2022
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Patient Care    Lung Cancer    Prostate Cancer    Melanoma    Immunotherapy   

Acknowledging the Fears of Cancer by Giving Them a Face and a Name

To understand why Beau Gill built a mental cupboard for Jeff and Spike, first you must travel back with him to the small town of Catemaco in Mexico’s state of Veracruz.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date April 20, 2022
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Research    Community    Pediatrics

CU Faculty Members Contribute to WHO Guidance on Newborn Hearing Screening 

Newly released World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on maternal and newborn care include a variety of crucial areas to be addressed in the first six weeks after birth, including vaccinations, breastfeeding, and screening for postnatal maternal depression and anxiety.  


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 20, 2022
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Community    Sports Medicine    Orthopedics

Conference Brings Physicians to Colorado to Learn How to Treat Extreme Sports Athletes 

With session titles like “Commando and Military Injuries: Late Night Stories,” “Surfing in the Olympics,” and “Cave Diving: The Deadliest Extreme Sport on Earth, or Not?,” you can tell this isn’t your average medical conference. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 18, 2022
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Research    Faculty    CU Medicine Today

Reading a Book That Never Ends

Olivia Rissland, DPhil, compares RNA to photocopies of pages of books at a library.


Author Mark Couch | Publish Date April 18, 2022
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Community    Faculty    Diversity   

CU School of Medicine Assistant Professor Honored for Her Work on Behalf of Medically Underserved Communities. 

Josina Romero O’Connell’s dream of being a doctor began when she was 3 years old, watching as her grandfather died in a small community clinic in a rural area of New Mexico halfway between Taos and Santa Fe.  


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 15, 2022
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Research    CU Medicine Today

RNA Bioscience Initiative Transforms Campus

Six years ago, the University of Colorado School of Medicine made a major investment in an RNA research program that has resulted in a growing community of scientists working together to investigate the ways RNA is entangled with human health.


Author Mark Couch | Publish Date April 14, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Dermatology

Will Smith's Slap at the Oscars Awakens the World to Alopecia Areata

A joke about bald heads by comedian and presenter Chris Rock at the Oscars ceremony last month stung patients and providers of alopecia areata (AA) around the world. Actor Will Smith’s shocking slap to Rock’s face in response ignited public awareness of a disorder that steals the hair of nearly 7 million people in the United States, many of them children.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date April 12, 2022
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Patient Care    Community   

New Focus on Irritable Bowel Syndrome Leads to Comprehensive Treatment 

Though irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition that affects around 10% of the population, there is a lot that patients and physicians still don’t know about it. What is known is that it is more common in women and people younger than 60, and it is often associated with mental health conditions like anxiety and depression. And it can cause life-impacting symptoms if not treated properly.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 08, 2022
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Patient Care    Community    Awareness    Transplant Center

Living Organ Donation Journey Inspires Doctor to Normalize the Experience for Others

At first, she was reluctant to talk about it – a little sheepish, even. The obvious question was, “Why are you doing this?” And though she had answers, none of them were quick or easy.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date April 06, 2022
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Alumni

CU Anschutz’s First Astronaut Commands Next Space Station Mission

Watching the Columbia space shuttle launch in 1982, a young Kjell Lindgren set his sights on becoming an astronaut. His appetite grew until, in 2015, he found himself tending to one of the first plants grown off-Earth on the International Space Station (ISS). The taste of that first space adventure – and the red romaine lettuce – was beyond anything he’d dreamed.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date April 05, 2022
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COVID-19    Vaccine

Should I Get a Another COVID Booster? Six Common Questions Answered

Americans 50 and older who are four months post-booster shot received the green light last week for COVID booster No. 2. An unexpected age drop combined with a receding threat of infection have some people in the approved group asking questions before rolling up their sleeves for a fourth time.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date April 05, 2022
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Research    Press Releases   

Teens with Severe Obesity Forgo Weight Loss Surgery Due to Stigma, Lack of Information and Costs

Adolescents with severe obesity may not pursue metabolic bariatric surgery for weight loss due to lack of information, difficulties with access to care, and because of social stigma, according to a newly published study led by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date April 04, 2022
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Community   

National Cancer Institute Renews CU Cancer Center’s ‘Comprehensive’ Designation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has once again recognized the University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center as one of the best cancer centers in the country. On March 31, the NCI officially renewed the CU Cancer Center’s “comprehensive” designation with a strong rating, the best ever received at the CU Cancer Center. The award recognizes the center’s strengths in basic, translational, clinical, and population science research, as well as leadership and resources devoted to community outreach and engagement and cancer research, training, and education.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 31, 2022
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Research    Cancer    Metastasis    lungs

Study Shows Critical Protein May Play a Role in Origin of Mesothelioma

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and their international collaborators have discovered that a protein critical in the embryonic stages of life is reactivated in certain cases of mesothelioma, offering clues into the origin of this aggressive cancer.


Author Laura Kelley | Publish Date March 30, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

CU School of Medicine Remains in U.S. News Top 10 for Medical Schools 

The University of Colorado School of Medicine continues to rank among the top 10 medical schools in the country for primary care, according to numbers released today by U.S. News and World Report. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 29, 2022
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Research    COVID-19   

Can COVID-Causing Coronavirus Outwit Human Innate Immune Response?

As Americans cross their fingers, hoping the pandemic stays behind them, scientists across the country remain focused on the novel coronavirus, intent on combating its next move.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date March 28, 2022
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Research    Neuroscience    Autoimmune disease

CU Anschutz Scientists Spot Signs of Multiple Sclerosis Before Symptoms Start

Two things happen when Teri Schreiner, MD, MPH, diagnoses a 10-year-old with multiple sclerosis (MS): It breaks her heart and inspires her research.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date March 22, 2022
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Education    Community    Faculty    Vascular Surgery    Cardiothoracic Surgery

Nurturing a Passion for Medicine that Was Born in the Midst of War

Almost a decade into his medical career, amid the daily traumas of war, Mohammed Al-Musawi, MD, began to love his job.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date March 22, 2022
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Community   

For Trailblazing Doctor, History and Empowerment Go Hand in Hand

As a young girl in the 1940s, Helen Morris, MD, saw a world rocked by atrocities and on the brink of momentous change. Eighty years later, Morris, who was among a small group of women doctors in Colorado early in her career, sees history repeating itself.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date March 21, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

Match Day Ceremony Reveals Residency Locations for Graduating Students at CU School of Medicine  

After four often-grueling years of medical school, more than 150 fourth-year students from the University of Colorado School of Medicine took the next step in their medical journey Friday.  


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 18, 2022
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Research    Awareness    Pediatric Cancer    Brain and Spinal Cancer

Youngest Brain Tumor Patients Have Significantly Poorer Outcomes than Older Pediatric Patients

A University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center researcher has found, through extensive data analysis, that the youngest patients with brain tumors – those ages birth to 3 months – have about half the five-year survival rate as children ages 1 to 19.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date March 18, 2022
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Innovation    Press Releases    Health Sciences

Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, PhD, Named Chief of Artificial Medical Intelligence in Ophthalmology

Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, PhD, has been named chief of the new Division of Artificial Medical Intelligence in Ophthalmology at the University of Colorado (CU) School of Medicine. In her new role, Kalpathy-Cramer will translate novel artificial intelligence (AI) methods into effective patient care practices at the Sue Anschutz-Rodgers Eye Center.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date March 17, 2022
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COVID-19    Vaccinations

From Emerging Variants to Grandma’s Health, Experts Say COVID-19 Youth Vaccines Still Matter

As office buildings refill with employees, and grocery stores bustle with mask-less shoppers, a question remains during the biggest lull in the COVID-19 pandemic yet: What about the children?


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date March 17, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    COVID-19   

CU School of Medicine Faculty Members Help Draft COVID-19 Guidance for Cardiologists 

Two faculty members at the University of Colorado School of Medicine are key contributors to a set of COVID-19 guidance for cardiologists released today by the American College of Cardiology. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 16, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

CU School of Medicine Match Day 2022

Match Day, when medical students are matched with the residency program they will begin after graduation, is the culmination of four years of hard work and sacrifice.

It's a time-honored tradition that many medical students dream about. You receive a message, you open it, and suddenly it seems like everything in your life changes. For medical students who are about to graduate, Match Day is a career-defining moment.


Author School of Medicine | Publish Date March 16, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Trauma and Fractures

Are Trauma Patients Getting Too Much Oxygen? 

Adit Ginde, MD, already had a hunch that most hospitalized trauma patients were receiving too much oxygen, but when the U.S Department of Defense came to the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus looking for solutions to problems around battlefield oxygen, he saw the chance to put his theory to the test. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 16, 2022
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Patient Care    Education    Community    Public Health

Caregivers Play an Important Role in Supporting Adolescents as They Cultivate Nutrition and Healthy Habits

For many adolescents with access to a smartphone or tablet, the messages about appearance, image, and weight are almost inescapable. Frequently, they are intertwined with messages about nutrition.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date March 15, 2022
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Education    Community    Students

Lessons Learned on the Football Field Translate to Medical Studies and Residency

For anyone who’s never done two-a-days in the August heat or faced down an opposing defensive lineman, the parallels between a football field and a health care clinic might not seem immediately obvious.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date March 14, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    CU Anschutz 360 Podcast    Alzheimer's

Could Viruses, Olfactory ‘Railroad Track’ Unlock Alzheimer’s Puzzle?

More than one in nine Americans 65 and older are now battling Alzheimer’s disease, and the numbers are expected to greatly increase in the coming decades as our population ages.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date March 11, 2022
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COVID-19   

Six Things to Know About Omicron’s BA.2 Cousin

As the nation moves into the least-infectious period since the start of the pandemic, with Colorado’s governor last week ushering the healthy and fully vaccinated back into a mask-less and more normal life, some experts warn against moving too fast.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date March 11, 2022
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Education    Community    Awareness    Climate Science

Effects of Climate Change Envisioned in Science Fiction Draw Deeply from Reality

The very near future begins with a stark observation: “It was getting hotter.”


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date March 09, 2022
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Research    Community    Pediatrics

Reducing Subsequent Injuries After A Concussion 

As assistant professor of orthopedics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, David Howell, PhD, understands the relationship between concussions and subsequent injury in athletes — namely, that after suffering a concussion, athletes at all levels are more likely to sustain another injury within the next year. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 09, 2022
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Education    Community    Students   

CU Medical Student Stephanie Nwagwu Pursues Her Passion for Public Health 

Even during her toughest days of medical school, when long nights of studying turned into long days on her feet in the hospital, one thing kept Stephanie Nwagwu going: her passion to care for underserved communities. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 08, 2022
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Patient Care    Sports Medicine    Clinical Affairs   

Multidisciplinary Approach Makes CU Sports Medicine Program a Winner

CU Sports Medicine — a multidisciplinary program involving the School of Medicine’s departments of orthopedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics — serves a wide range of patients: from toddlers to seniors, elite athletes to weekend warriors. To help dispel some misconceptions about the field and highlight what sets CU’s program apart from the competition, we interviewed three experts to learn from the pros.


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date March 01, 2022
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Patient Care    Education    Clinical Affairs   

Institute for Healthcare Quality, Safety and Efficiency Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary

“Quality over quantity.” It’s a familiar piece of advice for everything from shopping habits to food choices. But the concept is especially important when it comes to health care. In fact, it’s what led a coalition of CU Anschutz Medical Campus entities — the School of Medicine, the College of Nursing, UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, and Children’s Hospital Colorado — to establish the Institute for Healthcare Quality, Safety and Efficiency in 2012. 


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date March 01, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Rheumatoid Arthritis

Can the Gut Be Triggering Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have pinpointed for the first time a bacterium that could trigger rheumatoid arthritis. Their look at the gut microbiome’s potential role in the autoimmune disorder could offer clues in defining what patients are most at risk for the disabling disease.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date March 01, 2022
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Research    COVID-19    Pediatrics

CU-Led National Youth COVID Study Could Speed Care for Sickest Children

When Blake Martin, MD, packs up his two tots for preschool and outings, he knows their chances of ending up in the hospital with COVID-19 are slim. Many parents breathed huge sighs of relief when the mysterious virus of 2020 turned its focus away from the country’s littlest citizens.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date February 25, 2022
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Research    Genetics

Solving the Puzzle of Rare Diseases Through Data and Teamwork

Melissa Haendel, PhD, has many goals as a prominent data scientist and the first-ever chief research informatics officer for the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. All research on the academic medical campus stands to benefit from her team, skilled in the emerging field of data science.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date February 25, 2022
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Community    Awareness    Cancer

6 Years After Bile Duct Cancer Diagnosis, Focus Shifts to Not Wasting Time

There were a lot of things Jim White thought he’d never do: stay in one place long enough to feel roots grow beneath his feet, meet the love of his life, have a child whose daily joy in discovering the world reignites White’s own joy.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date February 22, 2022
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Patient Care    Community   

Clinic Addresses Skin Care Needs for Underserved Populations 

For members of medically underserved populations, dermatology has been a challenging specialty to access due to a lack of expertise among providers in treating specific conditions, the costs of care, and the uneven location of dermatology clinics.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date February 18, 2022
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Research    Diabetes    Obesity   

CU Researchers Identify New Method for Stimulating Signaling to Improve Metabolic Health and Possibly Treat Obesity

Following up on a 2018 study that identified an epigenetic modifier known as histone deacetylase 11 (HDAC11) as a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and diabetes, researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published new research that finds HDAC11 regulates G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) called beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs).


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date February 11, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Community    COVID-19   

CU Clinic Helps Patients Recover From Post-COVID Symptoms 

For health care workers, one of the most troubling aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic is people who get and recover from the virus, only to have additional — often more severe — symptoms arise weeks or even months later. Known in medical journals by names like “post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC)” or “long-haul COVID,” the condition can have debilitating effects even among the previously young and healthy. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date February 11, 2022
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Community    Awareness    Trauma and Fractures    GITES

Bob Saget’s Death from Accidental Head Trauma Brings Awareness of Signs to Look for Following Head Injury

Comedian Bob Saget’s death on January 9 was a shock to fans who loved him as Danny Tanner on “Full House” or for his stand-up comedy, and to those who admired and respected him as a colleague.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date February 10, 2022
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Neuroscience    Pharmacy    Clinical Research   

What's Slowing Medical Cannabis Clinical Research?

Artin (Art) Shoukas, PhD, a Johns Hopkins University professor emeritus, would have never dreamed he’d be using marijuana every night in his retirement years. He melts the medicinal form – mostly cannabidiol (CBD) with just a touch of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – under his tongue before dinner.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date February 10, 2022
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Pediatrics   

Inaugural Chief Scientific Officer, Child Health Announced

Children’s Hospital Colorado (Children’s Colorado), the University of Colorado School of Medicine (CU School of Medicine) and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (CU Anschutz Campus) are announcing that Ronald J. Sokol, MD, will become the inaugural Chief Scientific Officer, Child Health, effective May 1, 2022. As an experienced research leader and expert in pediatric liver disease and transplantation, Dr. Sokol will help formalize a joint research enterprise across the CU Anschutz Campus to promote discovery and increase understanding of childhood diseases, while also advancing clinical care to improve health across the entire lifespan. 


Author Staff | Publish Date February 08, 2022
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Research    Community   

CU Cancer Center Research Highlights Objectives of Biden's Moonshot Initiative

On this World Cancer Day, the University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center looks back to earlier this week when President Biden reignited his Cancer Moonshot initiative, setting ambitious goals to “reduce the death rate from cancer by at least 50% over the next 25 years and improve the experience of people and their families living with and surviving cancer — and by doing this and more, end cancer as we know it today.” 


Author Shelly Lange | Publish Date February 04, 2022
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Patient Care    Awareness    Low Vision Rehabilitation

Driving Dreams Come True at Age 52

By the time Karre Wakefield’s friends and classmates turned 16 and got behind the wheel, she had accepted riding as only a passenger. Wakefield was born with hydrocephalus, or excess fluid in her brain, which damaged her optic nerve and rendered her ineligible for a driver’s license in the state of Colorado.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date February 04, 2022
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Community    COVID-19   

Omicron Parties, Home Tests, Variants, N95s: COVID Convo Covers it All

With signs of a retreating omicron surge, should people who escaped the pandemic’s most transmissible variant throw a party – with infected guests?


Author Staff | Publish Date February 03, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Plastic Surgery

New Cosmetic Cream Created at CU Leaves Skin 'Silky' Smooth

From Silly Putty to the microwave oven, there is a long history of consumer products “accidentally” discovered during the scientific discovery process. 


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date February 03, 2022
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Education    COVID-19    Basic Research

COVID-19 Pandemic Ushers in New Era of Global Collaboration

“The University is under quarantine now, and no one is allowed in or out without a pass,” wrote a student to his mother during the summer of 1918.1 Back then, school closures, bans on public gatherings and face masks were commonplace. The measures used today to stop the spread of COVID-19, which feel almost unprecedented, were the very same methods used to contain the 1918 influenza pandemic.


Author Guest Contributor | Publish Date February 01, 2022
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Patient Care    Diabetes   

Diabetic Alert Dog Brings Comfort (and Sleep) to Family

After hearing the phrase “dead in bed,” restful nights for Marc Bullion and his wife, Becki, disappeared. Their daughter, Lelia, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at age 8, and her low-blood sugar episodes were unusually frequent.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date January 31, 2022
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Research    Faculty    Oncology

Wells Messersmith, MD, Named CMO of Oncology Services at UCHealth

University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center leader Wells Messersmith, MD, has been named chief medical officer of oncology services at UCHealth. In this new role, Messersmith will oversee cancer care at all UCHealth locations with a focus on expanding advanced treatments and the clinical trials UCHealth offers in partnership with the CU Cancer Center.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date January 27, 2022
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Research    COVID-19    Cancer    Vaccine   

CU Anschutz Research: Innovation in the Face of COVID Crisis

Much has changed in the world since COVID-19 emerged and touched off a global health crisis. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and other academic research institutions have been at the heart of the response to the pandemic, aggregating data, making discoveries, running clinical trials and developing therapies.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date January 26, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Community    Surgical Oncology

Research Finds Patients and Providers Differ in Opinions About Immediate Access to Medical Records

While both patients and clinicians prioritize information transparency, a 21st Century Cures Act requirement for the immediate release of test and lab results is proving more controversial, according to recently published survey results of clinicians and patients.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date January 21, 2022
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Research    COVID-19   

Researchers Explore Vulnerabilities Within SARS-CoV-2 ‘Hotbeds’ of Replication

Beneath the SARS-CoV-2 membrane and its spikes lurks a squiggle of genetic material, or RNA, enveloped by a protein that acts like bubble wrap to protect the genetic material. This protein also acts as a “hotbed” for multiple interactions to control the infected cell.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date January 19, 2022
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Research    Patient Care    Awareness

Telemedicine Strengthens Glaucoma Diagnosis and Management

For more than a decade, Tom Poindexter managed his glaucoma with drops as routinely as brushing his teeth. Catching it early, he was diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma, the most common form, in his 50s.


Author Rachel Wittel | Publish Date January 14, 2022
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COVID-19    Vaccinations   

Eight Things You Should Know About Omicron

Omicron is hitting the nation hard, pushing delta out as it infects at a higher rate of speed than any SARS-CoV-2 variant so far. In past days, infection rates in some of Colorado’s mountain towns have topped the nation, even in areas with high vaccination rates.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date January 11, 2022
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Patient Care    Skin Cancer    Basic Research

Health Hat Trick? Hockey Fan’s Eye for Skin Cancer May Have Saved a Life

Hockey games announce goals with a hard-to-miss flashing red light. At a recent NHL game, a fan used the color for a more important purpose. She tapped on the plexiglass and showed an assistant equipment manager a message on her phone, including these red-lettered words: “cancerous,” “mole” and “doctor.”


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date January 10, 2022
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Research    Education    Students   

Medical Student Receives Grant to Help With Cannabis Study

Emma Lamping, a second-year student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has received a $5,000 “Emerging Scientist Award” from the Institute of Cannabis Research in Pueblo, Colorado, for her work on a research study comparing postoperative pain medication requirements and surgical outcomes after major abdominal surgery for the treatment of cancer between daily cannabis users and nonusers of cannabis.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date January 06, 2022
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Faculty

Can Climate Change Affect My Health?

Every day seems to bring news of another climate disaster.


Author Kiley Kudrna | Publish Date December 20, 2021
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Patient Care    Cancer

Harnessing the Healing Power of a Doctor-Patient Relationship

With the quiet comfort of a caring partner, Sue Krummrei reaches over and pats her husband’s leg as he breaks down on camera.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date November 23, 2021
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Lung Cancer    Addiction

Does Vaping as a Smoking Cessation Tool Outweigh its Risks to Youth?

After 15 years of unauthorized vaping products being marketed across the country, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Oct. 12 gave its first-ever e-cigarette approval – three devices made by the company Vuse.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date November 19, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Cardiothoracic Surgery   

Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at CU School of Medicine Celebrates a ‘Herstoric’ Moment

With two female cardiothoracic surgeons in its ranks, the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Colorado School of Medicine is ahead of the curve when it comes to gender representation in the field. By one recent estimate, just 8% of cardiothoracic surgeons in the country are female.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date November 17, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Plastic Surgery   

Gender Affirmation Surgery Helps Patient Feel Whole for the First Time in 71 Years

The victory lap came 50 years after high school, in a female restroom at Denver’s East High School.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date November 15, 2021
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COVID-19    Mental Health   

Dreaming of the ‘Ideal’ Holiday? Forget Perfect. Remember Gratitude.

The holiday season has always challenged mental health experts and their patients. Things like loneliness, depression and grief over lost loved ones don’t go away just because the ornaments and the mistletoe come out. In fact, they often get worse.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date November 12, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Sarcoma

“You Are Cancer-Free”

The cancer diagnosis came at a time when it seemed as though everything was happening – he was only 37 and soon to become president of the Denver City Council; his three children were ages 4, 6, and 9; he had just run the BOLDERBoulder 10K.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date November 03, 2021
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COVID-19    Vaccinations

As New Vaccine Rollout for Youth Launches, CU Anschutz Parent Experts Share Views

According to her dad, Mia McMurray hates needles. The 8-year-old dutifully gets her flu shot every year, but not without dread. So when his daughter jumped at the chance to take part in a clinical trial for the COVID-19 vaccine, Michael McMurray was surprised.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date November 02, 2021
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Patient Care    Education    Faculty   

CU Street Medicine Connects Students with Opportunities to Aid People Experiencing Homelessness

Patient care doesn’t always happen within four walls or in buildings with controlled climates and cupboards full of supplies. Sometimes it happens in a parking lot, on the sidewalk, by a trail – wherever a person with need happens to be.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date October 28, 2021
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Patient Care    Education    Faculty   

CU Street Medicine Connects Students with Opportunities to Aid People Experiencing Homelessness

Patient care doesn’t always happen within four walls or in buildings with controlled climates and cupboards full of supplies. Sometimes it happens in a parking lot, on the sidewalk, by a trail – wherever a person with need happens to be.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date October 28, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Campus Life    Education    Community   

State of the Campus 2021: ‘Future Is Brimming with Possibilities’

On Oct. 27, Chancellor Don Elliman delivered the 2021 State of the Campus Address virtually. He detailed the growth and forward momentum of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, while highlighting the possibilities and challenges ahead. 


Author Staff | Publish Date October 27, 2021
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COVID-19    Vaccinations

U.S. Opens Doors to COVID-19 Booster Shots for Millions of Americans

With the U.S. approval of another COVID-19 shot now expanded to Moderna and Johnson & Johnson recipients, the doors have opened for tens of millions of more Americans to boost their immunity against the coronavirus.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date October 26, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Press Releases   

Fluid Dynamics

The U.S. Department of Defense is funding a study by Arek Wiktor, MD, associate professor of GI, trauma, and endocrine surgery and interim medical director of the UCHealth Burn and Frostbite Center – Anschutz Medical Campus, to aid in treatment of military and civilian burn patients.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date October 19, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Geriatrics   

Leading in Prevention of Elder Abuse: CU Anschutz Boasts One of Only Two Teams in Nation

Elder abuse and neglect are major problems – they happen to one in 10 older adults in the United States – and often hide in plain sight.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date October 19, 2021
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Community    Blood Cancer

Colin Powell’s Death Highlights the Challenges Multiple Myeloma Patients Face With COVID-19

In a grim reminder of the toll COVID-19 can take even among those who are vaccinated against it, former Secretary of State Colin Powell died Monday of complications from the virus. His family said Powell, who was 84, was fully vaccinated against the disease.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date October 18, 2021
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COVID-19   

Who's Coming to Dinner? Sharpen the Pencils and Get Out the Calculator

For the nearly 190 million Americans vaccinated against last year’s holiday-crashing coronavirus, the 2021 season appears brighter. The chances of ringing in the New Year in a hospital bed because of earlier social merry-making are dramatically lower this year for people who took the shot.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date October 18, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Breast Cancer    Advocacy

Genetic Counseling Helps Young Woman Take Control After Testing Positive for BRCA2

The first time Caley Kurchinski had to think about a double mastectomy, she was only 16. Her mother had died at age 36 from breast cancer, when Caley was 6. When she became a teenager, Caley’s family physician began telling her she needed to get genetic testing.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date October 15, 2021
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Patient Care    Awareness    Breast Cancer    Surgical Oncology    Plastic Surgery

Young Mom’s Breast Cancer Journey Highlights Importance of Breast Cancer Screening in Younger Women

Kirsten Stewart was just putting on lotion, like she does every morning after her shower. That particular morning, though, she noticed something different: a lump that hadn’t been there before and that definitely wasn’t normal. She was only 30 years old.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date October 07, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Child & Adolescent    GITES

CU Surgeon Looking to Extend Bariatric Surgery Services to Adolescent Patients

Over the past five decades, childhood overweight and obesity has transitioned from public health concern to public health crisis. In 1971, 5.2% of U.S. children ages 2 to 19 were experiencing obesity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a number that increased to 19.3% by 2018.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date September 30, 2021
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Research    COVID-19    Neuroscience   

Can COVID-19 Boost Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease? Early Studies Look at Links

Recent findings linking COVID-19 and Alzheimer’s disease have sparked concern among experts, taking the spotlight at the July Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Denver and prompting an “urgent” call from the Alzheimer’s Disease International for “fast-tracking” research on the issue.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date September 27, 2021
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Community    Pancreatic Cancer    Surgical Oncology

“Sex and the City” Actor’s Death Raises Awareness of Pancreatic Cancer

Actor Willie Garson was probably best known for his role as Stanford Blatch on “Sex and the City,” playing one of Carrie Bradshaw’s New York-savvy best friends.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date September 27, 2021
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Patient Care    Vascular Surgery

Cyclist Back on Road Thanks to Aortic Valve Expertise at CU Anschutz

Jonathan Fox happily entered his 50s with his identity, stress outlet and social life entwined in a heart-healthy activity – cycling – that would easily propel him into his golden years.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date September 20, 2021
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Patient Care    Blood Cancer    Leukemia

Norm MacDonald’s Death Puts Spotlight on Acute Leukemia

Comedian and former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Norm MacDonald died Tuesday, after what his brother, Neil MacDonald, described as a nine-year battle with acute leukemia. Norm MacDonald, known for his intelligence and sarcastic wit, was 61.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date September 16, 2021
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Research    Press Releases    Heart

Travel to High Altitudes Could be Dangerous for People With Heart Conditions

Visiting high-altitude locations may be dangerous for people with high blood pressure or certain heart conditions, according to a new report from the American Heart Association that offers guidance about engaging in recreational activities in mountainous regions.


Author American Heart Association | Publish Date September 15, 2021
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Education    Community   

Climate Change Fuels Multiple Threats to Society’s Health

Labeled a “code red for humanity” in a United Nations report released early last month, climate change has continued to wreak havoc worldwide. In the United States, devastating fires in the West recently traded the spotlight for deadly flooding in the East, keeping the threat squarely on America’s radar.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date September 10, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Community    COVID-19    Quality and Clinical Effectiveness   

Multidisciplinary Team Designs Novel Mask in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

Ideas and innovation don’t always co-exist with convenience. On the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, the road to a novel mask design to address the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic took some unexpected twists and turns.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date September 08, 2021
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Community    Mental Health   

Mass Memorials: A Place to Grieve, Heal, Remember

Images of the crumbling Twin Towers are invading American living rooms and cellphones, as the 20th anniversary of one of the worst days in the nation’s history nears. From Netflix and PBS documentaries to news reports of tribute events across the country, the swell of 9/11 coverage will give rise to uncomfortable emotions for nearly everyone.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date September 07, 2021
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Research    Community    COVID-19   

Harnessing community voices to bolster COVID-19 vaccinations

We are more likely to trust a familiar voice.

The New York Times published a dialect quiz that, by offering users a series of multiple-choice options of everyday life phrases and names, could pinpoint the exact U.S. region a quiz taker was from. Each of us comes from a community with its own dialect—how we talk is unique to not just our state, but our region, county, city, and even neighborhood.


Author Laura Veith - ACCORDS Writer | Publish Date September 06, 2021
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Patient Care    Prostate Cancer

Prostate Cancer Patient Hopes His Story Encourages Early Detection for Others

The diagnosis came as a shock. Although, looking back, Bill Mordecai says it shouldn’t have been. 


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date September 01, 2021
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Research    COVID-19   

Covid Vaccines Put Your Immunity Where Your Mouth Is

While stories about the delta variant flood the news, there may be some measure of relief in these tense times – at least for the vaccinated.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date August 30, 2021
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Research    COVID-19   

Reading the Waves: Summit Targets Pandemic’s Evolution

As the country rides a new wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, it faces a riptide that’s threatening its course. The delta variant, the now-predominant strain of coronavirus, prompted President Joe Biden’s call for booster shots for all vaccinated adults on Aug. 18 and underscored discussions at a research summit that ran parallel to the president’s nationwide address.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date August 24, 2021
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Research    Patient Care   

Christina Applegate Diagnosis Pushes MS Into Spotlight

Multiple sclerosis (MS) landed in the spotlight earlier this month when actress Christina Applegate announced that she had been diagnosed with the disease.


Author Chris Casey | Publish Date August 24, 2021
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Patient Care    Lung Cancer    Clinical Trials

Traveling to CU Cancer Center for a Lung Cancer Clinical Trial

David Kooyman transferred his care to University of Colorado Cancer Center member and associate professor of thoracic oncology, Tejas Patil, MD, to be part of a clinical trial to help with his rare lung cancer gene fusion.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date August 19, 2021
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Patient Care    Pancreatic Cancer    Surgical Oncology

The Pancreatic Cancer Battle That Bonded a Patient and His Physician

Richard Schulick, MD, MBA, director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, becomes close with all of his patients, but he has a special bond with Gerry Turner, one of Schulick’s surgical patients for pancreatic cancer.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date August 18, 2021
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Lung Cancer

CU Experts: Extinguishing Smoking Stigma, Promoting Screening Can Save Lives

Comedian Kathy Griffin’s recently announced lung cancer diagnosis came early and arose from a non-related health screening. A lucky catch, and an understandable path to detection for a person who never smoked.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date August 13, 2021
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COVID-19    Vaccinations

Why COVID-19 Vaccines Don’t Work As Well In Immunocompromised Cancer Patients

Despite the growing threat of the Delta variant, many Americans who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 are living life much as they did pre-pandemic — traveling, shopping, going out to eat, and forgoing masks in many situations.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date August 13, 2021
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Faculty    Cardiothoracic Surgery

“Is There a Physician Onboard?”: Emergency over the Atlantic Reaffirms Surgeon’s Commitment to Helping

You know how it is trying to leave for vacation – there’s always one last thing to do, one last note to write, one last end to tie up before committing to the rest and relaxation.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date August 13, 2021
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Research    Education    Students

Second Annual Medical Student Summer Research Program Offers Mentorship and Hands-On Research Experience

Of all the lessons she learned during the eight-week Medical Student Summer Research Program (MSRP), Rose Castle, a rising second year at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who is interested in pursuing general surgery, drew her main takeaway outside the operating room.


Author Rachel Sauer | Publish Date August 10, 2021
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Research    Education    Magazine

Educational Pipelines Ensure Future Interest in Cancer Research

When you ask a classroom full of middle schoolers what they want to be when they grow up, you’re likely to get a range of answers, from “pro athletes” and “astronauts” to “musicians” and “movie stars.”


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date July 26, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Plastic Surgery

Young Craniofacial Patient Battles Multiple Surgeries With Positive Outlook

“Basketball, playing with sheep, playing with goats, playing with dogs, horse camp, friends ...”

Nine-year-old Danner Plumhoff is rattling off a list of her summer plans. Many of these activities wouldn’t have been possible for her last summer, when she was fresh off an intensive craniofacial surgery. It was her biggest surgery to date, but as a child with a rare variant of Crouzon syndrome, it was hardly her first.


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date July 20, 2021
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Research   

Helping Working Cancer Caregivers Manage Stress

It’s difficult enough when a loved one is diagnosed with cancer, but employed spouses of those who receive the diagnosis also are confronted with an array of practical problems. It’s now up to them to untangle issues around medical leave, health insurance, caregiving benefits, and more.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date July 14, 2021
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COVID-19    Vaccinations

Delta Variant Overtakes COVID-19 Cases in Colorado: Should You Worry?

As a race that pits vaccine against virus forges on, a stealthy move by one contender might have just pushed the finish line farther out.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date July 06, 2021
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Neuroscience    Basic Research

Researchers Reverse Blood Flow Defect in Small Vessel Disease

Using a grainy, black-and-white video image of a mouse brain, Fabrice Dabertrand, PhD, demonstrates how a disease responsible for upwards of 40% of all dementia cases today steals the brain’s ability to nourish cells by halting vessel dilation.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date July 06, 2021
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Education    Community   

Viral Tweet Puts Surgery Resident in the Spotlight

Matthew Bartley, MD, MS, has gone viral (as in trending in the world of social media).


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date July 01, 2021
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Research    Cancer

Tricking Cellular Powerhouse to Circumvent Chemotherapy Resistance

Since a chance discovery by U.S. Army scientists studying mustard gas during World War II, chemotherapy has added countless years to cancer patients’ lives around the world.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date June 24, 2021
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Education    Diversity   

For LGBTQ Community, Ending the Silence Could Enhance Their Lives – and Deaths

In her second year on the job at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Carey Candrian, PhD, was shadowing a hospice admissions nurse as she interviewed a dying woman in the patient’s home.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date June 17, 2021
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Patient Care    Clinical Research   

Newly Approved Alzheimer’s Drug Spurs Hope and Controversy

As controversy swirls around the first disease-modifying Alzheimer’s drug ever approved, top experts at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus see the move – for the most part – as a step forward.


Author Debra Melani | Publish Date June 15, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Community   

Patients Now Have Immediate Access to Their Medical Records. How Can Providers Help Them Make Sense of the Data?

Patients’ rights advocates scored a major victory in April, when a provision went into effect that allows patients immediate access to all information in their medical records, including physician notes and test results. The change is part of the 21st Century Cures Act, which was passed by Congress in 2016 and continues to be updated.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date June 14, 2021
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Research    Honors    Head and Neck Cancer    Magazine    Funding

CU Cancer Center Receives Highly Competitive SPORE Grant for Head and Neck Cancer

Research and treatment of head and neck cancers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center reached a new level this month with a highly competitive Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The SPORE was approved by NCI Scientific Program leadership for FY2021 funding; the projected starting date is July 1.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date June 07, 2021
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Innovation    Education    Community   

Medical Students Help Create Surgical Training Tool to Meet Local and Global Needs

On May 19, 2021, more than 20 medical students from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, along with a handful of residents, fellows, and faculty members from the Department of Surgery, gathered in the home of Yihan Lin, MD, MPH, a cardiothoracic surgery fellow.


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date May 27, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Community    Lung Cancer

From Debilitating Chemo to One Pill a Day for Lung Cancer

One of the most difficult nights of Hank Baskett Sr.’s life was the night he told his wife he had been diagnosed with lung cancer.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 24, 2021
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Community    COVID-19   

CU School of Medicine Doctor Working to Get COVID-19 Supplies to India

After seeing the tragic COVID-19 crisis unfolding in India, Saketh Guntupalli, MD, associate professor of gynecologic oncology in the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, decided to do something about it.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 19, 2021
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Community    COVID-19   

CU School of Medicine Doctor Working to Get COVID-19 Supplies to India

After seeing the tragic COVID-19 crisis unfolding in India, Saketh Guntupalli, MD, associate professor of gynecologic oncology in the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the University of Colorado Cancer Center, decided to do something about it.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 19, 2021
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Research    COVID-19   

Are the COVID-19 Vaccines Good News for Cancer Care?

Long before RNA and mRNA became important parts of the COVID-19 vaccine conversation, researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine were studying how RNA biology can improve diagnostics and therapeutics for a range of diseases.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date May 18, 2021
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Patient Care    Blood Cancer    Leukemia    Magazine    Clinical Trials

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Won’t Slow World Champion Triathlete Down

Siri Lindley couldn’t swim. She had never learned how and the idea of competing in a triathlon seemed completely out of the question.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date May 16, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Patient’s Advice: Take It One Treatment at a Time

It feels odd to use the phrase “perfect timing” when talking about a cancer diagnosis, but that’s exactly how Tonya Quinn describes her experience being diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago.  


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date May 12, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    GITES

Bariatric Surgery Public Health Initiative Improves Lives for Patients with Obesity

Fredric Pieracci, MD, MPH/MSPH, an associate professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Surgery, is the senior author on a new paper published in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases that details the results of a public health initiative to provide affordable bariatric surgery to uninsured Denver County residents.  


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date April 28, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Cardiothoracic Surgery

University of Colorado Surgeon Performs State’s First COVID-19 Lung Transplant

Bryan Raymond was very nearly just another grim entry on the ever-growing list of COVID-19 fatalities. But thanks to efforts by faculty members in the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Department of Surgery, Raymond is a COVID statistic of a different sort — the first person in Colorado to receive a lung transplant related to the virus.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 26, 2021
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Patient Care    Pediatric Cancer    Magazine

CU Cancer Center Technology Gives Kids a Welcome Distraction During Radiation Treatment

Thirty days of radiation treatments — five days a week, with Saturdays and Sundays off — are difficult for even the toughest of adults. But for a child, they’re even harder to bear. They involve fasting, waking up early, and lying in a dark room alone, without even your parents there for support.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 21, 2021
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Patient Care    Community    Awareness    Health equity    Transplant Center

Two Transplant Doctors Explain the Basics of Organ Donation and What’s New in Transplants

April is National Donate Life Month — an awareness month that encourages Americans to register as organ, eye, and tissue donors and that honors those who have saved lives through the gift of donation.


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date April 09, 2021
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Research    Patient Care   

Following Patients’ Progress After Surgery 

For the past nine years, the Surgical Outcomes and Applied Research (SOAR) group at the University of Colorado School of Medicine has been conducting research on health services within the Department of Surgery. A large part of that research has to do with clinical outcomes for surgery patients and how patients fare — in the short term and the long term — after an operation.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date April 07, 2021
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Education    Community    COVID-19   

Navigating Through the Pandemic

As they look back on one of the most challenging years in their medical careers, members of the Department of Surgery at the University of Colorado School of Medicine remember the low points — the crowded emergency rooms, the delayed surgeries, the deaths from the disease — but they remember some high points as well.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date March 24, 2021
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Patient Care    Philanthropy    Prostate Cancer    Magazine

An Engineer Tackles the Problem of Prostate Cancer as a Patient and Financial Donor

Ashton Villars has always been a problem solver. As a competitive athlete in basketball, waterskiing, and tennis and an actual rocket scientist, Villars has tackled every challenge in life head on — including his prostate cancer diagnosis. Now, he’s bringing that same problem-solving spirit to supporting cancer research. 


Author Valerie Gleaton | Publish Date March 05, 2021
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Education    Community   

Johns Hopkins Director of Surgery Speaks at CU Surgery Department’s First DEI Lecture

“Diversity and inclusion in medicine can save lives.” That was the message from Robert Higgins, MD, MSHA, director of the Department of Surgery and surgeon-in-chief at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date February 25, 2021
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Education    Community   

Resident Recounts Her Son’s NICU Battle in Essay for New England Journal of Medicine

As a resident in the Department of Surgery at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Heather Carmichael, MD, was accustomed to the emotional remove doctors have from their patients. The distance that allows surgeons to cut into someone without hesitation or to deliver bad news without falling apart.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date February 19, 2021
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Research    Education   

Medical Student Presents Research at Academic Surgical Congress

Eighteen physicians, residents, and medical students from the University of Colorado School of Medicine presented on their research this week at the Academic Surgical Congress, an annual convention hosted by the Society of University Surgeons.


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date February 05, 2021
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Education    Awareness

CU Cancer Center Celebrates World Cancer Day

For the past 20 years, the Union for International Cancer Control has designated February 4 as World Cancer Day — a day to raise awareness, improve education, and catalyze personal, collective, and government action around the deadly disease. The organization hopes to reduce the number of premature deaths from cancer and noncommunicable diseases by one-third by 2030.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date February 02, 2021
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Research    Quality and Clinical Effectiveness

Practicing Fire Safety in the Operating Room

Edward Jones, MD, MS, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is a nationally recognized expert on preventing operating room (OR) fires.


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date January 13, 2021
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Research    Patient Care    Quality and Clinical Effectiveness

Safety and Quality Are a Primary Focus for the CU Department of Surgery

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought new attention to the safety of patients during surgery. But long before the concerns brought on by coronavirus, the CU Department of Surgery was working to make patient safety a priority.


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date January 06, 2021
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Research    Vascular Surgery

The Pandemic’s Impact on Vascular Surgery

In a normal year, vascular surgeons would never postpone surgeries for patients with aortic or carotid disease or other conditions.


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date December 30, 2020
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Patient Care    Magazine

Increase in Cancer Deaths Predicted Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

COVID-19 is the most-talked-about health concern in 2020, but for many, it is not the deadliest disease. University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center leadership is bringing attention to the fact that more people will die from cancer than COVID this year.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date December 22, 2020
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Education    Community    Plastic Surgery

Department of Surgery Makes Diversity, Equity and Inclusion a Priority

The racial reckoning occurring in America in a year that saw the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and others touches nearly every aspect of society. From corporate boardrooms and HR departments to police forces and universities, assumptions are being questioned and priorities reexamined as we are reminded of the inequities that still exist for people of color.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date December 14, 2020
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Research    Cancer    Surgical Oncology

Untangling Medical Cannabis

Medical cannabis was legalized in Colorado in 2000, but 20 years later, Camille Stewart, MD, isn’t able to prescribe it to her patients. Nor is she able to dictate the dosage or frequency with which patients take the drug.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date December 07, 2020
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Patient Care    Community    Publications

Changes Needed to Address Financial Hardship from Cancer

Until you or a loved one are facing treatment for a cancer diagnosis, you may not realize the cost associated with treatment and doctor visits. Unfortunately, the cost is continuing to rise as new treatments are discovered and patients are responsible for more of those costs, even if they have health insurance coverage.


Author Cancer Center | Publish Date November 24, 2020
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Awareness    Pancreatic Cancer    Magazine    Surgical Oncology

Alex Trebek’s Death Raising Awareness and Questions About Pancreatic Cancer

Longtime “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek announced it to the world on March 6, 2019: Like 50,000 other Americans each year, he had been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date November 11, 2020
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Sarcoma    Cancer

New Disney+ Movie Raising Awareness of Rare Cancer

A new movie streaming on Disney+ is shining a spotlight on a rare type of bone cancer that occurs most often in children and young adults.


Author Greg Glasgow | Publish Date November 02, 2020
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Patient Care    Plastic Surgery

Improving Confidence with Reconstructive Surgery After a Double Mastectomy

Knowing your family health history is one of the first steps to finding out if you may have a higher risk of cancer and might need early screenings. Ela Carta is no stranger to the struggles of having a family history of cancer. At the age of 30, Carta’s aunt, Audie, began urging Carta to get a mammogram. With a long family history of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast disease, Carta knew she had to be proactive with her health.


Author Chanthy Na | Publish Date October 21, 2020
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Research    Patient Care    Community    Prostate Cancer    Cancer    Urology

Former Broncos Punter Wants Men to Share Their Experience With Prostate Cancer

Growing up, Douglas “Bucky” Dilts was all too familiar with the dangers of cancer. “My mother ran a cancer tumor registry at St Joseph's Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia for over 25 years. She was always telling us about different types of cancer, so cancer was always at the forefront.”  


Author Department of Surgery | Publish Date September 23, 2020
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Patient Care    Community    Plastic Surgery

Cleft Lip Reconstruction Transforms Jennifer's Outlook Making Her Brave Enough to Teach

As a young child, Jennifer Falomir-Lopez just wanted to look “normal” like all the other kids. She knew she was different but couldn’t explain to her friends why she looked different. Jennifer was born with a cleft lip and cleft alveolus.


Author Chanthy Na | Publish Date July 28, 2020
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School of Medicine In the News

Colorado Parent

When You’re Worried About Substance Use Where Your Child Plays

news outletColorado Parent
Publish DateApril 30, 2022

Drinking alcohol and using marijuana is not uncommon, but what if you suspect these substances are being abused at a home where your child wants to play? Two parents and a substance abuse expert weigh in on how to handle the situation.

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The Denver Post

Colorado K-12 schools stock up on naloxone as teen overdose deaths rise sharply

news outletThe Denver Post
Publish DateApril 28, 2022

Children’s Hospital Colorado — which declared a “state of emergency”
last year as its emergency departments filled with children seeking
help for mental illnesses — is treating more patients for fentanyl
overdoses in its emergency room, Sam Wang, a medical toxicologist
and pediatric emergency medicine specialist at Children’s Hospital
[and associate professor of pediatrics at CU school of Medicine].

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Healio

Moms who receive investigational RSV vaccine pass antibodies to infants

news outletHealio
Publish DateApril 28, 2022

Infants born to mothers who were immunized with an investigational vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus — or RSV — received antibodies across the placenta, with no “evident safety concerns,” results from a phase 2b trial showed.

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Health Day

Vaccination Cuts Severe COVID-19 Risk in Heart Transplant Patients

news outletHealth Day
Publish DateApril 28, 2022

Among orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) recipients, COVID-19 vaccination is associated with fewer COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths and no heart transplant-specific adverse events, according to a study published online April 27 in JAMA Cardiology.

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